Military Modelling

what colour is that just out of interest - any idea?
Complex this one. The RAF started painting the jets Barley Grey around 81/82 - the 74 jets came in 84 and were painted in the US - which didn't quite match. Article here describes:

Camouflage & Markings of No. 74 Squadron RAF (Part 2)

The US painted jets always had a bluer tinge and a semi gloss finish to my eye but that looks like a later repaint to Barley Grey which ends up almost multi greys.

ETA:

RAF Phantom colours are

Undersides - Light Aircraft Grey BS381C: 627 (FS26440) = Humbrol 166 or Xtracolor X015

Top sides and Outer wings - Barley Grey, now know as Camoflage Grey BS381C: 626 (FS36314) = Humbrol 167 or Xtracolor X017

Top Inner wings - Medium Sea Grey BS381C: 637 (FS26270) = Humbrol 165 or Xtracolor X003

I've given you Humbrol and Xtracolor paint codes which are both enamels, but all three colours are also available in acrylics


From here: RAF Phantom FGR.2 colours (greys)
 
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I have been working my little cotton socks off today unlike some who have the time to play games. :)

3 hours of hard graft have produced what I think are some good results.

View attachment 463199

The engine cover for the Meteor clamped to the original plastic one to get the curve right. I am going to have to make some wooden wedges/jigs to hold the metal as I solder it.

View attachment 463201

Could be better but getting there.

Now for the main event, the landing flaps on the Meteor.

View attachment 463202

View attachment 463204

Bent up and lightly held in position with a dab of SG. Inspiration struck out of the blue and I used the bending tool as a clamp although a little later I saw that it could be a problem. The tube is not supplied but I had some 1mm tube from the WW1 builds.

View attachment 463211

Cutting the solder into small parts seems to be the key and works very well as I don't want too much. The blue arrow is the flux which is the next problem i need to solve. Hypodermic needle is too big or the flux is too gloopy to run into the gaps. As you will see from the next one it can flow too much when hot.

View attachment 463212

Just as I was about to add heat I realised that although the clam is doing an excellent job it was also a massive heat sink so I added a wood chip to give some space that would not conduct heat. Solder melted and run into the flux (pink area). It has obscured some of the fine detail so the rivet counters may not like the result.

View attachment 463214

The other braces are tacked with SG and are the task for this PM. I am aware that when I put heat to the other end it could spring the joins that I have already soldered. I will need to put a heat sink on them or some wet tissue.

As a learning tool I think it is going well but the end result may be disappointing as I think this is covered and will not be seen.
Maybe some one has already said but I suspect your using a cored solder. The flux (yes it’s the proper word) is contained in the solder. As it’s designed for electrical work not “welding”. It’s not really enough to get the solder flowing in to the small places.

If you can get hold of liquid or paste flux paint that into the cracks. It’ll really help the flow and avoid blobbing of the solder.


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Yep, SUU-23 on the centreline.
Good gun, cracking design but I came to think of the BK 27 as being equal or better. Both had their issues mind.
 
Maybe some one has already said but I suspect your using a cored solder. The flux (yes it’s the proper word) is contained in the solder. As it’s designed for electrical work not “welding”. It’s not really enough to get the solder flowing in to the small places.

If you can get hold of liquid or paste flux paint that into the cracks. It’ll really help the flow and avoid blobbing of the solder.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I did about six other guys small tags on my FTJ, they all passed and I got fail on it. :D
 

offog

LE
Maybe some one has already said but I suspect your using a cored solder. The flux (yes it’s the proper word) is contained in the solder. As it’s designed for electrical work not “welding”. It’s not really enough to get the solder flowing in to the small places.

If you can get hold of liquid or paste flux paint that into the cracks. It’ll really help the flow and avoid blobbing of the solder.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
As I have been learning I have been using a variety of solder. 60/40 and no lead as well as solder tape with flux in it. The liquid seems to be the best but getting a small amount in place is the problem as the hypodermic has too much but a lot less than the brush. I am using MG rosin flux liquid at the moment but am very open to suggestions and tips.

