MERS Coronavirus warning

Good to see that as responsible global citizens, the Chinese are so concerned as to throw shade on other countries for their lack of biosecurity! 'Hypocrisy' mustn't translate into Cantonese.

'China has warned Japan not to repeat “mistakes” it made in the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak, adding to do so would create “the next Wuhan”.

'Japan currently has the highest number of infections outside China and on Monday took steps to keep the outbreak in check. It banned 38,000 runners from taking part in the Tokyo Marathon, limiting participants in the March 1 race to only elite runners. It cancelled the Emperor’s birthday celebrations next week, meaning the tens of thousands of people who would have descended on the Imperial Palace in Tokyo will no longer do so. It shut down new admissions to a hospital near Tokyo after a nurse tested positive for the deadly virus after treating a patient who later died. And it issued new guidelines for residents who have any symptoms whatsoever, warning them not to leave the house and instead call a special consultation centre set up by the government.

'Despite those measures, China says Japan is being too casual about the virus and is in danger of repeating mistakes made in Wuhan when the virus began taking hold. The Global Times, a tabloid newspaper overseen by the Chinese Government, wrote on Monday that “Chinese netizens” are worried about “a neighbouring country with such a lack of epidemic control and quarantine awareness”. The concerns, according to the Times, stemmed from video footage showing hundreds of Japanese people together for the annual Naked Festival in Okayama prefecture in the southern part of Japan’s Honshu island.*

“Netizens also expressed waves of similar concerns after learning about the schedules of a number of public events in Japan with potential huge crowds present remaining unchanged despite the epidemic situation, and they said such a low degree of caution the Japanese government takes on the virus sees Japan emerge on the same path to become the next Wuhan, the COVID-19 outbreak centre, where strict and effective quarantine and viral control measures were not timely implemented at first,” the Times editors wrote.'



* And before anyone gets too excited - The event, called "Hadaka Matsuri" in Japanese, is a wild and raucous festival held every year on the third Saturday of February at the Saidaiji Kannonin Temple, about a 30-minute train ride from Okayama city. But the 10,000 or so male participants aren't as naked as the festival's name suggests. They sport a minimal amount of clothing; usually a Japanese loincloth called a "fundoshi" and a pair of white socks called "tabi."
 
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More on the wider economic effects of globalised manufacturing.

'The rapidly spreading coronavirus in China is expected to hit South Korea second hardest if the virus epidemic forces Beijing to disrupt its supply of intermediary goods to Seoul, a report showed Tuesday.

'According to the report by the Korea Institute for International Economic Policy (KIEP), China's exports of intermediary goods to South Korea stood at US$75.1 billion in 2017, accounting for a 6.5 percent of Beijing's total exports of intermediary goods. The United States was the largest importer of China's intermediary goods in 2017, with the ratio standing at 10.7 percent, the report showed. That was followed by Japan with 5.5 percent, Germany with 2.7 percent and Taiwan with 2.7 percent. "If the supply of Chinese-made intermediary goods is disrupted, it will have a negative impact on Korean firms doing business in China," the report said. "Also, it could have a negative impact on Korean exporters as China's economy slows."


 
Good to see that as responsible global citizens, the Chinese are so concerned as to throw shade on other countries for their lack of biosecurity! 'Hypocrisy' mustn't translate into Cantonese.
A) The GT article basically says "Don't **** up as badly as we did." Hardly throwing shade, more concern that lessons aren't being learned.

B) Cantonese is a minority language in China. I can think of at least 4 Mandarin translations for hypocrisy, most of revolve around lacking 'correct' manners.
 
Good to see that as responsible global citizens, the Chinese are so concerned as to throw shade on other countries for their lack of biosecurity! 'Hypocrisy' mustn't translate into Cantonese.

'China has warned Japan not to repeat “mistakes” it made in the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak, adding to do so would create “the next Wuhan”.

'Japan currently has the highest number of infections outside China and on Monday took steps to keep the outbreak in check. It banned 38,000 runners from taking part in the Tokyo Marathon, limiting participants in the March 1 race to only elite runners. It cancelled the Emperor’s birthday celebrations next week, meaning the tens of thousands of people who would have descended on the Imperial Palace in Tokyo will no longer do so. It shut down new admissions to a hospital near Tokyo after a nurse tested positive for the deadly virus after treating a patient who later died. And it issued new guidelines for residents who have any symptoms whatsoever, warning them not to leave the house and instead call a special consultation centre set up by the government.

