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Mexico - Narco-state in the making?

I guess they witnessed something they shouldn't have.

'A retired couple on holiday in northern Mexico have been found in a well just days after the pair were reported missing to authorities.

'77-year-old Ian Hirschsohn and 74-yearold Kathy Harvey were found in Baja, after police discovered the couple’s vehicle in Ensenada earlier in the week. According to CBS, the pair had been staying in a small coastal community about three hours south of the U.S.-Mexico border. “They are now confirmed deceased in Mexico and family has been notified,” a SDPD spokesperson wrote in an email to News 8.

'Mrs Hervey’s son, Robert, reportedly received a text from his mother who said she and Mr Hirschsohn were planning on exploring a local gold mine or possibly visit a beach in the lead up to their disappearance.'


 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Used to visit the area during tour in Belize late 1980's things were not as bad then but obviously a lot of police security activity.

The use of Belize as a point of egress for cocaine and heroin has only happened really in the last decade, since the traditionally easy route of Juarez and the other border towns have been stoppered up by Mexican army instead of corrupt police.

Having said that, what is corruption? In Mexico, they try to gain compliance through bribery and if that doesn't work, then by fear.

Whilst I love the idea that I would be "Untouchable" like Eliot Ness when confronted by the cartels, if they threatened my family and showed me a picture of my back garden with the kids playing in it, I fear that I would look the other way when required.
 

Issi

War Hero
Although they are novels, one would think that Don Winslows books give an idea of the Mexican/American drug issues.
The Power of the Dog is a fantastic read.
 
I guess they witnessed something they shouldn't have.

'A retired couple on holiday in northern Mexico have been found in a well just days after the pair were reported missing to authorities.

'77-year-old Ian Hirschsohn and 74-yearold Kathy Harvey were found in Baja, after police discovered the couple’s vehicle in Ensenada earlier in the week. According to CBS, the pair had been staying in a small coastal community about three hours south of the U.S.-Mexico border. “They are now confirmed deceased in Mexico and family has been notified,” a SDPD spokesperson wrote in an email to News 8.

'Mrs Hervey’s son, Robert, reportedly received a text from his mother who said she and Mr Hirschsohn were planning on exploring a local gold mine or possibly visit a beach in the lead up to their disappearance.'



It’s not like the violence stops at the Border either. An illegal pot grow close to Temecula in CA, was raided by cartels/Mexican mafia. One got away and raised the alarm, but died later - 8 dead total.

Likely no one will ever be brought to justice either.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
But he bought one with iron sights!

Because the old Colt Industries lies about the SA80 just don't want to go away, I happened to see something on the ludicrous Quora site which says it much more eloquently than me:


The British Army's SA80 A1 was regarded as a joke weapon. Is the current SA80 A3 an improvement? Why?


I used both the A1 and A2 as an infantry soldier. I used the A1 in Northern Ireland, and the A2 in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as constant in unit training and exercises for over 20 years. I was a skill at arms instructor and taught the use of both weapons. I am not an armchair general (though ironically I am typing from an armchair).
The A1 was simply a poor weapon. Anyone who tells you otherwise either didn't use it much, were one of the lucky few who had a good example or have never used anything else to compare it to.
It was accurate but spectacularly unreliable. It was not uncommon to have at least one stoppage in each mag, especially when using blanks. Live fire was a bit more reliable but not much. Users became very adept at clearing stoppages quickly. The design of the cocking handle was such that it deflected cases back into the ejection port. The welding on the bolt carrier guide was poor, causing warping over time. The firing pins may as well have been made of glass, and it became SOP to carry a spare in the cleaning kit. The issue RG magazines were thin aluminium which dented easily and had a shallow follower which was prone to tilting which stopped rounds feeding properly. Constant cleaning was needed to get it to fire, however this caused wear in certain areas which created further issues. The gas plug had failure points which could break, particularly in the little recess ring (anyone who has cleaned the gas parts will know the bit I mean), and there were reports of gas plugs having catastrophic failures and blasting out the front of the weapon. They could also be put in the wrong way when cleaning which needed an armourer to drill them out. The list goes on. Troops were deploying with a weapon they had no trust in and which could not be guaranteed to fire when needed. This is a big deal.

HK took a look at the weapon and made changes to virtually every working part. The resultant A2 was a world of difference. The mean rounds between failure (MRBF) was more than double of it's closest competitor in testing. There were a couple of hiccups when deployed with the Marines but this was found to be a problem with the cleaning regimen used. Once rectified the rifle was found to be one of, if not *the*, most reliable rifles in its class. We couldn't believe the difference when we got them. Stoppages were extremely rare and it just worked.



