MERS Coronavirus warning

No, it looks like 17% of capacity.

View attachment 488552


"On July 9, the state reported 11,296 available staffed hospital beds, including 953 available staffed ICU beds statewide. COVID-19 patients currently occupy 16.7% of total hospital beds. In late April, Abbott ordered hospitals to reserve 15% of beds for COVID-19 patients.

According to DSHS, these numbers do not include beds at psychiatric hospitals or other psychiatric facilities. They do include psychiatric and pediatric beds at general hospitals, and pediatric beds at children’s hospitals."




Greg Abbott, Governor of Texas, Republican, and very much a Trump supporter, is obviously lying about this. You just haven't yet been able to give a reason why he would.
So... what we are seeing is a steady increase, over 4 months, of non-covid admissions, with an upturn in covid admissions in the last three weeks that did not change the actual trend of admissions. Thanks for the verification that the covid bump for the area is, indeed, statistically insignificant.

And since we are talking about hospital admissions and capacity, what ever happened to all those huge temporary hospitals in Texas that got built and never needed to be used?
 
The best way to lie is to use hand picked statistics to your personal favor.

Tell us... what is the definition of a Spanish "location?" How large are they? How many of those "locations" does Spain have? By area, does Spain have 20, 100, 500,000, or 50,000,000 "locations?"
WTF are you on about?
Locations, which I've mentioned before, are health service areas. Some large, some small.
The map below shows the areas within the Valencian Community and the amount of people they cover

1594395661196.png


Each of the 17 autonomous areas (bit like your states with its own government etc) will differ depending on the population.

Conspiracy threads are over there somewhere. (LIGAF)
 
WTF are you on about?
Locations, which I've mentioned before, are health service areas. Some large, some small.
The map below shows the areas within the Valencian Community and the amount of people they cover

View attachment 488643

Each of the 17 autonomous areas (bit like your states with its own government etc) will differ depending on the population.

Conspiracy threads are over there somewhere. (LIGAF)
Given that Spain is perhaps a little bit larger than an average of two of our states, I would hazard that their autonomous areas are a bit more like counties.

While verifying that size, I noticed a headline that kind of illuminates by question about how relevant undefined and non-specific "locations" are...
Screenshot (1501).png


73 outbreaks in Spain... for a total number of cases at a staggering 543. That's a bit less than 32 sick Spaniards PER outbreak.

Scary stuff.
 
Given that Spain is perhaps a little bit larger than an average of two of our states, I would hazard that their autonomous areas are a bit more like counties.



#
I doubt your counties have a president and a government who sets tax levels, has responsibility for education subjects, health matters and virtually all matters except defence.
I also doubt those counties have provinces (Valencia has 3) which also have their own governments and deputies (not law ones with a badge) who run the things in their area. It's not the size that matters (except to Americans, I suppose).

And while the USA may be larger in size, the Valencian Community alone has ten times more people than, for example, Wyoming. In fact, you'd have to add up the populations of Wyoming, Vermont, N and S Dakotas, Delaware and Montana to match the population of just that one region.
And, yes the over 500 new cases in a day (up from the previous week but if you'd read the reports over 80% are asymptomatic) is scary. But the fact that Florida, with a population of about half of Spain, showed 11,400 new cases in one day should scare you more. Add that to the 8,000 or so from the previous day and we are talking a bit out of control. Texas with even more than 11,500 in one day with a population again just over half that of Spain.

And New York with a death rate of 1,663 per million would be making me wonder WTF is going on.
 
WTF are you on about?
Locations, which I've mentioned before, are health service areas. Some large, some small.
The map below shows the areas within the Valencian Community and the amount of people they cover

View attachment 488643

Each of the 17 autonomous areas (bit like your states with its own government etc) will differ depending on the population.

Conspiracy threads are over there somewhere. (LIGAF)
Reporting and tracking is done by health unit where I am as well (Ontario Canada), it seems to be a pretty normal way of doing things. It's surprising that someone who claims to be an expert on pandemics had trouble understanding your post.

Local outbreaks are normal and expected. The fact that they are being found while still a fairly small size seem to indicate that the Spanish public health system seem to have a handle on the situation now that they are fully deployed and know what to look for.
 