'Despite those measures, China says Japan is being too casual about the virus and is in danger of repeating mistakes made in Wuhan when the virus began taking hold. The Global Times, a tabloid newspaper overseen by the Chinese Government, wrote on Monday that “Chinese netizens” are worried about “a neighbouring country with such a lack of epidemic control and quarantine awareness”. The concerns, according to the Times, stemmed from video footage showing hundreds of Japanese people together for the annual Naked Festival in Okayama prefecture in the southern part of Japan’s Honshu island.*

“Netizens also expressed waves of similar concerns after learning about the schedules of a number of public events in Japan with potential huge crowds present remaining unchanged despite the epidemic situation, and they said such a low degree of caution the Japanese government takes on the virus sees Japan emerge on the same path to become the next Wuhan, the COVID-19 outbreak centre, where strict and effective quarantine and viral control measures were not timely implemented at first,” the Times editors wrote.'



* And before anyone gets too excited - The event, called "Hadaka Matsuri" in Japanese, is a wild and raucous festival held every year on the third Saturday of February at the Saidaiji Kannonin Temple, about a 30-minute train ride from Okayama city. But the 10,000 or so male participants aren't as naked as the festival's name suggests. They sport a minimal amount of clothing; usually a Japanese loincloth called a "fundoshi" and a pair of white socks called "tabi."
Talking about 'mistakes', as you were, it seems Cambodia has stuffed up when it reckoned that pax departing the cruise ship Westerdam may not have been screened very well:

"SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia: When Cambodia’s prime minister greeted passengers on a cruise ship amid a coronavirus scare on Valentine’s Day, embraces were the order of the day. Protective masks were not.

Not only did Prime Minister Hun Sen not wear one, assured that the ship was virus-free, his bodyguards ordered people who had donned masks to take them off. The next day, the US ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy, who brought his own family to greet the passengers streaming off the ship, also went maskless.

But after hundreds of passengers had disembarked, one later tested positive for the coronavirus. Now, health officials worry that what Cambodia opened its doors to was the outbreak, and that the world may pay a price as passengers from the cruse ship Westerdam stream home."

Full story here:

 
Talking about 'mistakes', as you were, it seems Cambodia has stuffed up when it reckoned that pax departing the cruise ship Westerdam may not have been screened very well:

"SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia: When Cambodia’s prime minister greeted passengers on a cruise ship amid a coronavirus scare on Valentine’s Day, embraces were the order of the day. Protective masks were not.

Not only did Prime Minister Hun Sen not wear one, assured that the ship was virus-free, his bodyguards ordered people who had donned masks to take them off. The next day, the US ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy, who brought his own family to greet the passengers streaming off the ship, also went maskless.

But after hundreds of passengers had disembarked, one later tested positive for the coronavirus. Now, health officials worry that what Cambodia opened its doors to was the outbreak, and that the world may pay a price as passengers from the cruse ship Westerdam stream home."

Full story here:

Yes, it certainly looks like those countries that had treated it as a 'plague ship' and refused docking rights were on the money.
 

Flight

LE
Book Reviewer
Cambodia’s prime minister greeted passengers
Think we need to organise a meet and greet between our MPs and the Cambodian Prime Minister ASAP.
 

4(T)

LE
"
Like many other American staples and luxuries, L.O.L. Surprise! dolls are made in China. Chatsworth-based MGA Entertainment has them manufactured in Guangdong province, trucked to the port in Yantian Harbor, loaded on ships and brought to the United States, where the popular toys are distributed to retailers and scooped up by eager children. The process went smoothly for years.

Then the coronavirus outbreak hit, and the supply chain stuttered.

The situation is “a disaster, frankly,” MGA Chief Executive Isaac Larian said. Production of his company’s toys has dropped 60% compared with this period last year. To get by, he said, he is filling only partial toy orders — “if a retailer wants 100,000 pieces, we’re giving them 15,000 or 20,000.”

