MERS Coronavirus warning

That report is for week ending July 4th.

It includes such gems as

"There are increases in the percentage of specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 and percentage of visits for ILI or CLI in multiple parts of the country."

"however, this past week included a holiday, which could impact both testing and reporting."

Perhaps we should wait just a minute until this week's data comes in to see what all the fuss is about with reimposing restrictions to prevent spread of infection
It is from the same report for the same week that was picked for the other jems that whoever was quoting and posting.

Should I switch to the Turning Point Evil China Wuhan Bat and Virus factory science-y investigative editorializing angle?
 
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Read that this morning and it made my blood boil. People going immediately into hospital after having landed in UK. Selfish cnuts know that they are (probably) seriously ill, so decide to jump on the plane, infect all those around them, and then take advantage of UK healthcare. Utter cnuts. The airlines are utter cnuts for allowing them to travel. And the government are utter cnuts for allowing this to happen.

We should immediately draw up a list of high risk countries (US included) and ban all travel from there at once. Passport holder or not, **** off unless you have a very, very recent test result.
The U.K. shouldn’t be allowing its own people to travel either
 
A 27 feet social distance was unsustainable for politicians but now the WHO is talking about "airborne" and "linger" so.. will this reseacher be cited?
I referred to this down thread. I would not hold your breath waiting for the research to be cited because it has likely not been done. It might have been but I can't find it.

What has been done is a collective of academics have suggested that the pathogen can remain airborne and linger in the air. A bit like measles virus could remain in the air in a room for at least 30 minutes after a carrier has been into that room. Exists in micro droplets.

This is against the widely spread idea that it falls to ground quickly by existing only in macro droplets.

The problem is that it is possible for it to be truly airborne from the point of view of chemists and fluid dynamicists but the research most likely has not been done to determine the degree of survival in droplets which are very small. This latter would be dependent of viral survivorship in small droplets and the number of viral particles needed to cause infection. It is currently set at 1000 virions but again, research?

The research will be done but I strongly suspect that the narrative will shift to suggest that it really only survives in large droplets and social distancing can be relaxed to 1m. This will be done to aid economic recovery.

It is wise, I think, to always take regard of one's own common sense and watch for abrupt policy changes which are likely based on population effects of the pandemic and not individual effects. We live or die as individuals, of course.
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
Why?

It isn’t under control in the UK!

the UK’s population is 11 times that of the Republic

Ireland has 25 new known cases yesterday the U.K. has 512 (45 times the number Ireland had)
You sound like that other clown Sturgeon: it's not a fecken competition.
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
It is if you're desperate for anything that makes the British (or English in Sturgeons case) look bad.



Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
And stats being stats:

ENG 92 in 1000
EIRE 420 in 1000

:?
 
I referred to this down thread. I would not hold your breath waiting for the research to be cited because it has likely not been done. It might have been but I can't find it.

What has been done is a collective of academics have suggested that the pathogen can remain airborne and linger in the air. A bit like measles virus could remain in the air in a room for at least 30 minutes after a carrier has been into that room. Exists in micro droplets.

This is against the widely spread idea that it falls to ground quickly by existing only in macro droplets.

The problem is that it is possible for it to be truly airborne from the point of view of chemists and fluid dynamicists but the research most likely has not been done to determine the degree of survival in droplets which are very small. This latter would be dependent of viral survivorship in small droplets and the number of viral particles needed to cause infection. It is currently set at 1000 virions but again, research?

The research will be done but I strongly suspect that the narrative will shift to suggest that it really only survives in large droplets and social distancing can be relaxed to 1m. This will be done to aid economic recovery.

It is wise, I think, to always take regard of one's own common sense and watch for abrupt policy changes which are likely based on population effects of the pandemic and not individual effects. We live or die as individuals, of course.
That the virus could be airborne (as opposed to just lobbed through the air on a ballistic trajectory) was known from the beginning. The real question is whether it can transmit from person to person in significant enough numbers to be a serious problem.

There was a scientist who did a fluid dynamics experiment on how long the virus could remain airborne, and he came up with a surprisingly long figure (I can't recall what it was) which was widely reported in the press. The CBC interviewed him and he said the news reports were blown all out of proportion, as his experiment was conducted under very unrealistic conditions. I think this is in the CBC Quirks and Quarks podcast, but I can't recall which week it appeared in.

The point of his experiment was to put an absolute upper limit on the time period for the virus surviving while airborne under ideal conditions. He said that this however was just the starting point for other scientists to find what the practical limit would be under real world conditions, which he anticipated would be far, far, less.

There is also more recent investigation which suggests that the danger of infection by transfer from surfaces may be far less than had been initially believed. The early experiments were based around how long the virus was surviving on surfaces such as door knobs. Newer investigation has focused on how the virus would get from that surface into your respiratory tract to infect you. This may lead to reductions in sanitising of surfaces in public areas, or at least to more targetting satanising of higher risk surfaces. Washing your hands is still considered to be very important though.

The absolute answers to a lot of these questions will probably only come after the disease is no longer a major problem, but for now advice on avoiding infection is still evolving as new knowledge comes in. We've only known about this disease for a few months, and the questions that really matter are often less "can the virus spread by these means under ideal conditions" and more "can the virus spread by these means to enough of an extent to keep a pandemic going".
 
There were a lot of people stating that the Far East had done so well at the beginning, which is true they we, however it is not so rosy now.

View attachment 488876
I think the "Asia" part of the graph mainly shows India and the Middle East, where it's really taking off. On the following web site India are in the top 5 in terms of new infections and new deaths, with both probably being under-counted due to limitations in their health system. It's really making quite an impact there. Pakistan and Bangladesh are also in the top dozen or so, and Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, and the rest of the Middle East are also there.
 
We've only known about this disease for a few months, and the questions that really matter are often less "can the virus spread by these means under ideal conditions" and more "can the virus spread by these means to enough of an extent to keep a pandemic going".
Indeed. I think we are largely in agreement although your comment about a few months puts things into perspective. It really seems longer than a few months. It really does.
 

Truxx

LE
Brilliant chat with son in law earlier. I did not know but he is now Mr Vaccination (seconded from the cabinet office.)

I cannot reveal too much as that would be a bit unfair, but two things came across loud and clear. Point 1is that we, the public, know virtually nothing , a situation entirely due to the media wanting to control the agenda regardless. Second the expectation driving all current planning and decision making is a severe second wave.
 
Has China finally coughed up and admitted when, how many people have died?
 
And stats being stats:

ENG 92 in 1000
EIRE 420 in 1000

:?
what is that?
According to worldometer

Cases per million - Ireland 5185 - U.K. 4256
Deaths per million - Ireland 354 - U.K. 660

we have had major issues with care homes, meat factories and healthcare workers. We are now seeing a younger people (<45) being the most common cases.
 

Le_addeur_noir

On ROPS
On ROPs
Has China finally coughed up and admitted when, how many people have died?
No. And they're still putting out fiction like they are only suffering something like 5 or less new cases on a daily basis.

IMHO, total lies.
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
what is that?
According to worldometer

Cases per million - Ireland 5185 - U.K. 4256
Deaths per million - Ireland 354 - U.K. 660

we have had major issues with care homes, meat factories and healthcare workers. We are now seeing a younger people (<45) being the most common cases.
Figures you quoted of daily infections (with a huge grin no doubt) v population. However, takes no account of density factoring. Nor does it take account of number of test done per day, all of which can be used to turn stats on their head.

And forgive me, but I'll stick up for GB all day long.
 

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