Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Military Modelling

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Probably oversight, but here you go......

AEC Militant​


  • The AEC Militant (or "Milly") was a post-war development by AEC of the AEC Matador artillery tractor used during World War II. Externally the most noticeable development was the cab, which was considerably enlarged. Unlike the Matador only 6-wheel versions were produced. 4-wheel versions are extant, but they are probably conversions and one is a Matador with a Mk1 Militant cab. Other changes included the fitting of a larger, 11.3-litre 6-cylinder, diesel engine and the use of a steel frame for the cab, rather than the ash (fraxinus) wood frame of the Matador. The Militant Mark 1 was produced in 6x4 (6 wheels, 4 driven) and 6x6 form (6 wheels, 6 driven).
AEC Militant Mk1, Abergavenny.jpg
AEC Militant, Mk I GS wagon
TypeMedium/heavy artillery tractor, 10-ton cargo truck
Place of originUnited Kingdom
DesignerAssociated Equipment Company
ManufacturerAssociated Equipment Company
Produced1952–1964
No. built3,200
VariantsO859 (6x4)
O860 (6x6)
MassUnladen 10.1–10.3 long tons (10.3–10.5 t)
Length24 ft 1 in (7.34 m)
Width8 ft (2.4 m)
Height9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)

EngineAEC A223 straight-six diesel
150 bhp (110 kW)
Drive6x4 or part time 6x6
Transmission5F1Rx2
SuspensionLive axles on semi-elliptical multi-leaf springs inverted at the rear
Maximum speed25 mph (40 km/h)
ReferencesA complete directory of military vehicles
Specifications
AEC Militant Mk III
Type10-ton cargo truck
MassUnladen 11.66 long tons (11.85 t)
Length29 ft 9 in (9.07 m)
Width8 ft 2 in (2.49 m)
Height11 ft 6 in (3.51 m)

EngineAEC AV760 straight-six diesel
226 bhp (169 kW)
Drive6x6
Transmission6F1Rx2
Maximum speed33 mph (53 km/h)
ReferencesThe illustrated encyclopedia of military vehicles

Variants​

Although primarily intended as a replacement for the Matador artillery tractor, other variants included an articulated lorry tractor unit, a General Service or cargo lorry with a longer wheelbase and as a chassis for mounting various cranes, usually supplied by Coles.


Service and Civilian Life​

The Militant served with the British Army and some other armies in most parts of the world. It was intended as an improved artillery tractor, but after the Second World War, the development of large artillery pieces was gradually dropped in favour of more effective rockets and missiles, making this role largely redundant during the Militant's service life. Crews had mixed views of the Militant. Because it had no power steering, it took considerable effort to turn the steering wheel at slow speeds and in difficult conditions. However, it was credited with a good cross-country performance and was often used to recover the six-wheel drive Alvis Stalwart amphibious lorries that bogged in difficult conditions. (The MkIII did have a power assist Steering Ram).
Most variants were fitted with a chassis-mounted winch that was driven through the gearbox. This winch, which was intended for manoeuvering of the towed field gun and for self-recovery of the vehicle, proved extremely strong and reliable. The Militant gained the nickname 'Knocker' from its military crews which may have been due to the rhythmic sound of the slow-revving engines.
The Knocker was the nickname of the MkI and the one MkI CALM was still in service with each RCT Transport Squadron until the AEC fleet was replaced by the Bedford 14 Tonne 6X6 in the early 90s. AEC MkIII Recovery Trucks were replaced by Foden GS Recovery 6X6.
Many Militants were sold off by the Army in the 1970s and were purchased as heavy recovery vehicles or for forestry use by civilian operators. They were not as popular for forestry operations as their predecessor the Matador because the extra length and an extra axle made them less manoeuvrable in confined spaces. However, some users simply shortened the chassis and removed one axle, effectively creating a more powerful version of the Matador.
AEC MK1 Militants were still in service as late as 1985; the MK3s were still in service as late as 1990.
 
That's the desert version. This one (stating the obvious) is European theatre. Need to dig out the paints for it - I used Lifecolor which is not may favourite manufacturer.
I find life colour (I refuse to use the American spelling) only really good for airbrushing, Humbrol enamels for brush detail work, what are your brush paint acrylic preferences?
 
