Met Constable arrested for terrorism offences

Funnily enough in A&S, if your were in one of the ‘county’ divisions (Somerset), things tended to be more formal with Inspectors and above expecting to be saluted, and the standing up you mention, but in the ‘city’ divs (Bristol), it never seemed to happen. This was 1986 onwards.
You could always spot the country boys in the county forces. Red face, hair sticking up with straw in it and chewing a carrot.
 
Are you sure you are not talking about the 1890s? It never happened in the Met when I joined in 1988. In fact half the Met were over the side, led by the Inspectors and Sergeants.
I joined the met in '89, and we defo had the standing up thing. It would happen during parade in the parade room. We'd stand up when the relief insp came in and we'd be wearing our beat helmets. Occasionally the insp would inspect our appointments (truncheon, notebook and whistle [if wearing tunics]). I've seen PCs been sent off duty and told to return for a later shift for 'being in bad order', which was police speak for being in shit state.

Subsequently, PCs were generally well turned out, but more importantly, they were in the right mindset to get out there and do their duty.

It all started falling apart when we became 'a service', and we started to remove the pseudo militaristic rank structure and disciplined mindset.
 
I joined the met in '89, and we defo had the standing up thing. It would happen during parade in the parade room. We'd stand up when the relief insp came in and we'd be wearing our beat helmets. Occasionally the insp would inspect our appointments (truncheon, notebook and whistle [if wearing tunics]). I've seen PCs been sent off duty and told to return for a later shift for 'being in bad order', which was police speak for being in shit state.

Subsequently, PCs were generally well turned out, but more importantly, they were in the right mindset to get out there and do their duty.

It all started falling apart when we became 'a service', and we started to remove the pseudo militaristic rank structure and disciplined mindset.
I don't remember standing up and I only once had to produce my appointments. I have never heard of anyone being sent home. Were you in one of the central London stations. They were funny like that.

I think I only saluted one person and that was a DAC on Aid down town. He looked suprised and then alarmed as I think he had forgotten how to salute. I only did it for fun as I was young in service and still in squaddie mode. I never saw anyone else salute outside of Hendon.
 
Are you sure you are not talking about the 1890s? It never happened in the Met when I joined in 1988. In fact half the Met were over the side, led by the Inspectors and Sergeants.

It happened and was there until I left in 1994. We were always a bit confused when we got a met transferee as they tended to be a law unto themselves. Different forces, different expectations.

GMP was an offshoot of Manchester City police and at that time was under James Anderton. I think he was a bit of a fire breathing preacher so maybe that has something to do with these rules.
 
It happened and was there until I left in 1994. We were always a bit confused when we got a met transferee as they tended to be a law unto themselves. Different forces, different expectations.

GMP was an offshoot of Manchester City police and at that time was under James Anderton. I think he was a bit of a fire breathing preacher so maybe that has something to do with these rules.
We had a few people transfered to the GMP about 2000 to 2008 as they were recruiting. Most of them were Mancs or from around that way. Most of them hated it and a few transfered back to the Met after a couple of years. They said that the culture in the force was toxic, which is something if they were comparing it to the Met. By toxic culture I don't mean the attitude of the ordinary boys and girls.
 
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By toxic culture I don't mean the attitude of the ordinary boys and girls.
That was after my time. However, I can well believe it. Up to the mid nineties, the rank and file such as me were effectively led but we were really looked after by time served Sergeants and Inspectors. When they left, they were replaced by what I would guess were an earlier form of what people now term graduate entrants. They seemed more concerned with their own careers.

I could not function in that job now and would most likely be sacked quickly.
 

NSP

LE
Funnily enough in A&S, if your were in one of the ‘county’ divisions (Somerset), things tended to be more formal with Inspectors and above expecting to be saluted, and the standing up you mention, but in the ‘city’ divs (Bristol), it never seemed to happen. This was 1986 onwards.
There's an A&S plod living adjacent to me. A bit of light joshing/provoking indicates he couldn't throw up a credible salute either palm front or palm down (stand fast the RN). I mean, I could do better and I last "threw one up" in 1988 on my last ATC night.
 