Businesses of all stripes in California and nationwide are feeling pain from the coronavirus outbreak, which has killed 1,775 people and infected more than 71,300 others worldwide, mostly in China.


Activity at Chinese factories has slowed or stopped. Fewer cargo ships from China are docking at Southern California ports. Chinese visitors’ spending in Los Angeles could plunge nearly $1 billion this year.

U.S. shoppers might start seeing items missing from store shelves as early as mid-April, analyst Edward J. Kelly of Wells Fargo Securities said in a note to clients last week. Big-box retailers such as Walmart and Target “could be the first to experience out-of-stock issues” because they restock more quickly, he wrote.

Should the epidemic be quickly contained, the overall effect on California’s economy will be short-term with minimal job losses, said Lynn Reaser, chief economist of the Fermanian Business & Economic Institute at Point Loma Nazarene University.

“Most of the damage will be toward the bottom lines of these companies,” Reaser said. “There’s therefore no need to implement long-term layoffs of the types of employees involved in California.”



Still, she said California’s technology firms may probably see a drop in sales and profits, especially those dependent on parts coming from China and those reliant on the sale of goods and services to China.

Larian, however, fears the virus could “cause a major downturn on the whole consumer-goods business — electronics, shoes, apparel.”

The timing of the outbreak was key because workers at Chinese plants had returned to their hometowns for two weeks to celebrate the Lunar New Year on Jan. 25, and “now they’re stuck, they cannot come back to the factories” because of quarantines, Larian said.

“Some of the factories that did open can’t get raw materials, like fabric and plastics, to make the products. And if they can make products, they can’t get them on the road to the ships because the quarantines mean you can’t travel from one area to another,” he said.

Rival toymaker Mattel Inc. in El Segundo also cited that problem Friday in announcing that its Chinese factories and those of its contract partners, which were supposed to restart production Feb. 3, would stay shut until Monday.

“We do expect production delays,” Mattel Chief Financial Officer Joseph Euteneuer said on a call with analysts. “While none of our manufacturing is located in the Wuhan province” where the coronavirus outbreak started, “the ability of the manufacturing workforce to return to work after the Lunar New Year holiday is being impacted.”

One of those workers is Li Jianchao, who works in a factory that makes stuffed animals and dolls in the southern Chinese city of Dongguan but traveled to the Jiangxi province in central China, 500 miles away, for the holiday. For the last few weeks, he’s had no luck contacting his boss about returning to work.

“At first, he said he would get back to us when he knew he could resume the operation,” Li said. “Then he stopped taking anyone’s phone calls.”


It’s a problem felt across industries. Apple Inc.'s manufacturing partners, such as Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., also known as Foxconn, imposed quarantines on workers returning from the holiday this month, causing a halt in device assembly operations.

“We see that the number [of virus cases] don’t seem to be ebbing,” said Gerrit Schneemann, senior smartphone analyst at the research firm IHS Markit. “It feels like this will continue on at least for a couple more weeks.”

The delays “will be a shock to the system and disrupt the supply chain further for Apple on both its core iPhone franchise and AirPods unit production, which is already facing a short supply,” analyst Dan Ives of Wedbush Securities said in a recent note.

Apple confirmed those concerns Monday when it warned investors it would miss its revenue guidance for the first quarter. The company blamed the shortfall on a shortage of iPhones caused by production bottlenecks in China and on lower demand within the country.

China makes 80% of the world’s smartphones and tablets and it exports 55% of the world’s handsets and computers, according to research from the Swiss bank UBS.

Earlier this month Facebook Inc. stopped taking new orders for its back-ordered Oculus Quest virtual reality headset due to delays in hardware production from the viral outbreak.

Amazon.com urged Chinese third-party sellers on its Marketplace section to alert buyers of the likely disruption of orders and to consider setting their status to vacation mode to avoid incurring poor customer ratings, according to messages to sellers viewed by The Times.

Qualcomm Inc., the San Diego-based chip manufacturing giant, warned shareholders on an earnings call that the virus had introduced “significant uncertainty” into the company’s overseas supply chain, with Chief Executive Steve Mollenkopf calling the outbreak an “unprecedented situation.”