So you think comparing three of the least populated states, and two of the smallest with Spain is appropriate?

You also think that the 30M population of Texas is little more than half of Spain's 47M.

I think 543 out of 47M is even less statistically significant than Texas' current 8300 (not 11500) out of 30M.

BTW... the NY death rate? 0.16%? What IS going on in your head to make 1,663 out of 1,000,000 sound scary?

The US national rate (all causes) is 0.86% (that would be 863.8 out of 100,000) that's, proportionately, a lot more out of a lot less (half as much out of one tenth the total).
 
Reporting and tracking is done by health unit where I am as well (Ontario Canada), it seems to be a pretty normal way of doing things. It's surprising that someone who claims to be an expert on pandemics had trouble understanding your post.

Local outbreaks are normal and expected. The fact that they are being found while still a fairly small size seem to indicate that the Spanish public health system seem to have a handle on the situation now that they are fully deployed and know what to look for.
Local outbreaks of the common cold being represented as major national crisis is apparently the new normal.
 
Screenshot (1503).png

Kaplan-Meier Survival Curve for the two most common coronavirus "colds" requiring admission to Hospital.

Screenshot (1504).png

Kaplan-Meier Survival Curve (by age) for SARS-CoV-2 (covid-19) requiring admission to Hospital.


For the under 65 group it is obvious that "covid-19" is not as bad as the regular "common cold" coronaviruses. And even at >75 with "covid-19" you are still not quite one-third fucked, roughly the same outcome as 229E for ALL AGES.
 
So you think comparing three of the least populated states, and two of the smallest with Spain is appropriate?

You also think that the 30M population of Texas is little more than half of Spain's 47M.

I think 543 out of 47M is even less statistically significant than Texas' current 8300 (not 11500) out of 30M.

BTW... the NY death rate? 0.16%? What IS going on in your head to make 1,663 out of 1,000,000 sound scary?

The US national rate (all causes) is 0.86% (that would be 863.8 out of 100,000) that's, proportionately, a lot more out of a lot less (half as much out of one tenth the total).
Why not? You started it with the size of two of your states and used two of the most populated ones.
If you could come out of your little bubble, I assume you can understand the governments of the provinces in a country to the north of you which is rather larger than you. However, it has a population some 9 million less than Spain. Or the big island of Australia which also has its own states and governance but a population a little more than half that of Spain.

As said, not all about size which seems to preoccupy the world you exist in.
But that's enough. If you really are that thick that you can't understand what I was posting and try to make a conspiracy out of it then enjoy the rest of your time.
I certainly won't try and edumicate you.
(and, yes, edumicate was a word as used by the thickoes in the Fenn St gang).
 
Why not? You started it with the size of two of your states and used two of the most populated ones.
If you could come out of your little bubble, I assume you can understand the governments of the provinces in a country to the north of you which is rather larger than you. However, it has a population some 9 million less than Spain. Or the big island of Australia which also has its own states and governance but a population a little more than half that of Spain.

As said, not all about size which seems to preoccupy the world you exist in.
But that's enough. If you really are that thick that you can't understand what I was posting and try to make a conspiracy out of it then enjoy the rest of your time.
I certainly won't try and edumicate you.
(and, yes, edumicate was a word as used by the thickoes in the Fenn St gang).
You're arguing with someone who is claiming that COVID-19 is no worse than a cold. Logic and facts aren't going to get anywhere with him.
 
You're arguing with someone who is claiming that COVID-19 is no worse than a cold. Logic and facts aren't going to get anywhere with him.
It is better to just let informative posters carry on, I think. I am not going to argue with extremes of confirmation bias. Was it Rush Limbaugh who decided Covid19 was the common cold? I will definitely listen to him.
 
And here's another summary of COVID-19 news from around the world by the CBC.
Coronavirus: What's happening around the world on Friday

COVID-19 cases increased by 228,102 on Friday, with the biggest increases being in the US, Brazil, India, and South Africa. There were also approximately 5,000 deaths.
The World Health Organization (WHO) reported a record increase in global coronavirus cases on Friday, with the total rising by 228,102 in 24 hours.

