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Michelin stars-what do they mean?

That sounds about right, I reckon to normally pay £100-£125 per person including wine for a good taster menu with wine flight.

I expect prices to rise in all businesses, but that’s only fair.
 
I don’t understand wine, I guess my palette isn’t sophisticated enough to differentiate the flavours. I have noticed selected wines with tasting menus, but the price is pushed up significantly.

Is it worth going for the selected wines as a learning experience or will it simply be a waste on a wine heathen such as myself?



These aren't cheap, in fact bloody pricy, I would have loved to have gone to one of their Burgundy lunches/dinners. sadly when I was able to afford it, they were normally booked six or more months ahead.
 

Imago

Old-Salt
These aren't cheap, in fact bloody pricy, I would have loved to have gone to one of their Burgundy lunches/dinners. sadly when I was able to afford it, they were normally booked six or more months ahead.
Worth it if you get the chance. I have a wealthy friend who is one of their valued customers and have in his company attended a dinner in the Napoleon cellar. Was really a wine tasting accompanied by (fairly grand) food. Superb experience.
 
Cellars = steps. No good for me.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I think that the circumstances also impinge on the eating experience. In Anthony Bourdain's 'A cook's tour' he mentions this aspect of eating at the end.

Consider an egg banjo on RAOC bread with marge and OMD 80 thumbprint at rainy o'clock on radio stag. Now imagine the same food at a starred restaurant by the beach in the south of France.

I'd say that a Michelin star is a very good indicator of what to expect but I still fail to see how a star can be spread to a franchise. I remember reading an article, possibly Punch where various celebrity restaurants were visited and the staff asked if the named chef was in and if not when they'd last been there. The answers were not encouraging.

Gordon Ramsey has around 45 eateries spread all over the world. Heston Blumenthal 5 (plus closing down twice after norovirus outbreaks 2009 and 2014 in two different locations*).

Both good chefs but spreading themselves so thin that, like homeopathic remedies, only the memory of their efficacy can be present.

*I have no idea if that affected his ratings.
ramseys stuff was made centrally in a warehouse and bused out to his london gaffs like a standard pub chain menu, if memory serves. he got a lot of stick over it.
 
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Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
Cellars = steps. No good for me.
I thought daleks could fly now? did you not get the update to your 'wheelbarrow' mod.

as a point of reference and a cheap claim the yeo valley yogurt factory has a michelin starred chef running their canteen and civvies are allowed in as well. great views and the nosh is good.
 
I thought daleks could fly now? did you not get the update to your 'wheelbarrow' mod.

as a point of reference and a cheap claim the yeo valley yogurt factory has a michelin starred chef running their canteen and civvies are allowed in as well. great views and the nosh is good.

It’s in Bristol. You want me to go to Bristol? You sick fück.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I think that the circumstances also impinge on the eating experience. In Anthony Bourdain's 'A cook's tour' he mentions this aspect of eating at the end.

Consider an egg banjo on RAOC bread with marge and OMD 80 thumbprint at rainy o'clock on radio stag. Now imagine the same food at a starred restaurant by the beach in the south of France.

I'd say that a Michelin star is a very good indicator of what to expect but I still fail to see how a star can be spread to a franchise. I remember reading an article, possibly Punch where various celebrity restaurants were visited and the staff asked if the named chef was in and if not when they'd last been there. The answers were not encouraging.

Gordon Ramsey has around 45 eateries spread all over the world. Heston Blumenthal 5 (plus closing down twice after norovirus outbreaks 2009 and 2014 in two different locations*).

Both good chefs but spreading themselves so thin that, like homeopathic remedies, only the memory of their efficacy can be present.

*I have no idea if that affected his ratings.
Not necessarily so, I've eaten at 3 of Adam Handling's restaurants on various occasions, granted he's not MIchelin starred, and he's always seemed to be in the kitchen or wandering the restaurant on most of them. I've partaken of his food at St Ermins (where I first met him) and been to both of his Frog restaurants. The wife organised a lunch for us at the Frog Spitalfield for my birthday and enquired when he would be there as she had bought his book "Smile or get out of the kitchen" for my birthday and wanted him to sign it. he came out of the kitchen with the final course of the taster menu and sat with us for around 10 minutes and even bought us a birthday drink before he left to go back to work., Great bloke, very friendly and always willing to talk to his customers.
 
I'm sure you'll fit in the "dumb waiter" if you leave your chariot upstairs :mrgreen:

You wouldn’t dare say that to you missus, otherwise you’d be joining me in the men with no balls club.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer

Jammy66

War Hero
I went to France with a group of friends for a boozing/eating weekend. Whilst most were stopping in a nice but very expensive hotel I opted to book my own place and found a central but much cheaper place (just around the corner from the expensive hotel) which turned out to be rooms above a cafe.

The cafe looked nice and they did a very reasonably priced set menu so on the first night, because it was getting late and people just wanted to eat we decided to try 'my' place. It was superb!

The Saturday night was a Michelin starred place, first I'd been to. The place had no atmosphere, although it looked very smart, service was slow and the food was good but not great. We all agreed (on the way home) the little cafe on the first night was the best meal of the trip.

So, my take is that a Michelin star should be a guarantee of getting a certain standard of service and food, but it's not a guarantee of enjoyment.
 
I don’t understand wine, I guess my palette isn’t sophisticated enough to differentiate the flavours. I have noticed selected wines with tasting menus, but the price is pushed up significantly.

Is it worth going for the selected wines as a learning experience or will it simply be a waste on a wine heathen such as myself?

There was a series where James May explored wine with some wine expert. Could be worth hunting it out
 
Many years ago I went out with a very posh bird who one night wanted to go out for a nice mea. So like a mug I told her to pick where we went. Sadly for me the place had two sodding stars the scoff ok but not a lot of it. When the bill arrived I almost had a heart attack being as it was close to pay day I was slightly short so the overdraft kicked in £250 for a cheap bottle of wine thought me to never tell a bird to order the wine whilst I went got a pee. She was an awesome bird and I set my heart on marrying her sadly she turned me down as I was not in her social circle just her bit of rough on the side. In one way I was glad as only being a full screw at the time I would have been bankrupted by her.
 
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