Metalsmith or Parachute Regiment?

Hi all,

I'm 23 and looking to join the army. I've got a prep interview on the 3rd October in Newport and my official interview on the 10th October.

I'm stuck between joining as a metalsmith or joining the parachute regiment. My fitness has been good recently and I managed to get my 1.5 miles down to 9mins 20secs although I would like to get it quicker.

The thought process behind joining as a Metalsmith is that I can gain civilian qualifications that can help me get a trade once I've retired from the army.

But I'm also really attracted to the excitement of joining the Para's and after reading a lot of forum posts it seems to be a really popular regiment to join.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated as I'm 50/50 when it comes to making this decision.
 

ironr4tions

Old-Salt
You could always be an airborne metalsmith. Jumping from planes attached to an anvil...

In all seriousness, do the fun stuff when you're young, you can always retrade later.


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Lol taking it to the next level.

Very true, although how easy or hard is it to transfer once you're in a particular role?
 
@Truxx I can see your point, although it's not the parachute regiment it's self that's putting me off as if I did get in I know I'd be proud to serve within it.

It's just the thought of what I'd do when I come out of the army if I did join the parachute regiment.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
@Truxx I can see your point, although it's not the parachute regiment it's self that's putting me off as if I did get in I know I'd be proud to serve within it.

It's just the thought of what I'd do when I come out of the army if I did join the parachute regiment.
I believe you're thinking too hard about the future. Not that you should neglect it, but you'll find that life in the army will vastly widen your horizons and open up new and tremendous possibilities for you that you never thought possible.

MsG
 
I believe you're thinking too hard about the future. Not that you should neglect it, but you'll find that life in the army will vastly widen your horizons and open up new and tremendous possibilities for you that you never thought possible.

MsG

Very true I do have a habit of doing that. I'll discuss my choices on Friday with the careers advisor and see what he thinks.
My family some who have served in the army and the navy are advising me to go the trade route rather than the para's, but of course they're thinking further ahead than I am I think
 
Go para chap!!!

0r the green option if you are a ruggedly handsome charmer
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
Very true I do have a habit of doing that. I'll discuss my choices on Friday with the careers advisor and see what he thinks.

My family some who have served in the army and the navy are advising me to go the trade route rather than the para's, but of course they're thinking further ahead than I am I think
That’s perfectly understandable from your relatives’ viewpoint. The problem with that is that I suspect you strongly tend to the Para option. If you go the trade route, you’ll invariably find yourself in “foney” mode at some point in the future. You know: “foney I’d done that”, “foney I’d done this”. You might find that it’s not for you – in which case you can re-trade, as already mentioned. You might also find that you discover abilities you never knew you had. An example of that:

I served in the RAMC. During basic training, one of the lads, who’d never even held a rifle before, discovered that he was an absolute crackshot. I mean he could shoot the nuts off a sparrow at 1,000 yards. He decided that he liked that more than medicking and transferred to the infantry. As I say, you never know.

Anyway, the very best of luck to you whatever you decide.

MsG
 
That’s perfectly understandable from your relatives’ viewpoint. The problem with that is that I suspect you strongly tend to the Para option. If you go the trade route, you’ll invariably find yourself in “foney” mode at some point in the future. You know: “foney I’d done that”, “foney I’d done this”. You might find that it’s not for you – in which case you can re-trade, as already mentioned. You might also find that you discover abilities you never knew you had. An example of that:

I served in the RAMC. During basic training, one of the lads, who’d never even held a rifle before, discovered that he was an absolute crackshot. I mean he could shoot the nuts off a sparrow at 1,000 yards. He decided that he liked that more than medicking and transferred to the infantry. As I say, you never know.

Anyway, the very best of luck to you whatever you decide.

MsG

That's really good advice, I know I'd regret not trying for the para's at least. And you're right I am swaying more towards the para's. Metalsmith would be playing it safe which is okay but as you rightly said i'd be stuck in foney mode.

I vaguely remember someone saying to me though that you have to be a certain weight to be in the para's. I'm 5ft 7" and weigh 9 stone. Would I be underweight. 9 stone is my natural bodyweight and I seem to always hover around this point on the scales.
 

sup rec

LE
Book Reviewer
I do like the way everyone keeps saying you can re-trade later - Don't bank on it. It is becoming much harder to do. I have two people that keep coming to my office, both were Cpls and wanted to re-trade from different teeth arms and join Corps (one RLC and one REME). In both cases their cap badges refused the transfer so they decided to get out and then re-join. APC have said no to both and will not allow them to come back into the Army.

The moral here is, do not expected to re-trade, it is not a given. Firstly your unit and then cap badge have to agree to accept the gap you will leave. Then the trade you want to go to has to have vacancies for re-traded personnel and you must meet all the criteria that a new applicant would (educationally wise). The list of vacancies appear on the OVAL and is updated daily, so metalsmith could be on it today but not tomorrow.

As has been mentioned before (but in jest) you could become a metalsmith and then do P Coy and your jumps. you will then also have the chance for AACC if tat flicks you switch.

Just to re-iterate, don't join and then expect to be able to re-trade later - it may not happen.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
sup rec, you seem to be switched on. Can you give your man there some advice with regard to height and weight in the Paras? At one time or another, I've been attached to all three Bns as a Medic, and there were all heights and weights, it seemed to me. But I don't know if there are any firm rules for it.

MsG
 

ACAB

LE
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DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
Cheers, ACAB. Much obliged indeed. I learned a lot meself from that thread.

MsG
 

CC_TA

LE
A REME metalsmith will be posted to a REME Battalion pretty much all the time - not many posts out of there.
If you fancy the metalbending world have a look at Shipwright; not many postings either but plenty of diversity for you to make cash on the side and build up a great CV.
If you really fancy the Paras then 100% commitment to it is probably a minimum.
Have you looked at the Marines at all? A couple of years GD then you can grab a trade. (Still get to do your GD job too.) You can also retrade within the Marines if you fancy a change.
Good luck.
 
Hi all,

I'm 23 and looking to join the army. I've got a prep interview on the 3rd October in Newport and my official interview on the 10th October.

I'm stuck between joining as a metalsmith or joining the parachute regiment. My fitness has been good recently and I managed to get my 1.5 miles down to 9mins 20secs although I would like to get it quicker.

Definitely go para reg. Despite the impression the recruitment brochures try to give, it'll be a complete different experience than REME.

Even if you can't re-trade, you can sign off after your minimum term and rejoin.*

* Cancel that. Apparently untrue. See here: http://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/metalsmith-or-parachute-regiment.219920/page-2#post-6011439
 
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Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Might have been said before, but why not try the Royal Marines. Everyone starts off on general duties doing the fun stuff, then you get the option to specialise in a trade further down the line.

Not sure if they have metalsmiths, but there are plenty of other jobs to choose from.
 
Go Para, and save your pennies.

If you still want to be a tin bender at 46 after you retire, you can surely find training as an apprentice on the outside.

However, I and betting you'll have higher aspirations if you find yourself at the end of a successful airbourne infantry career.
 
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