Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Michelin stars-what do they mean?

Money talks.

Like you have no idea...a chef pâtissier can get a salary of 150,00 Euros P.A in a luxury hotel....a Michelin-starred chef up to 600,000 Euros P.A according to a recent article in the French press

 
We ate at Gleneagles Michelin starred restaurant when Andrew Fairlie was cooking there. The food was absolutely superb, an elegant sufficiency thereof. The service was brilliant, almost a piece of theatre just for us. To dismiss starred places as serving miniature portions of pretentious food is just inverted snobbery.
 
An example of the carte of a 3-star restaurant located in Paris, named Apicius.

The English version comes just after the French one.
 

Attachments

  • Apicius_carte-fevrier-2020.pdf
    130.2 KB · Views: 72
There's a certain MasterChef judge from these parts who me and Bessy mate used to chuck bags of spuds at with his brother way back when( kind of a macho hillbilly thing)
They both boxed, I made the mistake of putting on a pair of gloves on one evening for a dare...
I saw his stars that night!

Mate's 60 next year, we're off down to see just how good he really is.
His older brother caters privately up here, they reckon he's the better cook.
Meanwhile our local multimillionaire neighbour has just been awarded their second star.
£300 for a tasting menu, it's rather stretching it 'oop ere' good job there's alot of footballer wives types!
£80 gets the 'standard' set five course...
It's not outlandish for what you get, you just sit in the 'barn' instead of the 'hall' and you forego the 'local provenance' lecture.
I can cope being not told about my coos, spuds and FECKIN WOODPIGEONS for two hundred quid.
 
We ate at Gleneagles Michelin starred restaurant when Andrew Fairlie was cooking there. The food was absolutely superb, an elegant sufficiency thereof. The service was brilliant, almost a piece of theatre just for us. To dismiss starred places as serving miniature portions of pretentious food is just inverted snobbery.
Like I said...only place 'michelin' I've ate was n Iceland and...I reckon it cost around £150. Was a 'tasting menu'.

I could not fault any of it.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Used to work with a Michelin starred chef in Glasgow, as Head Bartender, I was the only member of staff never to get bollocked by him during the whole time I worked with him, all chefs are grumpy *******. He would give me full run of the kitchens on Sundays and Mondays to develop syrups, tinctures, reductions and whatever other hair brained ideas could come up with to improve our in house cocktail menu. It was an absolute brilliant time. Learned loads from him.

And for those whom complain of tiny courses and extortionate prices, his menu was far from it, generous plates, without being overwhelming, and reasonable prices.
 
Last edited:
An example of the carte of a 3-star restaurant located in Paris, named Apicius.

The English version comes just after the French one.
Gen question...does the French version seem pretentious in it's explanation to your ears?
 
*This is not a thread about slagging off, it is about gaining understanding.
 
You either look a bit like Alan Partridge or....failed the test in your naval career path.

Now, do you have a bit of Alan Partridge about yourself?
You'll never be a "proper officer" otherwise :)

AH HA!!!!!
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
*This is not a thread about slagging off, it is about gaining understanding.

At it's heart the Stars are about doing food really, really well, it's not all nouvelle cuisine or molecular gastronomy, you get Michelin Stars for Streetfood, Pubs, Bistros not just swanky restaurants.
 
Gen question...does the French version seem pretentious in it's explanation to your ears?

Yes sometimes it does but it is also nice to know what you are going to eat. Also, some people who will only dine once in their lives in such restaurant appreciate to read that the will not pay 30 Euros for a "Gâteau au chocolat with vanilla sauce and cream on top" but instead will enjoy a "Soufflé extraordinaire, glace à la vanille Bourbon, crème juste fouettée"....it's part of the experience

Some average restaurants have tried to emulate the style with things like "The carrousel of deserts" which means you get left overs on a plate of the "Sea crust" where you have left over fish with bread crumbs...
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I guess it's a life choice. Personally I like the Harvester all you can eat breakfast for 10 quid.
 
Yes sometimes it does but it is also nice to know what you are going to eat. Also, some people who will only dine once in their lives in such restaurant appreciate to read that the will not pay 30 Euros for a "Gâteau au chocolat with vanilla sauce and cream on top" but instead will enjoy a "Soufflé extraordinaire, glace à la vanille Bourbon, crème juste fouettée"....it's part of the experience

Some average restaurants have tried to emulate the style with things like "The carrousel of deserts" which means you get left overs on a plate of the "Sea crust" where you have left over fish with bread crumbs...

I dont know whether you are in UK or not...

Have you ever gone into a restaurant, heard French "waffling" and just thought "oh shut up?!"

I base this on stuff I've watched online and places pretending to have a sniff of French about them.
 

Oyibo

LE
I dont know whether you are in UK or not...

Have you ever gone into a restaurant, heard French "waffling" and just thought "oh shut up?!"

I base this on stuff I've watched online and places pretending to have a sniff of French about them.

There's definitely pretentiousness in some, though not all. For those 'Anglo-Saxons' living in France this video might resonate:

 
No I live in France.

What is important is that you don't get bullied because you don't understand. If the staff is professional, they are happy to inform, explain, detail. If you have questions, ask, ask, ask, it shows you are interested and appreciative, that you are not just here to stuff your face.

I always inquire about what I eat; more and more chef now include the origin not just of beef, like it used to be with the mad cow, but of everything. For the restaurateurs, it's a source of pride to show the customers that they have given thought to all the details and that they work with responsible purveyors.

I have a restaurant opposite my place; the menu gives the name of the boat the fishes have been caught by, the name and location of the farmer providing the vegetables, the dairy products, etc. And the 3-course lunch is 26 Euros with nothing but very good, locally sourced products.

Same with the wine. Listen to advices but drink what you like, not what you are told.
 

mercurydancer

LE
Book Reviewer
I work at a hotel which has a 1 star Michelin. My wife has a far developed palate than mine and does rate it highly, although she rates a local restaurant much more, simply because the local restaurant is dependent on its own farm produce* and the local one peel their own spuds and has their own farm meat. Far superior to a Michelin restaurant.


*And I can tell you that the Michelin restaurant has shock horror processed stuff in as I am in the food check in area every morning. We have three restaurants, and two of them serve burgers. The burgers actually come from a well known wholesale butcher in Sedgefield. Exactly the same as I can buy for 3 quid for 4 and the burger at the hotel is about 17 quid.
 

DTBA

War Hero
Went to one in Belgium by accident.

It was very good. Crucially, it was served in large amounts. Proper amounts. Fat bloke portions. You would need to be an American to consider it undersized. They had chips and mayonnaise and good beer, too, so I didn't have to pretend I knew anything about wine. I will, one day, return with a wallet full of Euros and eat the rest of the menu.
 
Top