MERS Coronavirus warning

TamH70

MIA
On thread (ish) does anyone have a source for prescription lens inserts for an S10 Respirator? I got a new Scott Pro 2000 filter for mine a lot cheaper than they were going for during the height of the Wuhan-Variant Coronavirus thingy, but I can't see squat through it with my crappy eyesight.

I've tried emailing Avon Rubber but they've said nowt back to me.
 
You can't look at national numbers when judging the severity of the problem since the federal government has basically abdicated leadership on the matter and the states are going in very different directions. I live in North Carolina, and the governor here has been aggressive in closing things down and slow to reopen. We have increasing numbers of COVID but there is capacity in the local hospitals and there is no major sense of panic. States such as Texas, Florida,and Arizona, however, aggressively reopened and are now dealing with a major problem that threatens to overwhelm their hospitals.

I think Europeans sometimes fail to appreciate how decentralized policy making is in our federal system. Add in the size of the country, which means different regions will be hit by the virus at different times, and it becomes clear that national numbers don't give much insight into the problem.
The national numbers are collected by various entities from every state, not the Presidents job to run the adding machine.

The increase is down to the slight relaxation of the newly imposed institutional violence, finally allowing patients to actually be seen and treated in person, but now basically testing everyone that dares to show up under the "scary conditions." So, testing and therefor confirmed cases, is increasing at a rapid rate. The fact that deaths from confirmed cases is not really rising shows the whole ordeal as the lie it is.

The syndrome is ARDS. Any patient can progress to ARDS from just about any syndrome disguised as a disease. That would be the cold, the flu, the sniffles, infection from mold, mildew, or fungi, pneumonia (from any cause) as well as just about any physical injury.

Vaccines for coronaviruses (the cold) or RSV (the sniffles) have never been safe as every one ever developed has increased the likelihood of the case progressing into ARDS after a vaccinated patient is exposed to the virus.

Until a patient infected with SARS-CoV-2 advances to Advanced Respiratory Distress Syndrome, the current syndrome they would be actually experiencing, as it IS a coronavirus, would be "the common cold."

As an addition to avoid any "experts" trying to jumble the issue... Any "excess deaths" held up as "evidence" at this point merits the proper discussion of how much of the excess is attributable to the recent implementation of the most extreme institutional violence any healthcare system has ever known. Institutional violence, if you haven't understood, would be the systemic denial of, delay of, or the imposition of obstacles to receive, care services.
 

TamH70

MIA
I think you will get a better reaction in Tesco if you upgrade. You should go more for this :)
I don't need a mask to achieve THAT look. Besides, I know my S10 fits me perfectly.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
On thread (ish) does anyone have a source for prescription lens inserts for an S10 Respirator? I got a new Scott Pro 2000 filter for mine a lot cheaper than they were going for during the height of the Wuhan-Variant Coronavirus thingy, but I can't see squat through it with my crappy eyesight.

I've tried emailing Avon Rubber but they've said nowt back to me.
Have you just asked a local opticians?
 

TamH70

MIA
Have you just asked a local opticians?
I haven't crossed the door of an opticians since the Wuhan thingy caught on as they only want to do essential work - I'm not really sure that I qualify. Besides, when I got it done through the T.A, my unit had to give me the adapter and the prescription - it wasn't something that the shop I went to, or any shop I asked at the time, had in stock, and some asshole nicked the respirator that had the inserts a few months afterwards anyway.

When I was after getting my prescription inserts for my natty Sawfly sunnies fitted with proper lenses, most optician chains I went to, including the independents, either wanted me to pay about three hundred bucks for their own brand-name tat as they wouldn't or couldn't do what I needed to be done; or they wanted me to pay them about ninety quid.

Vision Express sorted me out with the inserts, and brand new pairs of both distance and reading glasses on a new prescription for under sixty of your British Pounds. I will give them a phone and see what they can offer, or if they know someone who does.
 
The national numbers are collected by various entities from every state, not the Presidents job to run the adding machine.

The increase is down to the slight relaxation of the newly imposed institutional violence, finally allowing patients to actually be seen and treated in person, but now basically testing everyone that dares to show up under the "scary conditions." So, testing and therefor confirmed cases, is increasing at a rapid rate. The fact that deaths from confirmed cases is not really rising shows the whole ordeal as the lie it is.

The syndrome is ARDS. Any patient can progress to ARDS from just about any syndrome disguised as a disease. That would be the cold, the flu, the sniffles, infection from mold, mildew, or fungi, pneumonia (from any cause) as well as just about any physical injury.

