MERS Coronavirus warning

There's an interesting situation in Canada revolving around a certain minority group who seem to be experiencing unusually high rates of COVID-19 infection. The press are tiptoeing around the subject so it's hard to find a news story which is willing to put their cards on the table and say what they mean instead of waffling about and telling people to show compassion and not discriminate against them. From the sounds of things they must be getting absolutely hammered for it to be making the news multiple times.

They're a group who refuse to integrate with the rest of society, who keep their own language, religious customs, and distinctive form of dress and don't associate with others outside their group.

You all know exactly whom I'm talking about. Yes, it's "low germans", which seems to be the new politically correct way of referring to them, as opposed to "Mennonites" as most people know them. There's also been vague mention of Doukhobors and Hutterites being hit as well, although I don't hear as much about them as unlike the Mennonites they don't live in my area.

They live in relatively sparsely inhabited rural areas, don't take public transit, don't deal with the general public on a frequent face to face basis, and don't have any of the usual high risk factors people associate with COVID-19. The problems seem to revolve around their lifestyle, where they engage in communal meals, regular religious gatherings, and inadequate social distancing. COVID-19 can spread rapidly in that sort of environment once it finds a way in, and so it has.

This may not be earth-shattering news, but it's an interesting situation to keep in mind when thinking about how COVID-19 spreads in different societies.
As a group they would be less prone to infection from without but much more vulnerable once it is within the group.
 
so basically, Sweden is actually more like Scotland than England.

time to compare neeps and krispbrot.
Funnily enough Scotland has half the population of Sweden and has had almost half the number of deaths that Sweden has.

But but but Scotland locked down hard and Sweden didn't, yet similar death rates.

Weird.
 

Niamac

GCM
Funnily enough Scotland has half the population of Sweden and has had almost half the number of deaths that Sweden has.

But but but Scotland locked down hard and Sweden didn't, yet similar death rates.

Weird.
Yes the Swedes have a current run rate of about 20 deaths a week and Scotland has not had a death for some time.
What is impressive is the consistency of the decline in deaths in Sweden.

Covid Trends

However that is about their health service performance The circulating virus is still producing about 370 new cases a week.

 
Yes the Swedes have a current run rate of about 20 deaths a week and Scotland has not had a death for some time.
What is impressive is the consistency of the decline in deaths in Sweden.

Covid Trends

However that is about their health service performance The circulating virus is still producing about 370 new cases a week.

Sweden population 10 million.
Scotland population 5 million.

Swedish Covid deaths: 5,763
Scotland Covid deaths: 4,208,

Sources for death stats:


Sweden has beaten Scotland yet they didn't lock down hard.

Weird.
 
Sweden population 10 million.
Scotland population 5 million.

Swedish Covid deaths: 5,763
Scotland Covid deaths: 4,208,

Sources for death stats:


Sweden has beaten Scotland yet they didn't lock down hard.

Weird.
distance in a rural setting gives an effective hard lockdown.
 
distance in a rural setting gives an effective hard lockdown.
The majority of Swedes live in one of three densely populated urban areas.

The vast majority of <16 year olds didn't miss school.

Pubs, clubs and restaurants stayed open. Sweden is Europe's biggest cinema operator by box office revenue.

They didn't have an 'effective hard lockdown' at all.
 
The majority of Swedes live in one of three densely populated urban areas.

The vast majority of <16 year olds didn't miss school.

Pubs, clubs and restaurants stayed open. Sweden is Europe's biggest cinema operator by box office revenue.

They didn't have an 'effective hard lockdown' at all.
a town in Sweden is anything With over 10,000 people.

we’d call them a village.
 

Niamac

GCM
Sweden has beaten Scotland yet they didn't lock down hard.
This isn't a competitive sport. There are all sorts of reasons for what happened; the appalling state of health of a large part of our population, a less than perfect and less generously funded NHS, a UK government that ignored the lessons of Cygnus and so on.

We are where we are and what we do now is the important thing. The next big issue is the effects of opening schools and, as I said, Scotland will be opening next week and we see what happens then. It gives England a bit of a steer. Whether they use it wisely we'll see.

As far as I can see the key thing will be the effectiveness of the testing and tracing regime. Personally I would put a lot more effort and support into the local Directors' of Public Health operation and less on the half-arsed centralised fantasy under Dido Harding.
 
That's really the point I was trying to make. Even Finland and Scotland, both of which have recently recorded very low rates of infection, have had periodic spikes. The question in RUK is whether it will be possible to continue as is and deal with spikes or will the residual circulating virus seize the opportunity when schools open. The Scottish figures should give us an insight shortly.

The one up here is thanks to the youngsters, including footballers, for going on a pub crawl in Aberdeen and ignoring social distancing.
 
As a group they would be less prone to infection from without but much more vulnerable once it is within the group.
This is the thing. Even those groups who are as isolated from the rest of society as Mennonites couldn't avoid the virus as a group. It still found a way in.

The idea that a group of people within a society can isolate as a group doesn't seem to work. Everyone has to do the hand washing, mask wearing, and "socially distancing" thing on an individual basis and the overall rate of infection in society as a whole has to be kept low.
 