I find life colour (I refuse to use the American spelling) only really good for airbrushing, Humbrol enamels for brush detail work, what are your brush paint acrylic preferences?
I only really airbrush apart from figures which I use Vallejo on and occasionally oils for face painting
 
the WW1 Tank I built for the WW1 Group build last year. Needs some adjustment to set it right.
tank returned.png

the Colonel is down, I need to gently slide a blade in between the bottom of the glass and the card base to open it and re stand the figure up in his rightful place, with the RSM.
Colonel Down.png
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

ches

LE
There does seem to be something of an unfinished projects being resurrected theme....i'm just about to order some Aber ally barrels for my old DAK Pz ii that was primed & undercoated ages ago. I also found my Model Kasten track set for my Tamiya Cromwell to so I'm going to look at getting them finished at some point. Problem is I'm back working from home in a week or so (yay new job for few months) so will have less time. I've also got a TE Lawro & Clansman busts to finish.
 
Slight thread drift...but possibly a good subject for a conversion/diorama...

Lots of you obviously know a lot more about WW2 trucks than I do. Can anyone ID the make of truck being used as a bus in the opening few minutes of this film? It reminds me of the Airfix AEC Matador...


PS - do not watch the rest of the film. It is pretty incomprehesible... even by Thai standards... :)
 
Looks like CMP Chevvy C60 3 tonner.
 
Last edited:
Slight thread drift...but possibly a good subject for a conversion/diorama...

Lots of you obviously know a lot more about WW2 trucks than I do. Can anyone ID the make of truck being used as a bus in the opening few minutes of this film? It reminds me of the Airfix AEC Matador...


PS - do not watch the rest of the film. It is pretty incomprehesible... even by Thai standards... :)
CMP either ford or chevrolet 60L
Pipped at the post by Brewmeister
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Slight thread drift...but possibly a good subject for a conversion/diorama...

Lots of you obviously know a lot more about WW2 trucks than I do. Can anyone ID the make of truck being used as a bus in the opening few minutes of this film? It reminds me of the Airfix AEC Matador...


PS - do not watch the rest of the film. It is pretty incomprehesible... even by Thai standards... :)
Deffo a CMP C60! Cab is the wrong shape for the Ford and the Matador. Many of these former military trucks ended up being "appropriated" by soldiers of third world nations, with the sole intention of flogging them on the open market. Most vehicles ended up in the so-called "Palm-oil"states as crew wagons or logging trucks, although a good few were converted to "Safari" buses and even public transport!
 
I find life colour (I refuse to use the American spelling) only really good for airbrushing, Humbrol enamels for brush detail work, what are your brush paint acrylic preferences?

Deffo Vallejo for acrylics.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

SecurityGeek

Old-Salt
I find life colour (I refuse to use the American spelling) only really good for airbrushing, Humbrol enamels for brush detail work, what are your brush paint acrylic preferences?
+1 for @SkippedOnce opinion for VallejoAcrylics. I use both Vallejo air and the normal variety. Airbrush and hairy stick. Tamiya acrylics still used and replaced with Vallejo as they die.
Used Life Colour for a few kits (Early WW2 RAF) as their colour schemes seemed to match the defined standard better. Have not used them for over a year now.
I did not like their consistency for air brushing (could have been a dodgy batch?) and coverage when hairy stick painting. Also, 1 year later and the colours appear to have faded considerably compared to similar models on display in the same place which were painted with Vallejo or Tamiya even after varnishing.
On the varnish front, they also seemed to react badly with Humbrol and Vallejo varnishes. Again, not unusual with some paint types which recommend their proprietary blend varnish as the "best" solution.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
+1 for @SkippedOnce opinion for VallejoAcrylics. I use both Vallejo air and the normal variety. Airbrush and hairy stick. Tamiya acrylics still used and replaced with Vallejo as they die.
Used Life Colour for a few kits (Early WW2 RAF) as their colour schemes seemed to match the defined standard better. Have not used them for over a year now.
I did not like their consistency for air brushing (could have been a dodgy batch?) and coverage when hairy stick painting. Also, 1 year later and the colours appear to have faded considerably compared to similar models on display in the same place which were painted with Vallejo or Tamiya even after varnishing.
On the varnish front, they also seemed to react badly with Humbrol and Vallejo varnishes. Again, not unusual with some paint types which recommend their proprietary blend varnish as the "best" solution.
Agree with you over Vallejo Acrylics. @daz put me on to them and I now use them on all occasions. I find when using the hairy stick, it is better to give each item a coat of primer first.
 
the Colonel is back on his feet, talking in a quiet voice with the RSM about what Lt Danvers may or may not be saying to the General.
colonel talking with the RSM.png

General: "So Danvers, can I count on more of your tanks making it to the startline for my Big Push"?

Lt Danvers: "you could General, if it wasn't for all these tank Demonstrations for the General staff, wearing them out".
ALL FOUR FIGURES STANDING.png
 
Top