Vaccines for coronaviruses (the cold) or RSV (the sniffles) have never been safe as every one ever developed has increased the likelihood of the case progressing into ARDS after a vaccinated patient is exposed to the virus.

Until a patient infected with SARS-CoV-2 advances to Advanced Respiratory Distress Syndrome, the current syndrome they would be actually experiencing, as it IS a coronavirus, would be "the common cold."

As an addition to avoid any "experts" trying to jumble the issue... Any "excess deaths" held up as "evidence" at this point merits the proper discussion of how much of the excess is attributable to the recent implementation of the most extreme institutional violence any healthcare system has ever known. Institutional violence, if you haven't understood, would be the systemic denial of, delay of, or the imposition of obstacles to receive, care services.
1594200169191.png

The graph is for Texas, and shows the 7-day average deaths doubling from 20 to 40 in the last month, so yeah, not "really rising" at all. :rolleyes:
 
The current situation in Switzerland, courtesy of Swissinfo.ch:

“After imposing unprecedented restrictions on public life to contain the pandemic, Switzerland eased its measures and re-opened its land borders. But since mid-June there has been a worrying rise in new cases. Here is where things stand and the latest on the measures still in place.

July 5, 2020 - 15:38
See in other languages: 9
From July 6, passengers on Swiss public transport have to wear face masks after an increase in the number of new cases and demands from cantons.
Also from July 6, anyone entering Switzerland from any of the 29 "high risk" countries, which include the US, has to undergo a ten-day quarantine.
The Covid-19 tracing app SwissCovid has crossed the one million downloads threshold.
Since June 22, public and private events of up to 1,000 people have been permitted on condition that contact tracing is guaranteed. Larger events are still banned.The recommended safe distance between people was reduced from two metres to 1.5 metres.
Tests are now free for residents; the SwissCovid contact tracing app became available on June 25; as of June 30, about 920,000 people had downloaded it.
Travel is now possible between Switzerland and the European Union, EFTA countries and the United Kingdom. It is likely to be expanded to a further 18 "safe" countries from July 20.

Over 32,000 people have tested positive to the virus and almost 2,000 have died in Switzerland, which has a population of 8.5 million. Cantons Ticino, Vaud, Geneva and Valais have been the hardest-hit parts of the country - they were hotspots early in the pandemic.

The lockdown and strict restrictions had a dramatic impact, flattening the curve and allowing the authorities to ease measures step by step. From its March peak, the number of new cases fell to around a dozen in early June, alongside a drop in hospital cases and deaths.

But since mid-June the number of new cases has begun to slowly creep up in different parts of the country. For example, two schools were closed in cantons Vaud and Jura after teachers were tested positive. And hundreds of people were quarantined in Zurich and Olten after attending nightclubs visited by a number of individuals who were infected.

Federal health office director Pascal Strupler has described the recent increase as "disturbing". He urges people to maintain social distancing and good hygiene despite the easing of lockdown measures.

Since the easing of the lockdown, public transport has returned to the standard timetable. However, the number of passengers remains below normal.

On July 1, the government announced that from July 6 passengers on Swiss public transport will have to wear face masks. The mask requirement applies to everyone aged 12 or older. It applies in trains, trams and buses, mountain railways, cable cars and on ships. The Swiss Federal Railways said conductors will ask anyone not wearing a mask to leave the train and anyone refusing will be fined.

With thousands of tests being carried out per day, Switzerland has one of the highest per-capita rates of testing in the world. The government adopted an extended testing strategy along with a contact-tracing concept as it moved to ease social distancing measures.

From June 25, Swiss residents have also been able to download the SwissCovid smartphone app, a contact-tracing system.

While officials were initially sceptical of the benefits of face masks, the armed forces said later that they would be buying up to 100 million masks, which are to be sold to retailers at purchasing price, to address shortages. The government has a budget of up to CHF400 million ($412 million) to provide different types of masks. It remains the responsibility of hospitals, companies and private households to ensure own stocks.

The government has ended its recommendation that people work from home wherever possible. It will be up to employers to decide and put the necessary safety measures in place. “

To add to that, wef today (8 July), in the Canton de Vaud, the wearing of masks/face protection is obligatory in all establishments to which the public have access, eg shops.
Our local Coop, for instance, sells them at the entrance for CHF 1.00, good for 6h wear total.
 

