Military Modelling

Helm

MIA
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I prefer your old avatar, much more sarcastic looking which is how I read a lot of your posts.
I have a mug which I was given in the "secret Santa" which says
"I Use Sarcasm At Work Because Punching Someone In Their Stupid Face Is Frowned Upon By Management"
Apparently it suits me.
And you reminded me, this makes some of the weak angry, so it returns
 

Kirkz

LE
I have a mug which I was given in the "secret Santa" which says
"I Use Sarcasm At Work Because Punching Someone In Their Stupid Face Is Frowned Upon By Management"
Apparently it suits me.
And you reminded me, this makes some of the weak angry, so it returns
It amuses me no end.
Seeing it after reading certain posts has made me laugh out loud many times.
 
I have a mug which I was given in the "secret Santa" which says
"I Use Sarcasm At Work Because Punching Someone In Their Stupid Face Is Frowned Upon By Management"
Apparently it suits me.
And you reminded me, this makes some of the weak angry, so it returns
Bravo!
 
I've been photographing some more wargames stuff in the sunshine. 15mm XIVth Army (Burma Campaign) this time:


Above: A 25pdr Field Artillery Battery. The vehicles are marked up for 139 (4th London) Field Regt RA, 7th Indian Division ('Golden Arrow') - red & blue square with '42'. Div sign is the black circle with golden arrow. This regiment spent a year in the Arakan from July 1943 to July 1944 as a Jungle Field Regt, equipped with 3.7-inch Mountain Howitzers and 3-inch Mortars. It fought using this organisation at the 'Battle of the Admin Box'. However, it was reorganised as a standard Field Regiment for the advance into Burma. I must confess that they probably had CMP Quad Tractors, rather than the Morris Quads shown here. Note that in Burma, 25pdrs usually had the Mk 1 barrel, which lacked the muzzle-brake of the Mk 2.


Above: A patrol from 'B' Sqn, Indian 16th Light Cavalry: Daimler Armoured Car, Daimler 'Dingo' Scout Car, Wheeled Armoured Carrier (India Pattern) converted to a 3-inch mortar carrier and some dismounts from the Support Troop, who have swapped their armoured transport for Jeeps. This regiment was designated as XIVth Army Recce Regt, so has the circular version of the XIVth Army badge (as painted on vehicles - on uniforms it was a shield), with the '44' of an armoured car regt and white square 'B' Squadron sign.


Above: Sikh infantry.


Above Indian Sappers. The vehicles are marked up for 62 Field Coy Indian Engineers (Queen Victoria's Own Madras Sappers & Miners), 7th Indian Division ('Golden Arrow') - '51' on cobalt-blue square and div sign as before. The India Pattern Wheeled Carrier is the Eng Recce vehicle. These were fairly uncommon, but Bill Slim mentioned having a ride in one belonging to 7 Div Engineers, so it had to be included. The trucks are CMP 15cwts, plus a Dodge Weapons Carrier. These (along with Jeeps) were ubiquitous in Burma. The Valentine Bridgelayer isn't actually an Engineers vehicle - they were operated as Independent Bridging Troops RAC, with one such troop being assigned to the Indian Tank Brigade Headquarters (50, 254 & 255 Tk Bdes). A friend of mine converted this from a standard Valentine. In reality they lacked sand-skirts, but the only available model at the time had cast-on sand-skirts, so we were stuck with them.


Above: A Section of Bofors 40mm LAA Guns from 24 LAA/AT Regt RA, 7th Indian Division. By mid-1943, the lack of Japanese air or tank support led XIVth Army to consolidate LAA and AT Regts of the RA and IA into single LAA/AT Regts (two batteries of each). To make the organisation even more flexible, the AT Batteries also often carried 3-inch Mortars, allowing them to become ad hoc mortar batteries. Note the markings on the gunshields - Field Regts and Anti-Tank Regts generally didn't do this during the war and only marked their vehicles, but AA Regts frequently marked their guns.


Above: A close-up of the Morris CDSW tractors. These were originally designed to haul 18pdr Field Guns, but with the introduction of the 25pdr were relegated to haul 40mm Bofors Guns of LAA Regts until replaced from 1944/45 with the Bedford QLB. In Burma these were actually pretty rare, with CMP 15cwts (like those of the Engineers above) typically being used in the role.
 