There are some issues inherent to the rifle design which cannot be changed. It is right handed only. The ergonomics of some of the controls leave a lot to be desired. It is also heavy compared to an AR or AK, however, as much of the weight is at the rear, this is not as much of an issue as some would have you believe. With training, the above issues are easily overcome.


The A3 is a further improvement. Some more changes were made to welding, new sight rails were added and a new front hand guard is used. It is also a flat dark earth colour as standard.


In short the SA80A3 is very reliable and very accurate.

Is it the best rifle in the World? That depends on what “best” means to you.

If you like lightweight rifles that fire from both shoulders then probably not.

If you like rifles that go bang when you squeeze the trigger and which allow you to own the infantry quarter mile then it meets the criteria.

I have total trust in the weapon because it has proved itself to me when it counts, and that's good enough for me.




Ray W.

Updated 4h ago
Former Infantry SNCO at British Army


---------------------------- ---------------------------- ends -----------------------------

Okay - I think we're done here....now, back to the records....
 
snip

Watch "Sicario" and "Narcos Mexico" for a taste of what these people are like, or visit the excellent (but endangered) www.borderlandbeat.com.

Just been reading the borderlandbeat website...

Very sobering and mind bogglingly horrifying...

...and people complain about living in the UK...
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Because the old Colt Industries lies about the SA80 just don't want to go away, I happened to see something on the ludicrous Quora site which says it much more eloquently than me:


The British Army's SA80 A1 was regarded as a joke weapon. Is the current SA80 A3 an improvement? Why?


I used both the A1 and A2 as an infantry soldier. I used the A1 in Northern Ireland, and the A2 in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as constant in unit training and exercises for over 20 years. I was a skill at arms instructor and taught the use of both weapons. I am not an armchair general (though ironically I am typing from an armchair).
The A1 was simply a poor weapon. Anyone who tells you otherwise either didn't use it much, were one of the lucky few who had a good example or have never used anything else to compare it to.
It was accurate but spectacularly unreliable. It was not uncommon to have at least one stoppage in each mag, especially when using blanks. Live fire was a bit more reliable but not much. Users became very adept at clearing stoppages quickly. The design of the cocking handle was such that it deflected cases back into the ejection port. The welding on the bolt carrier guide was poor, causing warping over time. The firing pins may as well have been made of glass, and it became SOP to carry a spare in the cleaning kit. The issue RG magazines were thin aluminium which dented easily and had a shallow follower which was prone to tilting which stopped rounds feeding properly. Constant cleaning was needed to get it to fire, however this caused wear in certain areas which created further issues. The gas plug had failure points which could break, particularly in the little recess ring (anyone who has cleaned the gas parts will know the bit I mean), and there were reports of gas plugs having catastrophic failures and blasting out the front of the weapon. They could also be put in the wrong way when cleaning which needed an armourer to drill them out. The list goes on. Troops were deploying with a weapon they had no trust in and which could not be guaranteed to fire when needed. This is a big deal.

HK took a look at the weapon and made changes to virtually every working part. The resultant A2 was a world of difference. The mean rounds between failure (MRBF) was more than double of it's closest competitor in testing. There were a couple of hiccups when deployed with the Marines but this was found to be a problem with the cleaning regimen used. Once rectified the rifle was found to be one of, if not *the*, most reliable rifles in its class. We couldn't believe the difference when we got them. Stoppages were extremely rare and it just worked.



There are some issues inherent to the rifle design which cannot be changed. It is right handed only. The ergonomics of some of the controls leave a lot to be desired. It is also heavy compared to an AR or AK, however, as much of the weight is at the rear, this is not as much of an issue as some would have you believe. With training, the above issues are easily overcome.


The A3 is a further improvement. Some more changes were made to welding, new sight rails were added and a new front hand guard is used. It is also a flat dark earth colour as standard.


In short the SA80A3 is very reliable and very accurate.

Is it the best rifle in the World? That depends on what “best” means to you.

If you like lightweight rifles that fire from both shoulders then probably not.

If you like rifles that go bang when you squeeze the trigger and which allow you to own the infantry quarter mile then it meets the criteria.

I have total trust in the weapon because it has proved itself to me when it counts, and that's good enough for me.




Ray W.

Updated 4h ago
Former Infantry SNCO at British Army


---------------------------- ---------------------------- ends -----------------------------

Okay - I think we're done here....now, back to the records....