The biggest increases were in the United States, Brazil, India and South Africa, according to a daily report. The previous WHO record for new cases was 212,326 on July 4. Deaths remained steady at about 5,000 a day.
Two WHO experts went to Beijing to begin discussions on beginning a WHO-led international mission to find out how the virus jumped from animals to humans.
Two WHO experts headed to the Chinese capital on Friday to lay the groundwork for a larger mission to investigate the origins of the pandemic.

An animal health expert and an epidemiologist will meet Chinese counterparts in Beijing to set the "scope and terms of reference" for a WHO-led international mission aimed at learning how the virus jumped from animals to humans, a WHO statement said.
Current evidence is that the virus first came to the attention of science when it started spreading at the food market in Wuhan, but apparently the jump from animals to humans actually happened somewhere else. I will add that going by how long such investigations took in the case of epidemics such as Ebola, it may be years before we know just how and where this took place.
A cluster of infections late last year focused initial attention on a fresh food market in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, but the discovery of earlier cases suggests the animal-to-human jump may have happened elsewhere.
Florida have become the new epicentre of the pandemic in the US, with 11,433 new cases on Friday. Also on Friday, Walt Disney have said they intend to re-open their amusement park in that state.
Florida confirmed its place as an emerging epicentre of the pandemic in the United States on Friday by reporting its second-sharpest daily rise in cases, while Walt Disney Co. prepared to reopen its flagship theme park in Orlando to the chagrin of some employees.

Florida recorded 11,433 new coronavirus cases on Friday, the state health department said, more evidence that the virus is still spreading largely unchecked throughout parts of the country.
Meanwhile, COVID-19 continues to spread in the states of Texas, Arizona, and Mississippi. Texas recorded a new daily record of COVID-19 deaths, as well as a new high for hospitalisations for the 10th consecutive day. 16 percent of tests are coming back positive, which is unusually high as well as another record for the state. A high positivity rate often indicates that there are a lot of cases which are going undetected.
Texas is marking its deadliest week of the pandemic, reporting on Thursday a record daily death toll of more than 100, a new high for hospitalizations for the 10th consecutive day, and a nearly 16 per cent positive test rate, its highest yet.
In Arizona hospitals are at 90% of capacity, with record numbers of hospitalised, record numbers in ICU, and record numbers on ventilators.
In Arizona, hospitals were at nearly 90 per cent capacity, with a record 3,437 patients hospitalized as of Wednesday, and a record number of those, 575, on ventilators, health officials said. Earlier in the week, a record high number of 871 patients filled intensive care beds.
In Mississippi their 5 largest hospitals have no ICU beds left, and 4 more hospitals had 5% or few ICU beds left open.
Meanwhile, officials in Mississippi say the state's five largest hospitals had no ICU beds available for patients by midweek because of a surge in cases. Four more hospitals had five per cent or less of ICU beds open.
Kazakhstan are reporting an outbreak of pneumonia-like symptoms in patients who test negative for COVID-19. The WHO suspect these are actually COVID-19 patients and that there is simply a problem with Kazakhstan's testing system. However, they are looking into the situation to try to confirm this. Kazakhstan are seeing large increases in COVID-19 infections.
The WHO emergencies chief said the agency believes an unexplained pneumonia outbreak in Kazakhstan is likely due to the coronavirus.

Dr. Michael Ryan says Kazakh authorities have reported more than 10,000 lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in the last week and just under 50,000 cases and 264 deaths as of Tuesday.

"We're looking at the actual testing and the quality of testing to make sure that there haven't been false negative tests for some of those other pneumonias that are provisionally tested negative," Ryan said. He added that many pneumonia cases were likely to be COVID-19 and "just have not been diagnosed correctly."
In India, COVID-19 cases are increasing at a record rate, causing some states to re-impose lock-down measures.
India is reporting another record one-day spike in coronavirus cases, prompting some states to reimpose lockdowns in high-risk areas.

The 26,506 cases reported Friday bring India's total to 793,802. The Health Ministry also reported another 475 deaths in the past 24 hours, taking total fatalities up to 21,604.
 