AfricaExpat

Old-Salt
The graph is for Texas, and shows the 7-day average deaths doubling from 20 to 40
I understand the population of Texas is 29 million. I couldn't agree more that there is an increase from 20 to 40 but at present it is not making much of a dent on the country figures as a whole.

Texas probably will go far higher in deaths. Perhaps for a short period to 500 per day if it was to catch it in line with parts of Europe. When it comes down to it though it is not worth destroying your whole economy to try to stop the virus in it's tracks. Mitigation to protect the health cover is good but breaking your country is bad.
 
I understand the population of Texas is 29 million. I couldn't agree more that there is an increase from 20 to 40 but at present it is not making much of a dent on the country figures as a whole.

Texas probably will go far higher in deaths. Perhaps for a short period to 500 per day if it was to catch it in line with parts of Europe. When it comes down to it though it is not worth destroying your whole economy to try to stop the virus in it's tracks. Mitigation to protect the health cover is good but breaking your country is bad.
That's a different message from "it's all a lie", though.

You can correlate that graph with the Governor's decisions about shutting down initially and then reopening too early.
 

AfricaExpat

Old-Salt
I should think that the more accurate error is that the shut down was actually started too early in Texas. You can only hold the population for a couple of months and this period was used when there were hardly any cases already in the state.

This is another facet of the previously mentioned point that you can't treat a huge country as a single entity. I never said any publicised figures were lies but instead pointed out that everything needs to be kept in perspective.
 
Last edited:
I should think that the more accurate error is that the shut down was actually started too early in Texas. You can only hold the population for a couple of months and this period was used when there were hardly any cases already in the state.

This is another facet of the previously mentioned point that you can't treat a huge country as a signle entity. I never said any publicised figures were lies but instead pointed out that everything needs to be kept in perspective.
You may not have, but the poster I replied to did. It is in bold in the quote.

The Governor's orders on the initial shutdown were issued on the 7th March.
The first re-opening orders were issued on the 17th April, phased through into May.

Not exactly a protracted shutdown, and they're paying for the premature opening in lives and permanent health issues.
 
The following is a story on how the public in Canada perceive COVID-19.
Canadians' COVID-19 fears are rising again — and the U.S. might be to blame

Daily infections are down to a few hundred new cases per day. However, fear of becoming infected has been rising.

58% of Canadians are personally afraid of getting COVID-19. That figure has increased by 7 points in the past two weeks and is now at the highest point since the survey began collecting data in mid April. This is despite the numbers of daily infections having falling significantly.
The survey, conducted by Léger for the Association for Canadian Studies between July 3 and 5, found that 58 per cent of respondents were personally afraid of contracting COVID-19. That figure has increased seven percentage points in two weeks and is now the highest it has been in Léger's weekly polling since mid-April.

It's a notable shift in public opinion. Concern peaked in early April, when 64 per cent of Canadians reported being personally afraid of getting sick. At the time, Canada was reporting over 1,200 new cases every day.

COVIDfear1.png


The reason for this rising concern in Canada seems to be due to the rising rate of infection south of the border and the apparent inability of the US government to handle the problem there effectively.
While Canada's COVID-19 trend line has been improving, the outbreak in the United States is getting worse.

At the low point in Léger's polling on Canadians' fears of contracting the disease, there were about 20,000 new cases being reported every day in the United States — fewer than during the peak point for Canadians' COVID anxiety, when American health officials were reporting between 25,000 and 35,000 new cases daily.

