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MERS Coronavirus warning

The people didn't shut down cancer services
Neither did the Government - I think you’ll find that decision (if true) was taken at the highest level of the NHS.
 
Neither did the Government - I think you’ll find that decision (if true) was taken at the highest level of the NHS.
In early March, each NHS Trust, in consultation with the local area hierarchy, was instructed to produce a plan as to how their Trust was going to cope with the expected surge in demand due to Covid-19 admissions.

Most, like ours, cancelled all non-urgent services and surgery. We converted 75% of our operating theatres to Covid wards. Rehab clinics and training rooms were converted to non-covid wards, Staff leave cancelled, staff working 12hr shifts. Beds emptied where possible (yes, that's where the Care Home crisis came from) and staff redeployed to meet the demand - if you're experiencing a 500% increase in ICU patients, then you'll need a corresponding increase in skilled staff to work in those areas (mush_sister-in-law is an oncology nurse practitioner, she was deployed to ICU for 8 weeks)

The modelling in March predicted a peak in Covid admissions around the weekend of 13th April, and the actual admissions did peak that weekend. The predicted numbers weren't far off either. But it takes a significant time for those admitted to recover to the point of discharge, or be discharged by the via the mortuary.

By late June we were planning to reopen services - although some have been reconfigured. E.g GP referrals are now triaged before being admitted onto the outpatients list whereas before they would so straight onto the list, also a significant proportion of first consultations are now done by video conference - actually quite liked by the patients.

So yes, cancer services have restarted but they were suspended for a good reason. With the best will in the world any organisation that is operating at high capacity to start with and has a high cost and lead time for expansion, has to make difficult decisions if a tidal wave is on the horizon.

The Government didn't close down cancer services, neither did NHS England. Each Trust had it's own plan. Some reduced fewer services as the predicted Covid numbers in their area allowed them to. Others shut down far more for the same reason.
 
In early March, each NHS Trust, in consultation with the local area hierarchy, was instructed to produce a plan as to how their Trust was going to cope with the expected surge in demand due to Covid-19 admissions.

Most, like ours, cancelled all non-urgent services and surgery. We converted 75% of our operating theatres to Covid wards. Rehab clinics and training rooms were converted to non-covid wards, Staff leave cancelled, staff working 12hr shifts. Beds emptied where possible (yes, that's where the Care Home crisis came from) and staff redeployed to meet the demand - if you're experiencing a 500% increase in ICU patients, then you'll need a corresponding increase in skilled staff to work in those areas (mush_sister-in-law is an oncology nurse practitioner, she was deployed to ICU for 8 weeks)

The modelling in March predicted a peak in Covid admissions around the weekend of 13th April, and the actual admissions did peak that weekend. The predicted numbers weren't far off either. But it takes a significant time for those admitted to recover to the point of discharge, or be discharged by the via the mortuary.

By late June we were planning to reopen services - although some have been reconfigured. E.g GP referrals are now triaged before being admitted onto the outpatients list whereas before they would so straight onto the list, also a significant proportion of first consultations are now done by video conference - actually quite liked by the patients.

So yes, cancer services have restarted but they were suspended for a good reason. With the best will in the world any organisation that is operating at high capacity to start with and has a high cost and lead time for expansion, has to make difficult decisions if a tidal wave is on the horizon.

The Government didn't close down cancer services, neither did NHS England. Each Trust had it's own plan. Some reduced fewer services as the predicted Covid numbers in their area allowed them to. Others shut down far more for the same reason.
Very informative - thank you.
 

Chalkythedog

Old-Salt
It's high time Boris put us out of our misery. Come on man get the national lockdown in place and there's an end to it. There won't be much crawling out of the smoking ruins this time.
 
It's high time Boris put us out of our misery. Come on man get the national lockdown in place and there's an end to it. There won't be much crawling out of the smoking ruins this time.
I actually enjoyed the big lockdown, less people kicking about, cleaner air, and wads of scumbags locked up. Bring it.
 