SCIENCE-Y NUMBERS AGAIN...
These are the hospital survival rates for 2 of "The Common COLD" coronaviruses...
Screenshot (1503).png



And again...
The new "not the flu" coronavirus "the un-cold-eh?" for those that are admitted is
safer for under 65s, about the same for over 65s.
Screenshot (1504).png

You say you believe in science, eh? It's hard to find lots of real, hard numbers on all the other coronaviruses, as they are mostly ignored... you know... It's just a cold. But those numbers above show that Covid-19, even though it got a whole brand new classification and name to try to claim segments of a handful of different syndromes as it's own, really isn't any different from any other coronavirus, which, by definition, cause the common cold.

Just keep using "the news" and the local comedians for your facts, because science, right? Yup. Reporters and comedians are always experts on something (what would that be?).

We have a new cold virus wandering around. Yes. Coronaviruses cause the syndrome known as The Common Cold. If you get sicker from any coronavirus it becomes the syndrome known as pneumonia, and if your body screws up its response after that, it develops into ARDS.

More people are catching the new 'not-a-cold' cold, than they used to, because it didn't exist to catch it, now it does, easy to go up from 0. It is just about exactly as deadly as all the old colds before it (those science-y graphs up there prove it), but we have hundreds of years of ignoring "it's just a cold" so we certainly have to call it something else to make it scary.

Just like every other cold virus out there, "everyone" will catch it. The same small numbers of people will die from it, and, if the planet does cave in to pressure, we get a vaccine forced on us, which historically will cause more deaths from ARDS more quickly. If we don't it just becomes another cold virus circulating normally.

What about MERS? It's a coronavirus definitely more dangerous than all the rest...

Yup, and it kind of keeps limiting itself because it ACTUALLY IS more dangerous. It also migrated from Europe's animals (was it carried by humans or just shipped with livestock?). It is my opinion that MERS's granddaddy virus in Europe probably broke out a couple of times, and ended up self limiting in exactly the same way, only quicker. Anyone remember the mysterious "sweating sickness?" I am guessing it's 229E's granddaddy as well. Yeah... now that would have been a really bad cold to catch. You can even see some tiny echos in the children of immigrants from MERS country, with the new "potentially Covid-19 related mystery illness" that is showing up...

Luckily all these coronaviruses that move over to humankind tend to lose their edge due to losses during replication in our cells. A little sticky-out-bit breaks off, and eventually most of the copies out there that survive end up being "just another cold," like Covid-19's (his "real" name is SARS-CoV-2) DADDY, SARS Original-flavor. Daddy SARS was so "cold" they dropped like it's hot from tracking. That was a shorter marketing campaign that most failed Mountain Dew flavors.

Previous exposures to coronavirus tend to eventually effect the immune response in a bad way, especially vaccines which basically guarantee the bad response come quicker, and hit harder.

Fool the public once... shame on them marketers... fool you twice? Eh... they might have to change the name again, but they do it more like twice a minute, with ease.
 
Noticed two articles on the Deutsche Welle site. Apologies for providing extracts rather than summaries.
1594426777136.png

There are numerous signs that the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 not only attacks the lungs and respiratory tract, but also other organs on a massive scale.It can severely affect the heart, vessels, nerves, kidneys, and skin.

British neurologists have now published shocking details in the journal "Brain," which suggests SARS-CoV-2 can cause severe brain damage — even in patients with mild symptoms or those in recovery. Often this damage is detected very late or not at all.

Severe brain damage possible even with mild coronavirus symptoms | DW | 09.07.2020

1594427338857.png


The Chinese embassy in Kazakhstan warned its citizens on Thursday of an unidentified strain of pneumonia, after a "significant" rise in cases in June.

"The mortality rate of the disease is much higher than that of pneumonia caused by the novel coronavirus," it said on its official WeChat social media account.

The Chinese embassy described the virus as "unknown," according to the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post.

Coronavirus: Chinese report of 'more lethal' pneumonia in Kazakhstan dismissed | DW | 10.07.2020
 
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Noticed this article on the Deutsche Welle site.
View attachment 488777
There are numerous signs that the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 not only attacks the lungs and respiratory tract, but also other organs on a massive scale.It can severely affect the heart, vessels, nerves, kidneys, and skin.