I've been photographing some more wargames stuff in the sunshine. 15mm XIVth Army (Burma Campaign) this time:


Above: A 25pdr Field Artillery Battery. The vehicles are marked up for 139 (4th London) Field Regt RA, 7th Indian Division ('Golden Arrow') - red & blue square with '42'. Div sign is the black circle with golden arrow. This regiment spent a year in the Arakan from July 1943 to July 1944 as a Jungle Field Regt, equipped with 3.7-inch Mountain Howitzers and 3-inch Mortars. It fought using this organisation at the 'Battle of the Admin Box'. However, it was reorganised as a standard Field Regiment for the advance into Burma. I must confess that they probably had CMP Quad Tractors, rather than the Morris Quads shown here. Note that in Burma, 25pdrs usually had the Mk 1 barrel, which lacked the muzzle-brake of the Mk 2.


Above: A patrol from 'B' Sqn, Indian 16th Light Cavalry: Daimler Armoured Car, Daimler 'Dingo' Scout Car, Wheeled Armoured Carrier (India Pattern) converted to a 3-inch mortar carrier and some dismounts from the Support Troop, who have swapped their armoured transport for Jeeps. This regiment was designated as XIVth Army Recce Regt, so has the circular version of the XIVth Army badge (as painted on vehicles - on uniforms it was a shield), with the '44' of an armoured car regt and white square 'B' Squadron sign.


Above: Sikh infantry.


Above Indian Sappers. The vehicles are marked up for 62 Field Coy Indian Engineers (Queen Victoria's Own Madras Sappers & Miners), 7th Indian Division ('Golden Arrow') - '51' on cobalt-blue square and div sign as before. The India Pattern Wheeled Carrier is the Eng Recce vehicle. These were fairly uncommon, but Bill Slim mentioned having a ride in one belonging to 7 Div Engineers, so it had to be included. The trucks are CMP 15cwts, plus a Dodge Weapons Carrier. These (along with Jeeps) were ubiquitous in Burma. The Valentine Bridgelayer isn't actually an Engineers vehicle - they were operated as Independent Bridging Troops RAC, with one such troop being assigned to the Indian Tank Brigade Headquarters (50, 254 & 255 Tk Bdes). A friend of mine converted this from a standard Valentine. In reality they lacked sand-skirts, but the only available model at the time had cast-on sand-skirts, so we were stuck with them.


Above: A Section of Bofors 40mm LAA Guns from 24 LAA/AT Regt RA, 7th Indian Division. By mid-1943, the lack of Japanese air or tank support led XIVth Army to consolidate LAA and AT Regts of the RA and IA into single LAA/AT Regts (two batteries of each). To make the organisation even more flexible, the AT Batteries also often carried 3-inch Mortars, allowing them to become ad hoc mortar batteries. Note the markings on the gunshields - Field Regts and Anti-Tank Regts generally didn't do this during the war and only marked their vehicles, but AA Regts frequently marked their guns.


Above: A close-up of the Morris CDSW tractors. These were originally designed to haul 18pdr Field Guns, but with the introduction of the 25pdr were relegated to haul 40mm Bofors Guns of LAA Regts until replaced from 1944/45 with the Bedford QLB. In Burma these were actually pretty rare, with CMP 15cwts (like those of the Engineers above) typically being used in the role.
FoW?
 
Yeah, most of the models are by them. I've never played FoW, but I have written bits of their books for free models... ;)

The Daimler AC, Dingo, Jeeps and WC51 are by Skytrex and some of the Sappers (chaps in bush-hats and with flamethrowers and some of the mine-detector blokes) are by Peter Pig. The rest are all Flames of War.
 
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Oh and the Valentine was a pre-Flames of War model by Battlefront Miniatures. With lots of bits of plastic, brass and balsa wood added.
 
Oh and the Valentine was a pre-Flames of War model by Battlefront Miniatures. With lots of bits of plastic, brass and balsa wood added.
Actually, I was querying which rules set you were using, but TVM for the additional info, although I do 20mm rather than 15mm for this era.
 
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Actually, I was querying which rules set you were using, but TVM for the additional info, although I do 20mm rather than 15mm for this era.
I use 'Battlefront: WWII' by fire & Fury: Fire and Fury Games - designers of wargame miniatures rules

Excellent set of rules, though not to everyone's taste as they're not 1:1. Instead, each vehicle/gun is 1:2 or 1:3 ratio and each infantry stand is a Section. The 'army' is typically a battalion/battlegroup. It sits roughly between the 1:1 rulesets such as FoW and the 'operational' sets such as Command Decision or Spearhead, where each stand is a platoon.
 

Auld-Yin

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Well part from the fact I was in a Lowland Regiment........ :rolleyes:
 

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