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MERS Coronavirus warning

Can they get back again?
If any Canadians visit Hawaii they will need to self-isolate for two weeks after return. Getting there isn't going to be that easy either, as currently only about 3 or 4 airports in Canada are conducting international flights.

To add to all of this, airlines and hotels are going to be going broke, so you might book a flight and hotel now, but they go broke before you leave. Or the hotel goes broke while you're there, and service deteriorates badly. Or service is bad from day one, because they're on their last gasp. Or the airline go broke while you're there, and the alternatives are charging eyewateringly high rates for a last minute one-way booking home. Or the state goes into lockdown while you are there, and you spend your vacation restricted to your hotel room. Etc.

There were Canadian families stuck abroad in the spring and having to spend $20,000 plus on flights to get home when their original airline cancelled their flight. The Canadian government offered aid to people stuck abroad, but it was in the form of a loan, which of course must be paid back.

There's probably a good reason why fewer than a third of Canadians said they would be willing to travel anywhere by air, and fewer than 17% said they would be willing to fly to the US.
 
(...) Edit to add comment on economy - I think your data is not up to date. Google FT article "Swedish companies reap benefits of countries Covid-19 approach"
The article you cite is pay-walled so I can't read it.

However, let's take your short quote from it:
"Economists and central banks forecast that Sweden’s GDP this year should decline by about 5 per cent, broadly in line with Norway and Denmark and far better than the likes of Italy, the UK or France. "

In my post which you quoted part of, but not the following, I had said:
Their death rate is 5 to 10 times worse than that of their neighbours. Meanwhile their economy was as bad or worse.
And your own quote from your source does not disagree with that.

So Sweden had 5 to 10 times the death rate of their closest and most comparable neighbours, but their economy at best will do no better? And that's success in your view?

Here's the post where I addressed the issue in more detail. The Swedish growth numbers are based on Swedish central bank data, and the numbers you cite for Swedish GDP decline are actually worse than the Swedish one that I used, so if anything Sweden are doing significantly worse than I had said.
Here's what I had said.
Sweden's central bank expects their economy to contract by 4.5% for the year as a whole (we're talking about full year, not just a few months). Unemployment has risen to 9%. The overall damage to the Swedish economy means recovery will be slow and unemployment will remain high.
 

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
I like to think that us Brits are if nothing else, we are very adaptable.

The current trend from the varied underclass for causing panic and offence to others is now spitting or something involving bodily fluid being thrown about.

Now, our customers have never been shy about spitting at others, or biting and of course the ultimate protest against the Polis or Feds of swamping themselves/defecating on themselves/the van/the cell/each other or constructing meaningful messages with their own body waste ( dirty Protest ).....not limited to any class or sex or colour, its quite a universal joy.

But there is a massive upsurge in persons being spat at, having spit soaked hands smeared on them, door handles,buttons and public areas being smeared by bodily fluids.....and not always by the usual teenage suspects either.

As if you need another reason to be paranoid about touching stuff in public.
 
With the high increase in new cases in Spain (although it has been claimed that 80% are asymptomatic) I suppose it was inevitable that the death rate would rise. 26 deaths yesterday when it has been between 1 and 6 even with the high numbers of cases in July. State of alarm ended June 21st and new cases rose by a factor of 10x in July.

Two new areas north of Madrid have reverted back to lockdown bringing it to 8 municipalities now in full lockdown (no movement in or out except for essential reasons) and 2 others being reviewed.

Spain has stopped issuing daily total of cases over the weekends due to the difficulty in getting proper figures then so announced the weekend total of just over 3,000 along with the total yesterday of 1178 giving a total announced today of nearly 5,000. Considering new cases were in the low hundreds and even below 100 for most of June, the numbers started going up above 1,000 again on July 16th and there hasn't been a day below 1,000 since then.

Min of Health says the majority of the over 500 outbreaks are small and contained among the younger age groups (under 40) due to social gatherings plus still concerns over workplaces like factories showing outbreaks and the itinerant field workers who share accommodation.

Fines in some areas are being increased a lot. Still 100 euro fine for not wearing a mask in public (rising to up to 3,000 if you argue) but Andalusia (Costa del Sol) has introduced fines of between 60,000 euro (for those who fail to implement the sanitary provisions where 100 people or more can be affected) up to 600,000 euro (for those organising mass get togethers or providing false information to the authorities and even opening proscribed areas).