But over the three days when Léger was last in the field, the U.S. hit new records for COVID-19, peaking at 57,000 new cases on July 3 alone. The caseload in most states is now rising.
As a result of this, the overwhelming majority of Canadians, 81%, want the border with the US to remain closed for the foreseeable future. Only a very small percentage, 3%, think it should be re-opened now.
A strong majority of Canadians think the Canada-US border should stay closed for the foreseeable future (81%), while 14 per cent think it should be opened now only in areas where infection rates are low, and three per cent think it should be opened immediately. Two per cent are unsure. There is strong support for the border remaining closed across regions, and age groups.
Another poll found that 86% of Canadians reject the idea of opening the border at the end of July. 71% "strongly reject" this idea, which suggests that opinions are pretty firm on that. There is no plan to re-open the border at this time, but the legislation under which the closure occurs requires monthly renewals.
Léger finds that 86 per cent of Canadians reject the idea of re-opening the border at the end of July, as is currently planned (although the border closures have been renewed and extended repeatedly in the past). Remarkably, 71 per cent of Canadians "strongly disagreed" with a re-opening of the border, suggesting a firmly held opinion.
In mid-May, the same poll said that 21% of Canadians wanted the border re-opened by the end of June. Support for opening it by the end of July has now fallen to 11%, showing how attitudes are hardening against the idea.
In mid-May, Léger reported that 21 per cent of Canadians wanted the border to open by the end of June or earlier. Now, just 11 per cent agree with opening the border by the end of July.
82% of Canadians now expect there to be a second wave to the pandemic. This is up by 6 points from a month ago.
Canadians are reporting more pessimism about the future, despite the apparently improving situation here. According to the Léger poll, 82 per cent of Canadians expect a second wave — that's up six points from early June.
8% want an increased the pace for relaxing general social distancing restrictions, down 5 points from last month. 28% want the pace slowed down, an increase of 7 points. 65% think the pace is about right.
Just eight per cent of respondents want to see governments accelerate the pace of relaxing physical distancing and self-isolation measures, down five points since last month. The number who want to slow down the pace has increased by seven points to 28 per cent. The other 65 per cent want to maintain the current pace of re-opening.
In mid-June, 42% thought the worst was behind us. That has now fallen to 35%. The number who think the worst is yet to come is now at 39%, an increase of 9 points, the highest level since the middle of April.
The poll suggests Canadians have lost some of their late-spring optimism. The number who reported thinking that the worst is behind us peaked at 42 per cent in mid-June. That has dropped by seven points to 35 per cent, while the number who think the worst is yet to come has increased nine points to 39 per cent — its highest level since the middle of April, when the first wave of the novel coronavirus was cresting in Canada.
 
Here's another poll in Canada, this one about attitudes towards masks in Canada.
There are regulations regarding where and under what circumstances masks must be worn, but they vary from province to province, and even from health unit to health unit, depending on local conditions. This poll is simply addressing the public's attitudes toward masks, without regards to what existing regulations may be.

62% of Canadians would support mandatory mask laws, 24% would go along with it, and only 14% would be against them. I should point out that the 14% figure does not imply these people would refuse to comply, simply that they wouldn't like it. The 24% "I don't like it but I'm not going to make a fuss over it" is a very Canadian sort of attitude towards many things.
If governments decide to make mask-wearing mandatory, there would be little opposition, however. Only 14% would oppose such a move, while 62% would support it and another 24% would go along with it.
There are some differences along party lines with regards to mask laws with 24% of Conservatives being against the idea, as compared to 9% of Liberals and 5% of NDP. However, be very wary of reading too much into these numbers without understanding how those opinions may vary on a regional basis, as COVID-19 cases have been very concentrated in a few areas, while other areas have seen very few cases. As a result, social restrictions are tailored to local circumstances and what is appropriate for one place may not be for another.
Across party lines, only 24% of Conservatives, 9% of Liberals and 5% of New Democrats would be against such laws/regulations.
Here's a break down by province or region. The Atlantic provinces are not shown separately. Note that in BC and Alberta, despite being governed by parties at the opposite end of the political spectrum (NPD in BC, and Conservative in Alberta), attitudes towards masks are virtually identical. Quebec is little different from BC or Alberta.

The outliers are Saskatchewan / Manitoba with less support, on Ontario with the most support. All three are run by some sort of conservative party (as are Quebec by the way).



I would explain the differences as being mainly related to regional conditions rather than politics. Manitoba and Saskatchewan have had fairly low infection rates, while Ontario has the second highest number, after Quebec. To put this in perspective, Ontario has reported a total of 37,798 cases since the start of the pandemic, while Manitoba for example have reported only 325. That will undoubtedly colour local perceptions of the problem.

This also shows up in regional results when asking people if they wear a mask now. Take these numbers with a very large grain of salt as they rely on people being both truthful and also having a good memory of what proportion of time they did in fact wear a mask. Also, different types of "public places" are open in different provinces, and the higher risk ones where it is difficult to maintain social distance are in most cases still closed.


Grocery stores are enforcing a 2m social distance rule and the number of people allowed in, and as a result in many or most places masks are not required. Other establishments will have other limitations as well as limits on entry, with some handing you a mask before you can enter. Many places like restaurants have outdoor tables, with cities allowing them to take over side walks and even parts of streets as patios. Other places are still closed. You really have to know the local conditions in order to understand what these numbers mean and how people may understand the question differently from how you do.