I can't tell if you're agreeing with me or disagreeing with me. I've used the first two models and they are as different as chalk and cheese. All of the faults with the first model I agree with. The top panel on the furniture used to pop open, you had to push the cocking handle forward to properly seat the round, the magazines were flimsy as anything etc. The A2, despite what Lance Henriksen says in "Aliens" were never that twitchy and were lovely.

I only mention that one of the highlights of the original SA80 was the SUSAT sight, which at the time was revolutionary and I if I bought an SA80, I would prefer that over the iron sights.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
I can't tell if you're agreeing with me or disagreeing with me. I've used the first two models and they are as different as chalk and cheese. All of the faults with the first model I agree with. The top panel on the furniture used to pop open, you had to push the cocking handle forward to properly seat the round, the magazines were flimsy as anything etc. The A2, despite what Lance Henriksen says in "Aliens" were never that twitchy and were lovely.

I only mention that one of the highlights of the original SA80 was the SUSAT sight, which at the time was revolutionary and I if I bought an SA80, I would prefer that over the iron sights.

the funny is for the Bishop reference. I haven't got a clue about the L85. apart from recalling my cadet instructors on camp being pretty scathing about the straight-pull cadet version and the full fat model.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Saw a headline today saying that there are 39,000 John Does ( unidentified corpse, male) in Mexico since the narco wars commenced.


And Mexico is vying with Brazil for highest COVID-19 deaths in Latin America.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
Saw a headline today saying that there are 39,000 John Does ( unidentified corpse, male) in Mexico since the narco wars commenced.


And Mexico is vying with Brazil for highest COVID-19 deaths in Latin America.

is that the bodies they've actually found, or the estimate of everyone that's gone missing?
 
is that the bodies they've actually found, or the estimate of everyone that's gone missing?

That’s the ones they found. 73k missing currently.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
is that the bodies they've actually found, or the estimate of everyone that's gone missing?

That's the number of corpses in morgues. I think its guesswork on the number of 'Disappeared' - this piece talks about 40,000 : ‘The disappeared’: searching for 40,000 missing victims of Mexico’s drug wars



Local press item from Jan 2020:

El Universal, Mexico City, Mexico, January 07, 2020 07:00

To date, there are 61,637 missing persons in Mexico, of which 5,184 were registered in the last year, among them 1,177 women, the Ministry of the Interior (Segob) reported yesterday.


At least 60,053 cases were between 2006 and 2019, the rest (1,584) occurred in previous years, mainly in Tamaulipas, Jalisco, State of Mexico, Chihuahua, Nuevo León, Sinaloa, Coahuila, Puebla, Guerrero and Veracruz, revealed the head of the National Commission for the Search of Persons, Karla Quintana.

He explained that from the 60s until December 31, 2019, 147,033 people have been reported as missing, of which 58% (85 ,396) have already been located: 94% alive and 6% dead.

"As of today, the official data of the State on people who are still missing is 61,637," he explained.
During the presentation of the report on Clandestine Graves and the National Registry of Missing or Missing Persons, Quintana reported that 74% of the disappeared are men and 25.7% are women. The years with the highest number of cases are 2017 (7 ,595), 2018 (5,976) and 2016 (5,537).

"They are data of the horror behind many stories and narratives of pain from families both in Mexico and among migrants," he said.

He affirmed that of the 61,000 currently missing persons, 15,835 are women, who have been reported in the State of Mexico, Tamaulipas, Puebla, Jalisco and Nuevo León. "Of the women located we have a total of 46,682.

The states with the highest index of location are the State of Mexico, Guanajuato, Yucatán, Puebla, Sinaloa and Tamaulipas," he added.

For his part, the Undersecretary of Human Rights, Population and Migration of the Interior, Alejandro Encinas, specified that at the end of last year there were 9,164 reports of disappearance, of which 5,184 still do not appear, including 1,177 women .

He said that of the 1,124 bodies found in 873 clandestine graves, so far during the government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador, 395 have been identified and 243 were handed over to their families.

Sinaloa, Colima, Veracruz, Sonora and Jalisco are the entities that register the highest number of clandestine graves in the 13 months that the federal administration has been running, Encinas Rodríguez said.

It indicated that from December 1, 2018 to December 31, 2019, search tasks have been carried out in 519 different sites practically in all the states.

"The issue of location of clandestine graves and exhumed bodies is being located, it is fundamentally concentrating on around 16 states that should pay special attention to the policies that we have been promoting," Encinas Rodríguez commented.
 
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