I did notice that the 60/40 had 3 tubes in it as I was cutting it. the tape is rubbish but may try the lead free again.
 
I've gone and made a spur of the moment purchase after a couple of glasses of rum last night celebrating some success building my VW Beetle, (not the German Civilian Police model the real one in my workshop) I'm regretting not reading Smeggies post on the Roden offering, I really wanted to make the Armoured car from Lawrence of Arabia, my favourite all time movie, now I'm going to have to watch it this afternoon to see If I've accidentally made a wise choice, or to Quote Hornblower "a misguided purchase"
s-l1600.jpg
 
I've gone and made a spur of the moment purchase after a couple of glasses of rum last night celebrating some success building my VW Beetle, (not the German Civilian Police model the real one in my workshop) I'm regretting not reading Smeggies post on the Roden offering, I really wanted to make the Armoured car from Lawrence of Arabia, my favourite all time movie, now I'm going to have to watch it this afternoon to see If I've accidentally made a wise choice, or to Quote Hornblower "a misguided purchase"
View attachment 463746
What make is this one?
 
As I have been learning I have been using a variety of solder. 60/40 and no lead as well as solder tape with flux in it. The liquid seems to be the best but getting a small amount in place is the problem as the hypodermic has too much but a lot less than the brush. I am using MG rosin flux liquid at the moment but am very open to suggestions and tips.

I did notice that the 60/40 had 3 tubes in it as I was cutting it. the tape is rubbish but may try the lead free again.
Clean the surfaces enthusiastically then ‘tin’ them, ie flow the solder on one part at a time, wipe off excess while hot. Put the parts together and ‘sweat’ them together, ie heat but no additional solder. Using a heat gun is good for even heating and you can see when the joint ‘wets‘ and flows.
 
"War slug", you know good ole dependable war slug.....no I've never heard of them either, I did say I'd had a glass of Navy rum, or two, I know daz would never make that mistake.
I guess they would have run out of printer ink otherwise -
Changchun Haoyu Automation Science and Technology Co. Ltd, Changchun, China

I hope the product is as well-detailed as the website!
 

daz

LE
"War slug", you know good ole dependable war slug.....no I've never heard of them either, I did say I'd had a glass of Navy rum, or two, I know daz would never make that mistake.
You should of gone for their Sd.Kfz.182 KINGTIGER(Henschel Turret) That should of kept you busy for 5 or 6 ........minutes :) Oh, and pics of the Roll's can be found on their facebook page Warslug
 
You should of gone for their Sd.Kfz.182 KINGTIGER(Henschel Turret) That should of kept you busy for 5 or 6 ........minutes :) Oh, and pics of the Roll's can be found on their facebook page Warslug
they usually make top end steel model kits of Military vehicle subjects, this Armoured car as a pk seems to be a departure for them. I don't feel so bad about making a snap decision now, mind you I won't make a habit of it.
 
Calling all you expert figure modellers....

I've just nabbed these on Ebay for just over a tenner:

s-l1600.jpg


I think they are 1970s as I seem to dimly remember them - are they any good?
 

offog

LE
Clean the surfaces enthusiastically then ‘tin’ them, ie flow the solder on one part at a time, wipe off excess while hot. Put the parts together and ‘sweat’ them together, ie heat but no additional solder. Using a heat gun is good for even heating and you can see when the joint ‘wets‘ and flows.
Thanks for your response and help it is very appreciated.

What do you clean them with? I have alcohol will that do.

Also it is very difficult on small parts 1.5mmx4mm.
 
Thanks for your response and help it is very appreciated.

What do you clean them with? I have alcohol will that do.

Also it is very difficult on small parts 1.5mmx4mm.
IPA will get the grease off, ideally the surface should be scrubbed with a green 3M pad or similar just before assembly as the surface will oxidise quickly. IIRC model train spotters have some kind of abrasive rubber to clean their rails, this might work for the tidgy parts.
edit: Iso Propyl Alcohol
 
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offog

LE
Indian Pale Ale?

For my part they will be lost in scotch bright. The rubber looks useful, thanks.


You could have told me yesterday as I have just put in an order with them for other item.
 

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