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MIlitary E-mail Etiquette

#1
With the increased use of the e-mail as a form of communication, I am questioning what is the correct form of title to those who would address in conversation as "Sir"

My view, if you know the recipient, is to refer to him/her by name eg Major Bloggs". If you e-mail is addressed to more than one individual you should use the fomat "Gentlemen" or on occasions of informality "Gents"

However I am increasingly seeing e-mails addressed to "Sirs" or even worse "Sir's". I believe this to be wrong.

I have also seen e-mails addressed to "Sirs, Gentlemen", presumably to differentiate between those of senior rank to the writer and those of junior or equal rank.

Presumably this would would lead to "Mesdames, Sirs, Ladies and Gentlemen" if addressing recipients of both sexes!
 

mysteron

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
Doesn't JSP 101 cover this off?

Personally, there is nothing wrong with demonstrating deference of rank in e-mails where appropriate:

An example,

Brigadier, Colonel & Gentlemen,

I am pleased to inform you that we raised over £1m for Help for Heroes during the naked ARRSE crawl in Upper Snodsbury. Thank you all for your support and aspire to organise a similar event for later this year....

This would suggest that a Major or Captain wrote the note and was deferring to his seniors and remaining polite to his peers and juniors. Perfectly acceptable as good manners are involved. Just my thoughts.
 
#6
As far as I'm concerned emails are an informal method of communication. If there are several addressees of varying ranks I find a 'Sirs, Gents' works well enough. (I haven't been picked up for it anyway :) )
 
#7
hi
cnt do ths wknd. btr lk nxt tym.


Or however it goes...


Actually, I'll throw an addition into the system. For my OC, I use "Boss," as a salutation. More remote superiors get "Sir," though one day I'll probably make a Freudian slip and spell it "C-U-R" :)
 
#9
Personally I do the Sirs/Gents thing to fellow seniors and rank/name to JNCOs etc however
I see a crab air SNCO addressed my boss as Major XXXXX

Necky Twats
 
#10
It is, of course, easier to just ignore the salutation and just get on with what you're trying to say.

It's an email, not a forking letter ...

Could we consider that option? ;-)
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#11
blue-sophist said:
It is, of course, easier to just ignore the salutation and just get on with what you're trying to say.

It's an email, not a forking letter ...

Could we consider that option? ;-)
My thoughts - and actions - exactly. I neer address them in any way. I start by saying what I want say, then just end.

Otherwise to much farting about.
 
#14
STREetwise said:
With the increased use of the e-mail as a form of communication, I am questioning what is the correct form of title to those who would address in conversation as "Sir"

My view, if you know the recipient, is to refer to him/her by name eg Major Bloggs". If you e-mail is addressed to more than one individual you should use the fomat "Gentlemen" or on occasions of informality "Gents"

However I am increasingly seeing e-mails addressed to "Sirs" or even worse "Sir's". I believe this to be wrong.

I have also seen e-mails addressed to "Sirs, Gentlemen", presumably to differentiate between those of senior rank to the writer and those of junior or equal rank.

Presumably this would would lead to "Mesdames, Sirs, Ladies and Gentlemen" if addressing recipients of both sexes!
My bold - "gents is where one goes for a piss machiavelli - not a form of address" - Commanding officer to mach as a young staff officer
 
#15
3milesniper said:
Personally I do the Sirs/Gents thing to fellow seniors and rank/name to JNCOs etc however
I see a crab air SNCO addressed my boss as Major XXXXX

Necky ****
don't know how appropriate it would be to put kisses in an email at work.
 
#16
I love the ones that start:

Gerry,

Thanks for this.


They usually go on to rant and rave at the original author for getting hold of the wrong end of the stick or some other issue that has pissed the sender off in some way or another.
 
#18
Fraser said:
blue-sophist said:
Taffnp said:
Do e mails have to be in a certain font and size ?
NO

cnut

Just legible ... :wink:
Actually, JSP101 states:

Despite its informality, email has the same purpose and status as any official document...
In accordance with DW, you should use Arial. JSP 101 doesn't cover the font size, but Arial 11 point is the DW standard.
Dear Fraser,

One stands both corrected and enlightened.

Regards,

Blue-Sophist
Old Git
for Whatitsworth

:lol:
 
#20
You could of course use that utterly dull convention adopted by those inspiring members of the Civil Secretariat and address your audience as 'Dear Colleagues'. Good combat indicator of the futile message to come and usually results in one hitting the delete button before reading further.
 

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