And here's the Saturday COVID-19 summary.
Coronavirus: What's happening around the world on Saturday

Deaths from COVID-19 in Brazil were expected to reach 100,000 on Saturday, and to continue to climb after that.
Brazil's death toll from COVID-19 is expected to hit 100,000 on Saturday and continue to climb as most Brazilian cities reopen shops and dining, even though the pandemic has yet to peak.
Brazil had their first recorded COVID-19 case at the end of February. In the first 3 months, 50,000 people died. It only took 50 days for the next 50,000 to die.
The country reported its first cases of the novel coronavirus at the end of February. The virus took three months to kill 50,000 people and just 50 days to kill the next 50,000.
In Germany, travellers arriving from most non-EU countries and some high-risk countries inside the EU will have to undergo compulsory testing starting Saturday.
Travellers arriving in Germany from most non-European Union countries and some regions within the bloc that have high numbers of coronavirus cases will have to undergo compulsory testing, starting Saturday.
In the US, the state of Hawaii will be starting the school year with remote learning only, due to a spike in cases. Hospital beds have been filling up, and beaches, parks, and hiking trails have been closed. In a previous post I mentioned that Hawaii was trying to get the tourist business going again and were accepting travellers from all over. I imagine it's not going to be that easy to persuade tourists to come and spend their money if everything is closed.
In the United States, Hawaii's public school students will begin the academic year with remote learning only, after a spike of coronavirus cases.

Gov. David Ige said students will spend the first four weeks of the school year learning online from home, putting on hold plans to alternate between online and in-person classes.

Oahu has seen the majority of new cases in recent weeks, filling up hospital beds and spurring officials to close beaches, parks and hiking trails.
 
This story is about a small village in Alaska whose only way in or out by land is through British Columbia. The area is surrounded by mountains and glaciers, and there's nothing else around it.
How the border closure in March cut off the only 19-year-old in Hyder, Alaska, from his friends

Residents in the US village are allowed to have one family member enter Canada for 3 hours, once per week, to shop, buy gasoline, bank, etc., but cannot meet people or socialise.

This is apparently rough on the people on the American side of the border, as they are basically stuck there and can't meet with friends in Canada.

It's an interesting story and has some good photos of the surrounding scenery.
 
The annual motorcycle rally in Sturgis South Dakota USA attracts hundreds of thousands of bikers each year to the 10 day event. The 80th annual rally is going ahead this year, pandemic or no pandemic, and it kicked off on Friday.
Harleys everywhere, but masks not so plentiful at South Dakota biker rally

Crowds are expected to be down from a normal year, but they're still expecting 250,000 this year.

South Dakota has no mask requirements or limits on indoor crowds and the state governor is eager to see tourists. Few masks were in sight and the same was true for social distancing.

"Screw COVID," read the design on one T-shirt being hawked. "I went to Sturgis."
People will have come to Stugis from all over the US. After 10 days of drinking in bars, attending concerts, and meeting friends, they will ride back to their homes all over the US.

Given the typical demographic of the American biker crowd which leans heavily towards the middle aged and overweight, this could get interesting.
 
This isn't a competitive sport.
Sure, but to ignore the experience of other countries would be a bit daft.

The fact is that Scotland is doing a lot worse than Sweden and Scotland's had a much tougher lockdown.

And now it's imposing local lockdowns when the initial one hasn't worked, when compared with Sweden.
 
Sure, but to ignore the experience of other countries would be a bit daft.

The fact is that Scotland is doing a lot worse than Sweden and Scotland's had a much tougher lockdown.

And now it's imposing local lockdowns when the initial one hasn't worked, when compared with Sweden.
when and where was this ’tough lockdown’?
 
An observation:

On Tuesday last week at around 1500 I stopped at the M1 Tibshelf Service station in order to break my journey to Winterfell.

In the space of 20 minutes I had clear sight of the entrance/exit. In that time I would estimate that IRO 150 people of all ages passed by my vehicle.

Without exception the customers/service users entering and leaving the building that were:

* Masked Up.

* Socially Distancing.

* Controlling and directing the movement of children/younger siblings.

Did not seem to be of a BAME persuasion.

I am living in a part of the country that is currently subject to additional measures despite the fact that the immediate local area has one of the lowest "R" rates in England but regrettably has a number of towns and cities that appear to have significantly large numbers of people living in them who seem to demonstrate by means of behaviour that they are immune from Covid 19 or whatever the "mot de jour" happens to be.

Already dug in to Stage III and awaiting incoming........Out
 
The 4,507 "new" cases recorded in Spain on Thursday is slightly misleading. They added ones from previous periods to the total and the number of actual new cases recorded was 1,895. Still a high number but 60% were asymptomatic and counted the random testing they carried out in households.

The number of cases reported, by all means, has been almost 15,000 in the last week but the number of deaths over that week was 26. More worryingly is the number of hospitalised cases which accounted for 677 over the last week.

There are no weekend figures for Spain as they don't trust them being reported correctly. It will mean a massive rise on Monday or Tuesday, though.

Now about 10 municipalities on total or semi-lockdown, as the number of outbreaks increase. Not just UK that has the raves and gatherings as they stopped a party in a disco and the organisers are now facing a fine up to €600,000. Most other outbreaks are in families, getting together in the August shut down and visiting relations.

The beach at Guardamar (first pic) was closed due to the capacity being exceeded over the weekend.
1596992462988.png


Looks pretty deserted compared to some of the pictures in the UK press about British beaches.
The beaches in Torrevieja have 4 sq m areas marked out with 20% of the areas reserved for us doddery old buggers. All chairs, towels, clothing and so on must remain in that 4 sq m (along with you, of course) and face masks necessary when walking on the beach but not whilst sunbathing or swimming.
 

happyuk

War Hero
If masks are so darn efficacious, we should be able to defeat the flu this year without a vaccine. Right?
 

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