Military Modelling

ches

LE
I know I said I'd never order anything from China again, knowing the delay and not being a fan of them right now, but they are selling these, two heads each, so I won't have to use that head with the daft beret. The delay from china will let me get on with the jeep.
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For accuracy lose the arab headdress option. It was never worn on operations, was a PR stunt. It couldn't be worn in the vehicles esp on the move when the desert winds would mean you couldn't see a thing. Source for this is the excellent book about the LRDG, The Men Who Made the SAS - Gavin Mortimer. I've also read it in other sources.

I've got the jeep in my own stash & can;t wait to get on with it. There are some excellent wee stowage sets much better than the kit versions, check Scalemates for a list.
 
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OH, another beautiful myth busted, that's a shame as the beret head looks wrong too. I could have them posing in arab head gear for the AFPU photographer diorama.
 
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PFGEN

GCM
For accuracy lose the arab headdress option. It was never worn on operations, was a PR stunt. It couldn't be worn in the vehicles esp on the move when the desert winds would mean you couldn't see a thing. Source for this is the excellent book about the LRDG, The Men Who Made the SAS - Gavin Mortimer. I've also read it in other sources.

I've got the jeep in my own stash & can;t wait to get on with it. There are some excellent wee stowage sets much better than the kit versions, check Scalemates for a list.
There are quite a few old photos on the net of the lads dressed when the PR types aren't around. Looks a lot more practical with lads in long coats, jerkins and what almost looks like polar hats along with a variety of berets and chip pokes. I guess whatever was practical and functional to keep the sand out of the face and keep warm during the dessert nights.
 
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Dads203

Clanker
A tad more bench time again tonight, working on the armoured VHF bases, I have another one to do
on the back and one for the HF base up front near the louvres . The armoured coax cap was cut from the kit roof using the amazing Dspiae side cutters, expensive but well worth the dosh as they are so accurate. A must for any serious modeller.

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Getting closer to a 436 now.
 
A tad more bench time again tonight, working on the armoured VHF bases, I have another one to do
on the back and one for the HF base up front near the louvres . The armoured coax cap was cut from the kit roof using the amazing Dspiae side cutters, expensive but well worth the dosh as they are so accurate. A must for any serious modeller.

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Getting closer to a 436 now.
Got a picture of the side cutters mate?
 

Dads203

Clanker
Got a picture of the side cutters mate?
Here you go fella, away from the bench now but these are on the bay and cheap.
i was sceptical about them with the high cost but I tried before I bought and they are the dogs. Five builds in and they are as good as the day I bought them. They cut resin casting blocks like a hot knife through butter.

 
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Here you go fella, away from the bench now but these are on the bay and cheap.
i was sceptical about them with the high cost but I tried before I bought and they are the dogs. Five builds in and they are as good as the day I bought them. They cut resin casting blocks like a hot knife through butter.

That's added to the wish list for when my current ones expire, cheers!
 

Dads203

Clanker
Version 2 and version 3 of the radios underway. V3 on the left.
These are shaping up well. Should be seeing the DMU’s soon and a few other bits.
Hopefully if I can get the dims then a SCRA(T) with CIG might be on the cards.

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Pops the resin under pressure and compresses the air bubbles down, you can make a vessel from a pressure cooker and connect it to your airbrush compressor. Thats how Eduard and other companies produce bubble free resin stuff. They do it on an industrial scale using autoclaves.
That is not how it works. High pressure vessels are used for prepreg carbon cloth in autoclaves.

Model companies pouring liquid casting resin do the exact opposite. Vacuum degassing. The mould full of freshly poured resin is put into a vacuum chamber and the air sucked out until you achieve a high vacuum. The tiny air bubbles grow under the reduced pressure and keep growing until they burst. With liquid boiling at lower temperatures at lower pressure the resin comes to a rolling boil at room temperature as the air bubble come to the surface and burst, once that subsides a bit you know the vast majority of the air bubbles are gone. Open the valve and let the pressure normalise and any air bubbles left in the resin shrink back to being tiny and hopefully unobtrusive.
 
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It was also militarily useless. It was a point defence aircraft (a) only good for attacking anything within 25 miles of its takeoff point and (b) no good at night. The fuel was only good for 7.5 minutes of power...

So it could only attack the USAAF, and you would have needed to build tens of thousands of them to inflict a high attrition rate on the 8th Air Force - you would have had to carpet Germany with them.

Wordsmith
There is a UK association with the Me-163:

Extract from a recent article in the Air and Space Review vol 22 (2), Summer 2019. B J Hunt: Lost In Space: The Defeat of the V-2 and Post-War British Exploitation of German Long Range Rocket Technology

GPE [Guided Projectile Establishment] at Westcott was the hub of most British post-war rocket research and exploitation, and was responsible, under Dr William Cook, for guided missile development for the British Army and Royal Navy. The leading engineer was Dr Johannes Schmidt, who had been responsible for development of the ‘Walter’ rocket engine for the Me-163 Komet fighter, which first flew at the Luftwaffe Peenemünde East research centre. Unfortunately, there was to be a major setback. In November 1947, a German-designed Rocket Assisted Take-Off unit exploded during a test run, killing two British technicians and decapitating Dr Schmidt.
That would make for an interesting diorama...
 
There is a UK association with the Me-163:

Extract from a recent article in the Air and Space Review vol 22 (2), Summer 2019. B J Hunt: Lost In Space: The Defeat of the V-2 and Post-War British Exploitation of German Long Range Rocket Technology



That would make for an interesting diorama...
I used to get my MG serviced at Westcott.
 
I bet it went like a rocket afterwards...
Very good - I can get at least 105 mph out of it.

Westcott's an odd place - lots of weird remnants still there.
 

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