Michael Ryan, Hungerford and 'Them'...

Please don't tell me your in the police with a comment like that, as the first duty of a constable is to save life and limb!
I was for a few years. And to be honest, the gungho, movie based, commando comic training manual attitude of some firearms trained and specialist firearms officers left a lot to be desired. I add to that statement that those particular officers had normally never been in the military before plod service, they were normally life insurance or used car salesmen who had made a pension based career move into plod.
 
To stop the thread de-railing I can confirm that Firearms Officers can self Authorise however it is extremely rare for them to do so as they are not Proactive officers they are Reactive and are deployed by an Officer of the rank of Inspector or above to respond to and deal with incidents where there is a significant risk to life which may require a firearms resolution.

They maintain the right to self authorise only in case there is a break down in communication with said Inspector.
 
I am old enough to remember the cock-up that was the Prudom events. A copper said afterwards that "... there was a stone of lead in him". The sound track of the media sounded like the last five minutes of the Bonnie & Clyde movie.

At the inquest, the Coroner said there was (apart from his own bullet in the heid) one buckshot pellet in the body. Brilliant tracking drills by the ex-soldier, though.
 
Legaly, unless they were being fired upon tis Murder
So I'm stagging on the front gate one night when someone starts brassing up the civvie housing estate opposite camp. I have to stand there watching him slotting people because to fire on him would be murder? Despite the Yellow Card stating quite clearly that I may open fire to protect the lives of myself or others?
 
Reference the Hungerford incident, don't know about THEM but no-one made any real effort to track down and mallet the git until he had stopped running around. Perhaps the filth knew he was already not a threat any more? Or were they just a pack of scaredy-cats who stayed clear until ordered in to contain him? Much more likely the second than the first, unfortunately.

I have made it a personal objective when I finally shuffle off, to track down Ryan and Hamilton and convey them personally to the nethermost regions of Hell, on behalf of all the legal shooters whose honourable and lawful sport was curtailed. I may also find time to haunt or otherwise emotionally torture the politicians who caved in to the baying of the mob.

Zere names vill also go on ze list.
 
Reference the Hungerford incident, don't know about THEM but no-one made any real effort to track down and mallet the git until he had stopped running around. Perhaps the filth knew he was already not a threat any more? Or were they just a pack of scaredy-cats who stayed clear until ordered in to contain him? Much more likely the second than the first, unfortunately.
Considering your average 1980s copper was armed with two foot of shiny wood and a pointy hat, I wouldn't have been overly enthusiastic about tracking and containing a lunatic with an AK either.
 
Considering your average 1980s copper was armed with two foot of shiny wood and a pointy hat, I wouldn't have been overly enthusiastic about tracking and containing a lunatic with an AK either.
I was referring to the armed officers who stood around at the edge of the town waiting for a report of his presence rather than going to find him. It is, however, the duty of even an unarmed officer to attempt to locate such an individual. The police were made of sterner stuff in those days, supposedly.
 
Considering your average 1980s copper was armed with two foot of shiny wood and a pointy hat
They could have used said items to buy time by engaging him in kinky sexual frolics whilst waiting for armed support.

No initiative, modern coppers, see? Dixon of Dock Green would have been in there with the KY and rubber drawers in the twinkling of an eye.
 
I am old enough to remember the cock-up that was the Prudom events. A copper said afterwards that "... there was a stone of lead in him". The sound track of the media sounded like the last five minutes of the Bonnie & Clyde movie.

At the inquest, the Coroner said there was (apart from his own bullet in the heid) one buckshot pellet in the body. Brilliant tracking drills by the ex-soldier, though.
Yes - I remember seeing a documentary that indicated that once he was tracked down and discovered to be in a lean to the plod were lined up and shall we say delivered surpressing fire in a fashion that would leave today's "Guardianistas" wailing and weeping for weeks. I think the doc was on Channel 5 - so pinch of salt needs to be taken.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
Would I be right in thinking that armed police are rarely trained in "combat" as in fire and manoeuvre and so on? Usually their training is limited to static cordon style training? Obviously there are the hostage rescue/raid teams, but otherwise it's "shoot back but stay where I am" stuff.

Further to my hypothetical earlier, I think the scenario I had in mind was along lines of an army unit on way to the plain passing hungerford before coppers get there. They see what's occurring and on their own initiative stop, bomb up and then engage and kill the shooter.
Would they be for the high jump or tea and medals?
 
Barry Prudom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

That reads like a thriller. Surprised i have never heard of this, especially with the whole Raoul Moat thing.
In my defence, i was 4 in 1982...
There was a football chant about him around Yorkshire at the time to the tune of 'London Bridge is falling down':

Barry Prudom is our friend, is our friend, is our friend, Barry Prudom is our friend, he kills coppers!'

It got more of a rise out of them than 'who's that twat with a nipple on his hat'! :-D
 
To stop the thread de-railing I can confirm that Firearms Officers can self Authorise however it is extremely rare for them to do so as they are not Proactive officers they are Reactive and are deployed by an Officer of the rank of Inspector or above to respond to and deal with incidents where there is a significant risk to life which may require a firearms resolution.

They maintain the right to self authorise only in case there is a break down in communication with said Inspector.
CJ, I seem to remember reading that the final decision whether or not to open fire is left to the AFO, because he/she will be the one who may have to justify the decision in a court of law, while under oath. In other words, no senior officer, no matter what their rank, has the right to order a FO to shoot. Is this correct, or am I just going senile in my old age?:oops:
 
There was a football chant about him around Yorkshire at the time to the tune of 'London Bridge is falling down':

Barry Prudom is our friend, is our friend, is our friend, Barry Prudom is our friend, he kills coppers!'

It got more of a rise out of them than 'who's that twat with a nipple on his hat'! :-D
That particular chant pre-dates Mr Prudom by a couple of decades...

Harry Roberts is our friend
Is our friend, is our friend
Harry Robert is our friend
He kills coppers!

Come on Harry, kill some more
Kill some more, kill some more
Come on Harry kill some more
Kill more coppers!
 
I was under the impression that it was the RUC who despatched Barry Prudom and that they had been called in because of their familiarity with a wider variety of weaponry that North Yorks Police.
 
That particular chant pre-dates Mr Prudom by a couple of decades...

Harry Roberts is our friend
Is our friend, is our friend
Harry Robert is our friend
He kills coppers!

Come on Harry, kill some more
Kill some more, kill some more
Come on Harry kill some more
Kill more coppers!
I love the ethmology of footie chants! Who the **** is Harry Roberts though?
 
I love the ethmology of footie chants! Who the **** is Harry Roberts though?
Harry Roberts served in Malaya with the Rifle Brigade. In civilian life he became a career criminal, and in 1966 during an armed robbery he and an accomplice shot dead three police officers.

Roberts fled to Epping Forest where he used his military training and experience to elude capture for three months. He was eventually captured and sentenced to Life Imprisonment; he still in Littlehay HMP today.
 
It's called Eye of the Storm, by Peter Radcliffe. Google is your friend.
Peter Radcliffe doesn't refer to this incident in his book that I could find. He does describe how the SAS stormed a Scottish nick. Although that's the SAS being used in a domestic incident, it's obviously nothing related to the Hungerford episode.
 

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