In this area, I've seen the police pull over people for carrying the mask or not having it on properly (under the nose seems popular) but they've just been warned and I haven't seen anyone fined. A bar in a small town near me reported the police told them customers on the terrace must wear a mask except when actually eating or drinking and that both the customer and the owner would be fined. Saying that, the customers sitting outside the bars and restaurants I've been passed aren't doing that, just removing the mask when they are seated).

Still no menus, chalkboards or enter a code on your mobile to order what you want.

Went to a supermarket in a shopping mall the other day. No crowds, all wearing masks (except for one who removed it to talk on her mobile and a security guard told her to put it back on), Hand gel on entering the mall, hand gel on entering the arcade where the supermarket is, hand get to actually enter the supermarket. Gloves seem to have gone by the board except at the fresh bakery section and the fruit and veg section which you are told to put in a pedal bin once you've made your choice. They are accepting money but signs everywhere cards are preferred. We used an automatic check out "Objecto no identificado en el area de ensacado" and a woman popped over and disinfected it all once we'd finished.

Local hospital, covering an area with about 180,000 people, has now 8 in patients with it which is up from zero at the end of June.
 
Ireland has removed 5 of the 15 countries from own green list

move to phase 4 reopening (larger events >200 outdoors and >50 indoors and non-food serving pubs reopening) delayed for another 3 weeks.

pubs serving food now have to close at 11pm

Face covering on retail premises will be law from 10 August
 
Weatherspoons opened in Wales. Lots of local on-line rage about the way they treated their staff. Their staff say they were treated fine and were all paid on furlough. We all know it's about Brexit.

It was pretty busy this morning; full of elderly gammon when I went.

I've no complaints about their breakfast apart from the lack of condiments.
 
Weatherspoons opened in Wales. Lots of local on-line rage about the way they treated their staff. Their staff say they were treated fine and were all paid on furlough. We all know it's about Brexit.

It was pretty busy this morning; full of elderly gammon when I went.

I've no complaints about their breakfast apart from the lack of condiments.
The Wetherspoons I went into yesterday is trying to encourage people in with half price food and alcohol free drinks (max discount £10 per person per order) Monday-Wednesday. Given the number of fliers they had I presume that's across England at least.

There was also a double page article in their in-house magazine repeating the same points you said above about staff wages. It says something about the state of journalism when a company rag has a better presented and researched article than most of the mainstream press. If I go back tomorrow I'll get a picture, I was quite impressed how the points made were backed up with relevant quotes (dates and authors included) so anyone could double check.
 
The Wetherspoons I went into yesterday is trying to encourage people in with half price food and alcohol free drinks (max discount £10 per person per order) Monday-Wednesday. Given the number of fliers they had I presume that's across England at least.

£7 for two breakfasts, a pint of pepsi max and a coffee.

Bargain.

We used the Weatherspoons app to order and pay; no problems, really quick service too.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
@Grumblegrunt will be along shortly to tell you you are telling lies and talking shit.

not at all, most viruses and bacterial lung infections effect the system. the longer you are down the more muscle wastage you get and that includes the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. especially in the elderly but then it is their job to begin the care pathway once they retire.

this was known months ago along with many more possible symptoms, the long term effects are of more interest to the virologists and immunologist than the non plague it has become. there's a huge debate about whether it has dengue characteristics due to the number of documented second infections proving worse than the first symptom wise although still not fatal for 99.96% of the population.

and post viral fatigue is an issue for many but like GW syndrome has yet to be properly studied or proven. around 4% of recovered cases are said to have some long term effects but they are only the ones who report them. I got hayfever for the first time ever this year which was interesting though no idea if it is related to my miracle springing from my death bed after three days of being a bit poorly in feb.

gastrointestinal symptoms are also in the long term effects because you can catch it via the faecal oral route as well with the gut taking longer to fight it off - influenza does the same and it is the commonest way of a spread in primary schools.

but don't let that spoil your bitterness because I didn't agree with you.
 
Thats not the curve that they were referring to when they first bandied the term about though.
Indeed. The curve that frightened some people and made me think the lockdown might not be an overreaction was the Lancet study which predicted intensive care units would be overwhelmed. The issue was the number of people requiring intensive care beds, probably also requiring mechanical ventilation.

Those numbers seem to have been a massive overestimate.
 
No, we couldn't. Hand washing, social distancing, no large gatherings, definitely no indoor large gatherings, along with protecting the vulnerable better, would ensure hospitals wouldn't get overwhelmed.

Calm down. I agree with you that lockdown is a blunt instrument but thats not normal jogging your describing is it?
 

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