MERS Coronavirus warning

Truxx

LE
The mrs' brother and wife were round yesterday for a BBQ and a serious amount of alcohol (as you do on a Sunday) and she runs about 25% of the global supply chain for one of the global pharmas. Anyway. Last time she as round, which was before lockdown, she was telling us the position was basically drop everything for Covid. What she said yesterday was the view is that they will not find a vaccine for Covid. The pharam has very low confidence in it happening.

Death, taxes and Covid 19 boys and girls......
Chimes with what Son-in Law said. Even if a vaccine is found its efficacy will be very limited.
 
Have there been any confirmed cases of someone contracting covid-19 making a full recovery and then getting a brand new case of covid-19?

I.e not just a case of a false negative test followed by a positive test or an infection going dormant for a while.

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I've not heard of any cases of someone being ill with COVID-19, recovering, and then becoming ill again. All the cases that I have heard of were someone was ill, recovered, tested negative, and then tested positive while showing no symptoms. The PCR test can apparently pick up fragments of RNA from "dead" viruses for some time after someone has recovered. This apparently is not unusual with other diseases. Limitations of the test are why in some places a person is not considered to have fully recovered unless there have been two consecutive negative tests taken at least 48 hours apart, as you can get both false positives and false negatives.

Some medical experts have said that it is theoretically possible for someone with a weak immune system to get re-infected, but those cases are expected to be very rare and not enough to be statistically significant in terms of something on the scale of a pandemic.
 
I've not heard of any cases of someone being ill with COVID-19, recovering, and then becoming ill again. All the cases that I have heard of were someone was ill, recovered, tested negative, and then tested positive while showing no symptoms. The PCR test can apparently pick up fragments of RNA from "dead" viruses for some time after someone has recovered. This apparently is not unusual with other diseases. Limitations of the test are why in some places a person is not considered to have fully recovered unless there have been two consecutive negative tests taken at least 48 hours apart, as you can get both false positives and false negatives.

Some medical experts have said that it is theoretically possible for someone with a weak immune system to get re-infected, but those cases are expected to be very rare and not enough to be statistically significant in terms of something on the scale of a pandemic.
i‘ll wait out on that one
 
I was with a persistent cough in January, bad throat and difficulty breathing with pains in chest on breathing. Was it Covid19? Absolutely no idea but I have never had such pains before in the chest and have also had the whole range of pneumonia shots.

A lot of the information coming out is just conjecture, such as the fully airborne/not fully airborne argument. The issue with re infection is again not proven either way. If re infection does occur in a healthy individual*, it is most likely a mutant strain. The explanation normally given is that PCR tests will show positive test even with non functional viruses, eg fragments of binding proteins. Again, insufficient research has not been done and at the moment, a lot of research pathways are a bit unethical.

* Re infection of the same strain should really only occur in immunocompromised people.

I agree with others that a lot of people recovering have lungs in a mess and are finding it hard to recover. I think there have even been a few lung transplants but this would be a rare occurence.
It is the worst cold I ever had, and I ended up with pneumonia for a couple of months. I took a cabinet full of vitamins and minerals to moderate my immune response. I am still getting over it. It really is the worst cold I have ever had.

That is why I call it the cold from next door to hell.

But for all the experts that "haven't heard of anyone catching "covid disease" a second time... a reminder that they are also now calling it "coronavirus disease" so it includes all coronavirus... after including half a dozen syndromes into it's own syndrome (cold, flu, pneumonia, sniffles, ARDS, MODS, etc.). Therefore, "covid disease" can be anything they want it to be.

But as far as coronaviruses and colds go, no one ever truly develops a complete immunity to them, they merely get more resistant through multiple exposures over their entire life. You see it as kids get less and less colds as they get older. And then one day, who knows when, after multiple random exposures, your immune system decides to freak out and kill you instead of the virus.

Of course this can happen with other viruses... but it is more of a guarantee with coronaviruses, and everyone continue getting a bit of the cold, forever.
 
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Especially in those parts of the country which have not yet been exposed to the virus in any concentration yet.
Yup. The cold is going to kill us all. Eventually.
 
Why? You were sure enough of it to assert it as fact (again) a few posts ago.
suggest you read the lads post again.

’Some medical experts have said that it is theoretically possible for someone with a weak immune system to get re-infected, but those cases are expected to be very rare and not enough to be statistically significant in terms of something on the scale of a pandemic.’

I’ll wait out because I am not convinced, but happy to be proved wrong. In other words I’ll stick with my original assertion.
 
suggest you read the lads post again.

Some medical experts have said that it is theoretically possible for someone with a weak immune system to get re-infected, but those cases are expected to be very rare and not enough to be statistically significant in terms of something on the scale of a pandemic.’