I actually enjoyed the big lockdown, less people kicking about, cleaner air, and wads of scumbags locked up. Bring it.
0A and I are currently in quarantine at the moment having just got back from France, and loving it!!

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 
One MILLION deaths from Covid19 world wide. The world population of 7.5 billion loses a million people every 10 days approximately. That's about 23 million since Covid19 started. Statistically Covid19 at its novel worst is just another cause of death and humanity will, over a period, roll with the punch.

It’s still one MILLION grandmothers, grandfathers, uncles, aunts, mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, friends, colleagues. One million deaths of loved ones.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
It’s still one MILLION grandmothers, grandfathers, uncles, aunts, mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, friends, colleagues. One million deaths of loved ones.
Would it make any difference if they died from cancer? What about heart disease or dementia? What if those were the deaths in newborns or caused by diabetes?

Here's the data from 2017:
annual-number-of-deaths-by-cause.png

In 2017 road accidents killed more than COVID-19 has managed so far. Chances are that COVID won't kill more people in 2020 than diarrhoea and related diseases managed in 2017. That should be inspiring some real outrage.

They've taken their data from the Lancet's annual estimate of global deaths - https://www.thelancet.com/gbd
 
Has this stupid Sweaty tart had a mention yet?

 
Has this stupid Sweaty tart had a mention yet?

She was just about to before you posted that.


If we ever needed convincing any further that no matter what the majority of sensible people do to follow the guidelines, there will always be some fuckwits who will balls it up fir all the rest.

She is a fcuking retard, and I don't know how anyone could be so stupid with only one head. FFS
 

crow_bag

Old-Salt
please share Your crystal ball with us and tell us the impact on the NHS of say, five hundred thousand each of extra patients with severe lung and heart problems in say 10 years?
Up to 16:01 today there had been 460,178 positive tests in the UK.

Of those how many are expected to suffer long term side effects?

How about we wait u til there is some scientific evidence before we start running around like chicken licken screaming that the sky is falling in?

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 
Would it make any difference if they died from cancer? What about heart disease or dementia? What if those were the deaths in newborns or caused by diabetes?

Here's the data from 2017:
View attachment 508889
In 2017 road accidents killed more than COVID-19 has managed so far. Chances are that COVID won't kill more people in 2020 than diarrhoea and related diseases managed in 2017. That should be inspiring some real outrage.

They've taken their data from the Lancet's annual estimate of global deaths - https://www.thelancet.com/gbd
Road injuries are number 11 on your list of causes of death world wide. How can you justify the immense cost and loss of liberty involved in driving restrictions?

Shouldn't you be advocating for the following?
  • Remove the requirement for a driver's license or test.
  • Remove any minimum age limits on driving.
  • Repeal the laws limiting people from driving while drunk.
  • Rip down all the guard rails on highways.
  • Repeal all the regulations requiring seat belts or air bags.
  • Remove any requirement for car makers to have their cars approved as safe before they are allowed to be sold.
  • Drop requirements for having to register your car and display license plates.
  • Drop requirements for mandatory insurance.
  • Etc.
How can you justify having these things if road injuries are only number 11 on your list?
 
Road injuries are number 11 on your list of causes of death world wide. How can you justify the immense cost and loss of liberty involved in driving restrictions?

Shouldn't you be advocating for the following?
  • Remove the requirement for a driver's license or test.
  • Remove any minimum age limits on driving.
  • Repeal the laws limiting people from driving while drunk.
  • Rip down all the guard rails on highways.
  • Repeal all the regulations requiring seat belts or air bags.
  • Remove any requirement for car makers to have their cars approved as safe before they are allowed to be sold.
  • Drop requirements for having to register your car and display license plates.
  • Drop requirements for mandatory insurance.
  • Etc.
How can you justify having these things if road injuries are only number 11 on your list?

You're making a strawman argument. No-one's saying - as far as I'm aware - that we shouldn't take sensible precautions to limit the spread of this corona'.

Just like no-one's saying we ought to ban driving outright because it's a massive killer.

We impose sensible rules for driving and we ACCEPT the deaths that come from it.

A bit like what we should've done with the coronavirus.
 

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