Chui Yin Chau, a virtual and augmented reality industry analyst with Greenlight Insights, said there was no clear end in sight to the turmoil.

“When we talk to manufacturers, they cannot give an estimate” of when they might be able to return to full production capacity, Chau said. “Most of them are starting to resume production this week, but it still depends on many, many external factors, so they cannot guarantee anything.”

The effect on supply chains extends to the Port of Los Angeles — along with the dockworkers, truck drivers and the vast warehouse and distribution network that rely on it — all of which already had been disrupted in recent months by the U.S.-China trade war, said Gene Seroka, the port’s executive director.

He estimated that overall, there would be 80 fewer sailings of ships from China to the United States, and 350,000 fewer shipping containers received, in the coming weeks. The number of cargo containers received at the twin ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach would drop by one-fifth.

The virus also means fewer Chinese people are visiting Southern California. Tourism Economics, a division of Oxford Economics, forecasts a loss of up to 325,000 Chinese visitors to Los Angeles this year owing to the outbreak, resulting in a drop of $921 million in direct spending. But overall visitor spending in L.A. is still expected to rise.

More than 100,000 people were scheduled to converge on Barcelona, Spain, next week for the world’s largest phone show, Mobile World Congress, but that event was canceled Wednesday due to the virus.

David Schwartz, a gaming historian and history professor at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, said the effect of the coronavirus outbreak on Las Vegas is still unclear and that a better read will come in March when detailed data on gambling spending for January and February will be released. He said spending on Baccarat, a card game favored by Chinese gamblers, will be telling.

“The question is if it spreads, does it lead to a shift in travel behavior,” he said. “If it is contained and goes away pretty quickly, it’s not going to be a big impact.”

Some of Las Vegas’ biggest casino owners, such as Wynn Resorts, Las Vegas Sands and MGM Resorts International, may suffer the biggest blows because they also own resorts in Macau, an autonomous region of China where casinos have been shuttered.

Americans, meanwhile, are cutting back on travel for fear of infection. Travel Leaders Network, a group of 5,700 travel agencies in North America, said it surveyed nearly 400 travel advisors and found that about one-third reported a high to moderate number of cancellations to China and other parts of Asia.

Anoosheh Oskouian, chief executive of Ship & Shore, a Signal Hill provider of pollution-abatement equipment, said she won’t travel to China to check on operations at a manufacturing facility for fear of getting the virus.

The firm became a co-owner of a plant in China late last year to offset the costs of higher tariffs on products it imports.

“This is the first time we are manufacturing everything there and I’m not able to go back,” Oskouian said. “I’m supposed to be in China right now. We’re almost completely out of touch with the people we should be in regular contact with. It’s one of those problems where it’s hard to develop a solution.”

A broad swath of U.S. firms that sell goods and services in China also are losing sales due to the virus.

McDonald’s Corp., Nike Inc. and Starbucks Corp. already have closed scores of stores in China. The apparel firm Under Armour Inc. said the outbreak would cause its sales to drop by $50 million to $60 million.

Skechers USA Inc., the Manhattan Beach-based footwear maker, also reported “a significant number of temporary store closures” and said its comparable store sales in China — or those of stores open at least a year — were “below average.”

Walt Disney Co. has temporarily shut down its theme parks in Shanghai and Hong Kong, which is expected to cut $175 million from its second-quarter operating income.

The coronavirus also has effectively shut down mainland China’s booming cinema industry, with almost all theaters in the country closed, and Chinese and U.S. studios have felt the effects of the pause.

During the Spring Festival holiday, which ran Jan. 24 through Feb. 12, box-office sales totaled about $3.94 million, down nearly 100% from $1.5 billion the same holiday period a year ago, according to Artisan Gateway, a consultancy that follows the Chinese film industry.

For studios outside China, including Hollywood companies that often rely on the country’s massive population to pad results for their movies, the market has virtually vanished temporarily due to the outbreak. Imported films have grossed a mere $37.8 million at Chinese theaters so far this year, down 86% from the same period in 2019, according to Artisan Gateway data.

Tesla Inc., meanwhile, shut down its new Shanghai assembly plant from Feb. 2 to Feb. 10, but it’s unclear how much production has resumed. The Fremont automaker was aiming to build 150,000 electric cars at the facility this year.