I’ll wait out because I am not convinced, but happy to be proved wrong. In other words I’ll stick with my original assertion.
and people that have already had it can reinfect. So basically everyone is vulnerable
 
suggest you read the lads post again.

’Some medical experts have said that it is theoretically possible for someone with a weak immune system to get re-infected, but those cases are expected to be very rare and not enough to be statistically significant in terms of something on the scale of a pandemic.’

I’ll wait out because I am not convinced, but happy to be proved wrong. In other words I’ll stick with my original assertion.
There's two ways of looking at things. One is from the point of view of an individual. Could you, personally, get COVID-19 twice? It's theoretically possible, given the right personal circumstances. For example, suppose your immune system was weak due to cancer treatment or organ transplant. If you are in certain health categories, that is a real possibility.

The other point of view is would this be common enough among the population to sustain widespread infection which would keep the pandemic going over the long term? Scientific opinion is that this is very unlikely.

So you need to look at your own personal risk factors and make a judgement on that. Your personal fate however, as much as it may matter to your family and friends, won't determine the course of the pandemic as a whole.

The above is from a short term perspective. Scientists do say though that an immune response can fade over time, say over five years, such that you could get sick again some years down the road if the virus starts making the rounds again. This is not unusual with immune responses, which is why some vaccinations need regular booster shots.

Scientists making educated guesses on what is likely say that it is probable that if and when a vaccine is developed we will need regular re-vaccination to maintain immunity. That might be annually or every five years, or some other time period. We don't know the answer to that at present.

It is not however safe to assume that just because you had really bad flu symptoms earlier this year that you are now immune to COVID-19. Unless it was confirmed by a test that you actually did have COVID-19, you just don't know. It might have been just a bad case of some other flu and the actual COVID-19 could far worse than you imagine.
 
The following is a rather interesting story on how genetic analysis of the COVID-19 virus is being used in Canada to help track the spread of the disease in ways that may help to contain it.
Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

An example of how this will be used is for example suppose a care home develops 10 cases of COVID-19. Genetic analysis could tell health officials whether this was the result of 1 case which spread between 10 residents, or whether it came into the home with multiple different visitors. Knowing which of these happened will help determine where infection control went wrong and so help prevent similar incidents in future.
Knowing how the virus spread will show where there were weaknesses in public health measures early on, said McArthur. Being able to keep divining genetic codes from samples will mean when there are flare-ups of cases, they can be quickly compared to each other to see if they're all related or are coming from multiple sources.

It means, for example, a long-term care centre should be able to quickly know if its 10 new cases are because one case spread widely or arose from multiple carriers coming into the facility.

"That's a very different infection-control problem," said McArthur.
Another use is that telling where imported cases are coming from will help determine where the risks are in international travel. For example, in New York the virus there came from Europe, not China or Iran. In Canada, much if it was from Canadians returning home from the US and passing through New York state in early March.
 
In California, the state has had to re-impose a number of control measures to deal with the rapidly rising infection rate.
Coronavirus: What's happening around the world on July 13
California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday extended the closure of bars and indoor dining statewide and has ordered gyms, churches and hair salons closed in most places as coronavirus cases keep rising in the nation's most populated state.

On July 1, Newsom ordered many counties to close bars and indoor operations at restaurants, wineries, zoos and family entertainment centres like bowling alleys and miniature golf.

The Democratic governor extended that order statewide Monday. He also imposed additional restrictions on the 30 counties with rising numbers, including the most populated of Los Angeles and San Diego, by ordering worship services to stop and gyms, hair salons, indoor malls and offices for noncritical industries to shut down.

"The data suggests not everybody is practising common sense," said Newsom, whose order takes effect immediately.
California was one of the first states to impose a lock-down, but lifted most of the measures in May due to concerns about the economic effects, when they were still seeing thousands of new cases per day.
In March, California was the first state to issue a mandatory, statewide stay-at-home order to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The order appeared to work as cases stabilized in the ensuing weeks while other states grappled with huge increases.

But the order devastated the world's fifth-largest economy, with more than 7.5 million people filing for unemployment benefits. Newsom moved quickly to let most businesses reopen in May. Like other states that took similar steps, a subsequent rise in cases and hospitalizations led him to impose new restrictions this month.
The following chart shows the 5 US states with the highest new infection rates. New York is shown as a dotted line for comparison. Take the relative height of the New York curve with a degree of caution however, as testing capacity may not have been as high then. On the other hand, some of the states showing experiencing high infection rates now are also showing high rates of positive tests, suggesting that infection rates are undercounted there as well. (If a lot of your tests are coming back positive, then you're probably missing a lot of cases).

us-13-jul.png


Elsewhere in the world, the general director of the WHO said that "too many countries are headed in the wrong direction." He also said that politicians sending "mixed messages" are "undermining the most critical ingredient of any response: trust." He also said that things are "going to get worse and worse and worse" if countries don't get the basics right.
The WHO director general said that while numerous countries have now brought their previously explosive outbreaks under control, namely those in Europe and Asia, "too many countries are headed in the wrong direction."

