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MERS Coronavirus warning

So I switched to Dr John who points out that this 'deadly disease' is so far the worlds 14th biggest killer, yet the world is throwing billions of $$$ at it:

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You'll also notice that most (if not all) the much more dangerous diseases are preventable too.
 

Winnet

War Hero
I've just been listening to a French epidemiologist; he reckons the figures France produces aren't right (PCR tests) and the increase are areas which weren't hit hard the first time around.

He also says France has not found a single case of someone having had covid in the Spring and then getting it again now.

But his English isn't great (I know neither is mine), so I stopped listening after a while.

If you're interested it's one of UnHerd's offerings on youtube.
.Thanks . I will have a look.
 
So I switched to Dr John who points out that this 'deadly disease' is so far the worlds 14th biggest killer, yet the world is throwing billions of $$$ at it:

View attachment 507038

You'll also notice that most (if not all) the much more dangerous diseases are preventable too.
While I generally agree with you on this thread that's not a great metric for comparisons. A lot of those worldwide causes of death are things not really applicable to the UK / Western Europe.

Do the same thing for causes of death in the UK and COVID has a noticeably bigger impact.
 
Amazing isn't it how making serious efforts to stop a disease from spreading prevents lots of people from dying.
This is something else that's been bugging me. If there is a massive increase in deaths between now and February I will happily hold my hands up and admit I got it wrong. I get the feeling that if there is a massive spike in deaths you will (justifiably) say "I told you so" but if nothing much happens you will argue that it was the policies put in place that prevented those deaths.

Basically, I get the feeling that you and several other people on here are arguing a 'heads I win, tails you lose' situation. Is there anything that will make you change your mind and accept that COVID isn't as dangerous as you currently think?
 
And yet from ABC Valencia
"Coronavirus infections in minors between 0 and 9 years old in the Valencian Community has shot up more than 35 percent in recent weeks, coinciding with the start of the school year. "

"The period between September 7 - the day on which face-to-face classes and many other extracurricular activities were resumed - and the last records on the 22nd of the same month has resulted in 710 new positives detected in that age group. "


"109 educational centers in the Valencian Community have had to confine some of their groups when detecting positive for coronavirus among students or teachers."

"In particular they have been 1 53 classrooms of the three provinces that have been affected by the pandemic during the first days of the academic year up to the 18 September-."


Which naturally means they are then spreading it to their family members - which is the point about why some think we cannot just shield our elderly because it will find a way of getting to them. Although as said before - and seems to be ignored by a lot of people who - evidence that we should be wary of Long COVID.

Although it's good to see the problems from exposure in survivors are starting to be discussed in the media - it's never made much sense to me to discuss this thing in binary terms of life/death: Beware comforting lies about a 'herd immunity' Covid-19 strategy. Here's why it's dangerous – Professor Devi Sridhar
 
I could never find it again but I read that in the UK 43% of tests carried out since schools returned in September were for under 18's. Ridiculous actions.
Not as ridiculous as it sounds. If a child has symptoms that indicate possible COVID-19 infection (dry cough, high temperature etc.) then said child should stay at home and have a COVID test. If test is positive then a large number of children should be sent home from school.

It's a choice between testing young ones with possible COVID symptoms and keeping the majority of kids in school or not testing them and sending huge chunks of the school population home for 2 weeks on the grounds that someone might have COVID. Then everyone in the family of those kids kept home from school also get 14 days quarantine with impact on jobs etc. The testing is the better option in my opinion.

Edit - just for a sense of scale, I don't think my current place has had fewer than 8 kids off per day with potential COVID infections and waiting for a test. Plus the first month or so is sniffles time as the little horrors all come back with a variety of colds that spread like wildfire.
 
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While I generally agree with you on this thread that's not a great metric for comparisons. A lot of those worldwide causes of death are things not really applicable to the UK / Western Europe.