“It is unknown whether and how global supply chains, particularly for automotive parts, may be affected if such an epidemic persists for an extended period of time,” Tesla said in its newly issued 2019 annual report.

Overall, the virus will disrupt production of at least 1 million vehicles across the industry, the China Assn. of Automobile Manufacturers said.

Even if the outbreak stabilized today, “it’s probably three weeks before you get real visibility” on its effect on the carmakers “and everyone has their own plans to either throttle down or ramp up capacity,” said Dan Hearsch, a managing director at the consulting firm AlixPartners.

Earlier this month, European commercial aircraft maker Airbus temporarily closed a final assembly line for its A-320 aircraft in Tianjin, China, but the company said Thursday it had been authorized by Chinese authorities to reopen the line. Airbus did not specify when it would restart or how the closure affected its business.

“Airbus is constantly evaluating the situation and monitoring any potential secondary effects to production and deliveries and will try to mitigate via alternative plans where necessary,” Airbus said.

Due to tight government regulations, the U.S. aerospace industry does not typically import components from China, though materials from China can be made into parts elsewhere in the world and eventually used in U.S. planes and other vehicles."

From LA times.



So in reality a bit of an economic-environmental win-win situation. People have to stop buying new bling for the sake of it and make older but perfectly serviceable goods last longer, and western nations slow down on the rate at which they are enriching and empowering a potentially dangerous totalitarian state at the cost of their own economic health.
 
...
'Japan currently has the highest number of infections outside China and on Monday took steps to keep the outbreak in check.
...
Actually, Japan has 66 of it's own cases, less than the 77 currently reported in Singapore.

The quarantined Diamond Princess, which Japan kept (mostly) from disembarking is in second place. Exceeding the number of cases in the next 4 countries (HK being China) by more than double their combined total cases.

Screenshot (1270).png
 

Flight

LE
Book Reviewer

40% of VWs, 30% of BMWs and 30% of Mercs sold in China... 4 million VWs alone sold there. Factories running at 20% capacity And none of them have assembly plants in the Hubei area.

As I say, if this goes on for long weeks or months then there will be some very serious economic impacts.

I'd assume the factories in Germany and elsewhere around the world have yet to run out of components, though this appears inevitable.
 
Actually, Japan has 66 of it's own cases, less than the 77 currently reported in Singapore.

The quarantined Diamond Princess, which Japan kept (mostly) from disembarking is in second place. Exceeding the number of cases in the next 4 countries (HK being China) by more than double their combined total cases.

View attachment 450664
Not like the Chinese to get their facts wrong. :p
 
Not like the Chinese to get their facts wrong. :p
To be "fair" if you count the Diamond Princess as Japan due to the fact it's harboring in Japanese waters, then that does promote Japan to number 2, and increase their number of "confirmed cases" to 0.72% of China's tally.
 

40% of VWs, 30% of BMWs and 30% of Mercs sold in China... 4 million VWs alone sold there. Factories running at 20% capacity And none of them have assembly plants in the Hubei area.

As I say, if this goes on for long weeks or months then there will be some very serious economic impacts.

I'd assume the factories in Germany and elsewhere around the world have yet to run out of components, though this appears inevitable.
I don't think it can go on much longer, there's too much money at risk. Plus the Chinese government won't want to appear helpless, so it must be under pressure to send everyone back to work rather than have another month of "wait and see". People trapped in places away from home for the past few weeks will be desperate to get back, worrying about burglars and fires.

If mass quarantine happens in the UK, would we take the chance to round up people wanted by the police while they were all stuck in their houses?

