Military Modelling - Humber Pig

#1
Hi, wondered if anyone could help. Modelling a 1/35 humber pig with a couple of mechanics next to it. The front doors look really heavy, does anyone remember if they chocked the doors open to prevent crush injuries, if so what? also was there a common fault with the flying wings that frequently needed repair? i can imagine the hinge points taking quite a strain.
any help appreciated
 
#2
Gents, I'm currently working on an LRDG Chevy model. This is a photo frame of one that someone is displaying on youtube.
My question is; What are these long poles, and what would they have been used for?
Cheers.
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#3
To spread camo net I would guess.
 
#5
F***. I didn't think of that!
Cheers bud.
Are you sure they are poles? They look a bit wide to me to be poles. Could they be for putting under the wheels when the get bogged down in the sand?
 
#6
Are you sure they are poles? They look a bit wide to me to be poles. Could they be for putting under the wheels when the get bogged down in the sand?
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Should have gone to specsavers. That board a little bit further down would be for putting under the wheels.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
They are the Antennae poles for the radio a No 11 set normally a short aerial was used, but the range was only 20 miles, so for car to car comms ok
but to send and recieve morse back to base they rigged up the poles with supoprt wires and fitted a Windom antennae between them
 
#8
Hi, wondered if anyone could help. Modelling a 1/35 humber pig with a couple of mechanics next to it. The front doors look really heavy, does anyone remember if they chocked the doors open to prevent crush injuries, if so what? also was there a common fault with the flying wings that frequently needed repair? i can imagine the hinge points taking quite a strain.
any help appreciated
...not that I recall.. there was a very heavy door stop to prevent the doors slamming into the wings, but no, you just had to make sure everything was tucked in when you leaped in and slammed the door.. The windows hinged vertically with a metal rod handle on the inside that poked your shoulder when going round corners.. and the front flap was raised by a hydraulic ram at the side of the seat. The hinges were massive and were I think beefed up when they added extra armour.. On reflection, it was probably pretty sensible that we wore flak jackets and helmets in them..

You closed the window by turning the valve tap... you had to be quick as the kids in Belfast could get a milk bottle through the hatch from 30m... little tykes!
 
#9
Are you sure they are poles? They look a bit wide to me to be poles. Could they be for putting under the wheels when the get bogged down in the sand?
No. Definately not mate. You would use sand channels for that.
 
#15
...not that I recall.. there was a very heavy door stop to prevent the doors slamming into the wings, but no, you just had to make sure everything was tucked in when you leaped in and slammed the door.. The windows hinged vertically with a metal rod handle on the inside that poked your shoulder when going round corners.. and the front flap was raised by a hydraulic ram at the side of the seat. The hinges were massive and were I think beefed up when they added extra armour.. On reflection, it was probably pretty sensible that we wore flak jackets and helmets in them..

You closed the window by turning the valve tap... you had to be quick as the kids in Belfast could get a milk bottle through the hatch from 30m... little tykes!
LOL ....i didnt explain very well. if you were parked up, in the base, working around the doors, would you be able to prevent the doors slamming shut on your delicate little pinkies? i want to position the doors open to show off the interior, and just wondered about the actual weight of them and precautions you would take....
 
#16
LOL ....i didnt explain very well. if you were parked up, in the base, working around the doors, would you be able to prevent the doors slamming shut on your delicate little pinkies? i want to position the doors open to show off the interior, and just wondered about the actual weight of them and precautions you would take....
No... doors were either open or closed. If the waggon was parked on the flat, it could be either, if it was on a slope, they would swing open or closed depending on the slope..!

In those days, the welfare of your pinkies was your own problem.. Pigs were never delicate, precision vehicles with features like shock absorbers or soft trim - think of a safe on wheels - heavy, solid and totally unforgiving..
 
#17
Worth doing with the doors open for the "Pig" face look from the front.
Hatches and vision blocks varied from little flat metal "doors" to blocks with thick glass vision slits, and there was a version for the front nearside hatch to which four 1 1/2" flare pistols could be fitted in order to fire 4 baton rounds at the same time.
I think it was 1972 that Pigs had an extra layer of armour fitted internally.
Pigs used within the same sub unit would have different fittings, and some would have brigade or other insignia applied, some not.
A technicolour range of paint bomb splats was common livery at times.
 
#18
No... doors were either open or closed. If the waggon was parked on the flat, it could be either, if it was on a slope, they would swing open or closed depending on the slope..!

In those days, the welfare of your pinkies was your own problem.. Pigs were never delicate, precision vehicles with features like shock absorbers or soft trim - think of a safe on wheels - heavy, solid and totally unforgiving..
Especially over speed bumps - hooks bounce out of fittings on rear doors and they slam on you, rear hatch bounces down and up on its springs while you've got your rifle barrels sticking out of it - smashed rifle stocks.
I saw one of my mates take a flying leap into the back of a pig, forgetting that it'd just been fitted with one of the new inches thick vision blocks - took a neat patch of scalp and hair off him.
 
#19
#20
No... doors were either open or closed. If the waggon was parked on the flat, it could be either, if it was on a slope, they would swing open or closed depending on the slope..!

In those days, the welfare of your pinkies was your own problem.. Pigs were never delicate, precision vehicles with features like shock absorbers or soft trim - think of a safe on wheels - heavy, solid and totally unforgiving..
Can you imagine them now in a world of H&S ..... interiors covered with pink foam, no sharp edges, warning labels all over, those rubber strips around all the closing surfaces to stop fingers getting caught ........nah!

on another point, did the lads get away with customising the interiors with pictures of their favourite page-3 girl? or is that just for the Yanks (oh er missus! pun unintended)
 

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