Do the same thing for causes of death in the UK and COVID has a noticeably bigger impact.

I've repeatedly heard the phrase 'deadly virus' and I think it just gives some context to understand that there's far more deadly phenomena out in the world.

But if you want to talk about the UK, we have 450 cancer deaths, on average, everyday. Cancer doesn't peak or trough, it's 450 (on average) every day, week-in-week-out, year-in-year-out.

An oncologist reckons we've got 60,000 excess cancer deaths lined up due to the lockdown policies.

But but coronavirus...
 
I've repeatedly heard the phrase 'deadly virus' and I think it just gives some context to understand that there's far more deadly phenomena out in the world.

But if you want to talk about the UK, we have 450 cancer deaths, on average, everyday. Cancer doesn't peak or trough, it's 450 (on average) every day, week-in-week-out, year-in-year-out.

An oncologist reckons we've got 60,000 excess cancer deaths lined up due to the lockdown policies.

But but coronavirus...
Agreed but if you look at UK deaths versus worldwide COVID-19 jumps from 14th leading cause of death to about 3rd or 4th for this year so far. I did post the link to the ONS stats for that on here last week I think, I can dig it out over the weekend if anyone cares.
 

AfricaExpat

Old-Salt
The testing is the better option in my opinion.
If the testing was any good then I can readily accept the argument but if more people are false positives than true positives it quickly ends up in exponential testing growth and a massive increase in "cases" even if they are not real.

There is a real increase in true cases from the lowest level in July and I would put it at about three times. The testing would suggest it is ten times. This bad use of data is skewing policy.
 
I've repeatedly heard the phrase 'deadly virus' and I think it just gives some context to understand that there's far more deadly phenomena out in the world.

But if you want to talk about the UK, we have 450 cancer deaths, on average, everyday. Cancer doesn't peak or trough, it's 450 (on average) every day, week-in-week-out, year-in-year-out.

An oncologist reckons we've got 60,000 excess cancer deaths lined up due to the lockdown policies.

But but coronavirus...

top tip, cancer isnt an infectious transmittable virus,
 
Agreed but if you look at UK deaths versus worldwide COVID-19 jumps from 14th leading cause of death to about 3rd or 4th for this year so far. I did post the link to the ONS stats for that on here last week I think, I can dig it out over the weekend if anyone cares.

And that's with full lockdown implemented and single digit infection rates in the population.
 
I started reading that, but stopped when it started talking about 'locking away the elderly for a year'.

Any argument that appeals to emotion is just manipulation.

It's bollocks also. Have a listen to Prof Gupta's policy about how this can be avoided on Question Time.

You should have finished it - he really knows his stuff.

(Although his point about shielding the elderly was made half way down, so guessing you read quite a lot).

What did Prof Gupta say about Long COVID btw?
 
Agreed but if you look at UK deaths versus worldwide COVID-19 jumps from 14th leading cause of death to about 3rd or 4th for this year so far. I did post the link to the ONS stats for that on here last week I think, I can dig it out over the weekend if anyone cares.

Dementia is one of the leading causes of death in the UK.

18% of deaths involving covid had dementia as an underlying health problem.

I really think this inflates our covid cases by about 18%.
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And if we could encourage more people - particularly the over 65s who 3/4 are overweight or obese - to exercise/lose weight, then that would help greatly too.
 
And that's with full lockdown implemented and single digit infection rates in the population.
Not the argument ending statement it sounds like. Once you get past cancer, heart disease and respiratory illness the number of deaths drops massively. A bit like saying a country has the 7th largest army in the world, once you get past the Chinese, Russians, US and North Koreans it's all a bit irrelevant.



Knew I'd posted it somewhere recently - Deaths involving COVID-19, England and Wales - Office for National Statistics is the source for the data. I haven't checked to see if it's been updated for the July data yet.

Edit - in the interests of transparency those are deaths with COVID mentioned on the death certificate.
 

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