For info:
from quarantine | Origin and meaning of quarantine by Online Etymology Dictionary -
https://www.etymonline.com/

quarantine (n.)
1660s, "period a ship suspected of carrying disease is kept in isolation," from Italian quarantina giorni, literally "space of forty days," from quaranta "forty," from Latin quadraginta"forty," which is related to quattuor "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four"). So called from the Venetian policy (first enforced in 1377) of keeping ships from plague-stricken countries waiting off its port for 40 days to assure that no latent cases were aboard. Also see lazaretto. The extended sense of "any period of forced isolation" is from 1670s.
Earlier in English the word meant "period of 40 days in which a widow has the right to remain in her dead husband's house" (1520s), and, as quarentyne (15c.), "desert in which Christ fasted for 40 days," from Latin quadraginta "forty."
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Couple of highlights from the EIU seminar reported above [https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/mers-coronavirus-warning.214505/post-9829259 ] on economic impacts:

1) China has three hundred MILLION migrant workers - only 50% have so far returned to work from Chinese New Year.

upthere said:
For instance Chinese car production dropped by 20% in January... Even though the quarantine only began in the last week of that month
.

2) USA and Germany get 85% of their antibiotics from.....China.
 
So in reality a bit of an economic-environmental win-win situation. People have to stop buying new bling for the sake of it and make older but perfectly serviceable goods last longer, and western nations slow down on the rate at which they are enriching and empowering a potentially dangerous totalitarian state at the cost of their own economic health.
Because globalisation was dragged out of the west despite their furious objections...

Nothing's fundamentally changed about human behaviour and motivations. That means not much has changed in principle in the Combat Appreciation of mercantilism.
 
So in reality a bit of an economic-environmental win-win situation. People have to stop buying new bling for the sake of it and make older but perfectly serviceable goods last longer, and western nations slow down on the rate at which they are enriching and empowering a potentially dangerous totalitarian state at the cost of their own economic health.
There is some truth in that.

The big problem is that China plays the long game. The very long game.

They are not bothered by decent salaries, high cost of living, workers rights etc. They built a very successful economy by theft, repression, careful experimentation and trial rather than by economic dogma.

They know that if they can take a manufacturing industry from the west then the west will lose that capacity fairly quickly.

Europeans/Americans cannot make a portable DVD player, export it across the globe and sell it for £11.99 (price checked online just now). Not only can China do this we don’t even have the capability to do it. We can build it, but not in a hurry.

Once China has cornered various markets with cheap tat it can then follow the Japanese model and convert the tat production to high quality production. In the sixties Japanese cars were called “Jap crap”. In the late seventies they were better quality than anything the U.K. churned out. (And yes, Japan hit a road bump but that was of their own making. Too many old people, not enough young people and zero immigration. China actually seems to be following this trend).

We’re doomed I tell you.
 

4(T)

LE
There is some truth in that.

The big problem is that China plays the long game. The very long game.

They are not bothered by decent salaries, high cost of living, workers rights etc. They built a very successful economy by theft, repression, careful experimentation and trial rather than by economic dogma.

They know that if they can take a manufacturing industry from the west then the west will lose that capacity fairly quickly.

Europeans/Americans cannot make a portable DVD player, export it across the globe and sell it for £11.99 (price checked online just now). Not only can China do this we don’t even have the capability to do it. We can build it, but not in a hurry.

Once China has cornered various markets with cheap tat it can then follow the Japanese model and convert the tat production to high quality production. In the sixties Japanese cars were called “Jap crap”. In the late seventies they were better quality than anything the U.K. churned out. (And yes, Japan hit a road bump but that was of their own making. Too many old people, not enough young people and zero immigration. China actually seems to be following this trend).

We’re doomed I tell you.


I agree.

We - or rather the nice Americans - are going to have to face China in a war somewhere, sometime. It'll be very nasty, and may well end up in Chinese hegemony of the globe. It will certainly mean the end of the anglo-saxon world order and the rule of international law.

We certainly shouldn't be hastening the process by which China empowers itself. The US have seen the light, and its about time our other western governments started to take the long view.
 
I agree.

We - or rather the nice Americans - are going to have to face China in a war somewhere, sometime. It'll be very nasty, and may well end up in Chinese hegemony of the globe. It will certainly mean the end of the anglo-saxon world order and the rule of international law.

We certainly shouldn't be hastening the process by which China empowers itself. The US have seen the light, and its about time our other western governments started to take the long view.
Unless the MERSCorona Virus is extremely bad, and I doubt it will be, we have probably already lost that war.
The end result of that will be interesting as the Communists have a proven ability to develop ideas but no history of inventing things as it is against their ideology.
I will be dead by then.
 

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