I would guess that it would fall under Article 9


But because he was a member of a party was one who's very ethos ran against the provisions of both the RRC and Article 9 he hadn't a leg to stand on.
Up until the EU gave me the freedom of thought, I would have voted Remain


Article 9 – Freedom of thought, conscience and religion

1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought,
 
You are correct. You could not be a member of any party. Being such a member could result in dismissal. Attending a political meeting was frowned upon. A friend of mine was expressly ordered not to attend Labour party meetings. I suspect it would have been the same for any other party. It was the idea of political activity not the type of activity.

Please note I use the word : "was." At that time, up to the mid nineties, you were not allowed to live with a woman unless married. You had to ask permission to be married and your partners history was examined very carefully.

I have a sneaking suspicion things have changed.*

*You were also required to answer your front door in at least shirt sleeve order, maintain you garden to an approved standard and be on duty all the time. This latter caused a lot of problems for people in tied housing because the locals often turned up expecting service which you must provide ( failure to do so causing a raft of offences starting with neglect of duty).

I will say it again, I think things have changed. It would be good if a serving Constable could elaborate on this. Particularly the marriage thing and political activity.
They sold all of the houses?
 
It doesn't say much for the vetting procedure if he managed to get in under the radar.

This from Amber Rudd in 2016:

'... a racist, antisemitic and homophobic organisation which stirs up hatred, glorifies violence and promotes a vile ideology.'

Could apply to many parties, BLM and the Labour Party tick those boxes to a greater or lesser degree.

This is interesting:

' As well as charges of belonging to or professing to belong to National Action between 17 December 2016 and 1 January 2018, contrary to the Terrorism Act 2000, he has also been charged with fraud offences along with possessing an indecent photograph of a child.'

'Are you now or have you ever been a member of the communist party?'

Also an indecent photo of a child? I don't doubt the charge but usually when paedophiles are arrested their photo collections seem to number in the tens to hundreds of thousands.
If only it was a hot day. He couldn't have worn a big jacket, jump the barrier at the tube and then run when challenged...
 
Wasn't he the one who reckoned he had a direct hotline to god? As you say a bit of a bible basher. I remember him being in the news because of that.
Yes. He spoke to God regularly and his God was vengeful and just and almost certainly a member of the Rotary Club.

I actually respected him and thought he was the right man in the right position at the right time. As I have got old , I must say though that I do not even recognise the person I was then. Maybe Mr Anderton was not quite the person I thought him to be.
 
Thankfully, I was rarely asked to show my appointments.

At that time, every time you used your truncheon , you had to submit a report. My staff as they insisted on calling it was a bit of a mess from unreported though legitimate incidents so I would have been on the naughty step. On the few occasions when required to show appts., I used someone else's and a blind eye was turned.
 
I don't remember standing up and I only once had to produce my appointments. I have never heard of anyone being sent home. Were you in one of the central London stations. They were funny like that.

I think I only saluted one person and that was a DAC on Aid down town. He looked suprised and then alarmed as I think he had forgotten how to salute. I only did it for fun as I was young in service and still in squaddie mode. I never saw anyone else salute outside of Hendon.
I was a prob at XS then went firearms at ID.

The PC who got sent home came out of TS shorty before me. He was genuinely gungy. The collar of his shirts were minging as was his uniform that seemed to have all sorts of foodstuffs and other unmentionables down it. His admin was shocking and an embarrassment. Completely unnecessary because in those days, we still got cleaning vouchers, so it didn't even cost to get your kit done.

I used to salute my insp, but he'd been RAF Regt Offr, so he loved it. It did tend to worry the other PCs though. Quite funny at the time.
 
There's an A&S plod living adjacent to me. A bit of light joshing/provoking indicates he couldn't throw up a credible salute either palm front or palm down (stand fast the RN). I mean, I could do better and I last "threw one up" in 1988 on my last ATC night.
When I joined them in the late 80s, A&S did their initial training at the Regional Training Centre at Chantmarle in Dorset. It was very militaristic, very rigid and featured quite a lot of drill. I believe it’s closed now, and I’m sure the training is nothing like that.
 

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