Military Book of the Year 2008 Shortlist

#1
http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/D...stForArmysFirstMilitaryBookOfTheYearAward.htm

The following have been nominated for the British Army Military Book of the Year 2008 award:

PADDY ASHDOWN
Swords and ploughshares: bringing peace to the 21st Century

CHRIS BELLAMY
Absolute war: Soviet Russia in the Second World War

PATRICK BISHOP
3 Para, Afghanistan, Summer 2006

DAVID HART DYKE
Four weeks in May: the loss of HMS Coventry - a Captain’s story

MAX HASTINGS
Nemesis: the battle for Japan, 1944-45

CHRIS HUNTER
Eight lives down: the story of a counter-terrorist bomb-disposal operator’s tour in Iraq

IAN KERSHAW
Fateful choices: Ten decisions that changed the world, 1940-1941

EDWARD PAICE
Tip and run: the untold tragedy of the Great War in Africa

JONATHON RILEY
Napoleon as a general

MICHAEL ROSE
Washington’s war: from independence to Iraq
 
#2
Beggar it!! I take it mine isn't up for the award then?!?!?! Mind you it may not even be in the library!!!!Damn. 8O
 
#3
As long as Chris Hunters work of fiction doesn't get it.
 
#4
CHRIS BELLAMY
Absolute war: Soviet Russia in the Second World War

PATRICK BISHOP
3 Para, Afghanistan, Summer 2006

has to be out of these two surely?
 
#5
dingerr said:
As long as Chris Hunters work of fiction doesn't get it.
I read it and thought it was a "bit" Warry, what up with it?
 
#6
When I saw the thread title I intended proposing Mike Rose's book Washington's War, of which he signed a copy for me- so very pleased to see it made the shortlist. Rose is just about the soundest chap on the planet and if our esteemed and powerful leaders would read/listen to what he has to say perhaps the US and it's lapdog would be making better choices.
So for the most valuable contribution to military affairs via literature in 2008 it has to be this book and this great man.
 
#7
actiontoday said:
When I saw the thread title I intended proposing Mike Rose's book Washington's War, of which he signed a copy for me- so very pleased to see it made the shortlist. Rose is just about the soundest chap on the planet and if our esteemed and powerful leaders would read/listen to what he has to say perhaps the US and it's lapdog would be making better choices.
So for the most valuable contribution to military affairs via literature in 2008 it has to be this book and this great man.
I'll second that , well said!
 
#11
Mr Happy said:
dingerr said:
As long as Chris Hunters work of fiction doesn't get it.
c'mon - spill!
I concur.
Has his ghost-writer bigged-him-up a tad too much?
 
#13
dingerr said:
As long as Chris Hunters work of fiction doesn't get it.
I'm all for books about the military - but I can't stand officers bullshtting about their heroics.

The problem with this shortlist is that it gives credibility and respectability to a book that doesn't deserve it. Defence should not be promoting one man's ego and a ghost writer's imagination.

That said, there are a couple of excellent books on the list and I hope they win it.
 
#14
Ed Paice's book is probably not going to win it or be bigged up on here, because the East African campaign is not "sexy" unless, paradoxically, you have read it up. However I have to say his book on theGreat War's African chapter is absolutely amazing. Some of the exploits - on both sides - make the LRDG and the SAS look pretty pappy by comparison.

The "naval" dimension to the war is by itself totally gob-smacking.

So I'm voting for Paice.

(Best thing about 3 Para - picture on the cover...poor effort and very sensationalist unlike the 3 Para effort!)
 
#15
Just as a bit of a bump:

Voting opens on Monday 2 June 2008 and closes on Friday 5 September 2008, with the winner announced in October. The presentation to the winner will be made at the Prince Consort's Library, Aldershot.
 
#16
whyohwhy said:
dingerr said:
As long as Chris Hunters work of fiction doesn't get it.
I'm all for books about the military - but I can't stand officers bullshtting about their heroics.

The problem with this shortlist is that it gives credibility and respectability to a book that doesn't deserve it. Defence should not be promoting one man's ego and a ghost writer's imagination.

That said, there are a couple of excellent books on the list and I hope they win it.
Chris Hunter was awarded a QGM so I don't think his courage is in question. However I found the book difficult to read and I would say that he probably wrote it himself: it didn't have that 'slick' feel which a professional writer would have brought.

I can't comment on the incidents described in the book because I wasn't there, but on literary merit alone I'm surprised to see it on this list.
 

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