Without naming specific politicians, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus also chastised political leaders for their "mixed messages" amid the coronavirus outbreaks, saying that they are "undermining the most critical ingredient of any response: trust."

"If the basics aren't followed, there is only one way this pandemic is going to go," Ghebreyesus said Monday. "It's going to get worse and worse and worse."
India, which have the third highest numbers of new infections after the US and Brazil, reported a new record of numbers of cases. Lock-down has been re-imposed in a number of cities.
Meanwhile, India — which has the most confirmed virus cases after the United States and Brazil — on Monday reported a record daily surge of 28,701 new cases reported in the past 24 hours. Authorities in several cities are reinstating strict lockdowns after attempting to loosen things up to revive an ailing economy
 
There's two ways of looking at things. One is from the point of view of an individual. Could you, personally, get COVID-19 twice? It's theoretically possible, given the right personal circumstances. For example, suppose your immune system was weak due to cancer treatment or organ transplant. If you are in certain health categories, that is a real possibility.

The other point of view is would this be common enough among the population to sustain widespread infection which would keep the pandemic going over the long term? Scientific opinion is that this is very unlikely.

So you need to look at your own personal risk factors and make a judgement on that. Your personal fate however, as much as it may matter to your family and friends, won't determine the course of the pandemic as a whole.

The above is from a short term perspective. Scientists do say though that an immune response can fade over time, say over five years, such that you could get sick again some years down the road if the virus starts making the rounds again. This is not unusual with immune responses, which is why some vaccinations need regular booster shots.

Scientists making educated guesses on what is likely say that it is probable that if and when a vaccine is developed we will need regular re-vaccination to maintain immunity. That might be annually or every five years, or some other time period. We don't know the answer to that at present.

It is not however safe to assume that just because you had really bad flu symptoms earlier this year that you are now immune to COVID-19. Unless it was confirmed by a test that you actually did have COVID-19, you just don't know. It might have been just a bad case of some other flu and the actual COVID-19 could far worse than you imagine.
If that was the case, why have Governments (globally) reacted to the extent that they have? It makes no sense.

All the evidence points to this being grim, by which I dont mean the end of man kind - I mean 10-20% population reduction.

I'm seeing someone in August who is seriously in the know. Cant spill the beans on who it is but I'll get a proper low-down and if I can, I'll post what I think is reasonable without compromising them
 

crow_bag

Old-Salt
If that was the case, why have Governments (globally) reacted to the extent that they have? It makes no sense.

All the evidence points to this being grim, by which I dont mean the end of man kind - I mean 10-20% population reduction.

I'm seeing someone in August who is seriously in the know. Cant spill the beans on who it is but I'll get a proper low-down and if I can, I'll post what I think is reasonable without compromising them
What evidence points to it being a 10-20% reduction in the world's population and over what sort of timescale?

10% of the world's population would be about 780,000,000.

And world wide reported deaths haven't even reached 1,000,000 yet.



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Dafty duck

On ROPS
On ROPs
If that was the case, why have Governments (globally) reacted to the extent that they have? It makes no sense.

All the evidence points to this being grim, by which I dont mean the end of man kind - I mean 10-20% population reduction.

I'm seeing someone in August who is seriously in the know. Cant spill the beans on who it is but I'll get a proper low-down and if I can, I'll post what I think is reasonable without compromising them
Sorry, but that figure seems quite frankly absurd. From the last ONS publication looking at the number of symptomatic Vs asymptomatic positive cases, from that they were able to calculate a mortality rate of 0.1%, which is incidentally the number chucked about near the start of it all. They also said that between 70-80% of cases are asymptomatic. Of the remaining 20% around another 20% of those require some form of hospital treatment. Testing protocols previously only covered those admitted to hospital. Fair to say then that UK infection rate was massively under reported.

Also, there are no recorded examples of patients who weren't immune compromised being re-infected, False positives from the PCR method as previously mentioned. It's 3 consecutive negatives before you get the all clear in my neck of the woods.
 
I'm seeing someone in August who is seriously in the know. Cant spill the beans on who it is but I'll get a proper low-down and if I can, I'll post what I think is reasonable without compromising them
Do they work for the Umbrella Corporation?
 
Step-daughter who is a nurse was quite poorly in April and had two - three weeks off with severe flu-like symptoms, difficulty in breathing and loss of taste/smell. Had her antigen test results today: positive for Covid-19.

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Step-daughter who is a nurse was quite poorly in April and had two - three weeks off with severe flu-like symptoms, difficulty in breathing and loss of taste/smell. Had her antigen test results today: positive for Covid-19.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
Any symptoms persisting?
 

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