British neurologists have now published shocking details in the journal "Brain," which suggests SARS-CoV-2 can cause severe brain damage — even in patients with mild symptoms or those in recovery. Often this damage is detected very late or not at all.

Severe brain damage possible even with mild coronavirus symptoms | DW | 09.07.2020
The Article said:
Scientists have never before seen another virus attack the brain in the same way COVID-19 does, points out Dr. Michael Zandi. He is a lead author of the study, as well as a consultant at UCL Hospitals.

According to the study, there were similar long lasting side effects discovered in those who recovered from the devastating Spanish flu in 1918, in which up to one million people probably suffered brain damage.
But it is definitely not "the flu."
Coronaviruses cause "the cold" (although two different influenza viruses also cause "the cold").

And it's definitely not at all like any of the other viruses (or vaccines) that cause the immune system to attack the brain (and CNS) causing encephalitis, meningitis, or encephalomyelitis. Especially not like lots of those that cause that nasty autoimmune encephalitis on "reactivation" that results in Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis that has similar symptoms to MS, like most enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis A or hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and every influenza virus, as well as all those viruses that used to (and sometimes still do) cause measles, rubella, chickenpox, and mumps. *and even Herpes (but that's a new discovery as well).

Again... more scare stories, and this time over an infinitesimal sample size.
 
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Blah Blah Blah...

Florida have become the new epicentre of the pandemic in the US, with 11,433 new cases on Friday. Also on Friday, Walt Disney have said they intend to re-open their amusement park in that state.

Meanwhile, COVID-19 continues to spread in the states of Texas, Arizona, and Mississippi. Texas recorded a new daily record of COVID-19 deaths, as well as a new high for hospitalisations for the 10th consecutive day. 16 percent of tests are coming back positive, which is unusually high as well as another record for the state. A high positivity rate often indicates that there are a lot of cases which are going undetected.

In Arizona hospitals are at 90% of capacity, with record numbers of hospitalised, record numbers in ICU, and record numbers on ventilators.

In Mississippi their 5 largest hospitals have no ICU beds left, and 4 more hospitals had 5% or few ICU beds left open.
...
Note the important bit at the end of the first paragraph about ILINet, from the CDC...
Just acknowledging the lumping of all Pneumonia, Influenza, and Coronavirus cases together for the count.
Together they are now calling them "PIC," in case you haven't heard.

Screenshot (1506).png


Now let's take a look at the ILINet heat map of activity to see the significance of these graph-y, science-y numbers by state...

Screenshot (1505).png


Yep, Florida is right up there as the new worst with a ranking of low change from last week...
The claimed continued spread into Texas, Arizona, and Mississippi show well in that darkest of green of the lowest of minimal change required to really set those records.

Yay CDC "Science-y" pictures!


Hmmmm... looks like some people are ignoring that giant crash after that "unflattened curve" they were yucking it up about a few weeks ago... long after the bump was over... thanks science-y comedians and editorialists.
 
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Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Note the important bit at the end of the first paragraph about ILINet, from the CDC...
Just acknowledging the lumping of all Pneumonia, Influenza, and Coronavirus cases together for the count.
Together they are now calling them "PIC," in case you haven't heard.

View attachment 488788

Now let's take a look at the ILINet heat map of activity to see the significance of these graph-y, science-y numbers by state...

View attachment 488789

Yep, Florida is right up there as the new worst with a ranking of low change from last week...
The claimed continued spread into Texas, Arizona, and Mississippi show well in that darkest of green of the lowest of minimal change required to really set those records.

Yay CDC "Science-y" pictures!


Hmmmm... looks like some people are ignoring that giant crash after that "unflattened curve" they were yucking it up about a few weeks ago... thanks science-y comedians and editorialists.
That report is for week ending July 4th.

It includes such gems as

"There are increases in the percentage of specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 and percentage of visits for ILI or CLI in multiple parts of the country."

"however, this past week included a holiday, which could impact both testing and reporting."

Perhaps we should wait just a minute until this week's data comes in to see what all the fuss is about with reimposing restrictions to prevent spread of infection
 

TamH70

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