Here's the same question broken down by age. This age distribution bears little or no resemblance to what I actually see, which is the middle aged and older being much more likely to wear a mask than the 18-29 group.

I think reinforces the point of taking answers to questions about "do you wear a mask" with a very large grain of salt.

Questions about "would you support laws requiring people to wear a mask" however are much more likely to be answered correctly, as people are more able to judge their opinion than they are able to report correctly on what they actually do in a question that is open to broad interpretation.

I should point out that there are already laws and regulations regarding wearing of masks, but they are tailored to local conditions rather than having a national one size fits all law.
 
This story is a general round up of COVID-19 news from around the world. I'll attempt to summarise the most important bits.
Coronavirus: What's happening around the world on Wednesday

In the US, Trump has threatened to withhold money from states which don't re-open their schools on time this autumn. Trump is complaining that Germany, Denmark, and Norway are re-opening their schools "with no problems". The fact that these countries seem to have their COVID-19 situation under control while the US do not appears to have gone over his head.
As cases of COVID-19 continue to rise in a number of states, U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to withhold federal money if schools don't reopen in the fall, and he lashed out at federal health officials over school reopening guidelines that he says are impractical and expensive.

Taking to Twitter to voice his frustration, Trump argued that countries including Germany, Denmark and Norway have reopened schools "with no problems." He also repeated his claim that Democrats want to keep schools closed for political reasons, not because of any risks associated with the novel coronavirus.

"The Dems think it would be bad for them politically if U.S. schools open before the November election," Trump tweeted, "but is important for the children & families. May cut off funding if not open!"
Infection rates are increasing in many states across the US. The percentage of positive tests as a total of tests done indicates that this isn't just an artefact of more testing.
Authorities have reported alarming upswings of daily caseloads in roughly two-dozen states over the past two weeks, a sign that efforts to control transmission of the novel coronavirus have failed in large swaths of the country.

Hawaii, Missouri, Montana and Oklahoma on Tuesday also shattered their previous daily record highs for new cases. About 24 states have also reported disturbingly high infection rates as a percentage of diagnostic tests conducted over the past week.
The number of hospitalisations has doubled in Texas in the past two weeks.
In Texas alone, the number of hospitalized patients more than doubled in just two weeks.
In Florida, 25 out of 67 counties have reported that their ICUs have reached full capacity.
In Florida, more than four-dozen hospitals across 25 of 67 counties reported their intensive care units had reached full capacity, according to the state's Agency for Health Care Administration.
In Brazil, president Bolsonaro says he is confident he will achieve a full recovery from COVID-19. He made a show of taking hydroxychloroquine for the disease, a treatment which has been generally discredited by medical studies.
In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro said he is confident he will swiftly recover from the novel coronavirus thanks to treatment with hydroxychloroquine, the anti-malaria drug that has not been proven effective against the virus. (...)

The right-wing populist posted a video to Facebook of him taking his third dose of hydroxychloroquine, which has also been promoted by U.S. President Donald Trump.

"Today I'm a lot better, so certainly it's working," Bolsonaro said, downing the dose with a glass of water.
Africa have now reported more than half a million COVID-19 cases. The true numbers are undoubtedly far higher, as there is a serious shortage of testing ability in Africa.
Africa now has more than a half-million confirmed coronavirus cases. The continent-wide total is over 508,000, according to figures released Wednesday by the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The true number of cases among Africa's 1.3 billion people is unknown as its 54 countries continue to face a serious shortage of testing materials for the virus.

"A tremendous problem. A real crisis of access," the World Health Organization's Africa chief, Matshidiso Moeti, said last week.
COVID-19 has already killed more people in Africa than Ebola did during its biggest outbreak in 2014 to 2016.
Already COVID-19 has killed more people in Africa — 11,955 — than Ebola did in its deadliest outbreak from 2014 to 2016 in West Africa, the WHO said Wednesday.
In Iran, infections have reached 248,379, and deaths have exceeded 12,000. I would take these numbers as a lower limit rather than an accurate appraisal, given the likely limits of Iran's health system and ability of the poor to access it.
In Iran, the death toll from COVID-19 passed 12,000 on Wednesday, health ministry spokesperson Sima Sadat Lari said in a statement on state TV. The total number of infections in the country has reached 248,379, she said.
In Belgrade, protesters fought with police after the government announced that a COVID-19 lockdown will be re-imposed.
In the Serbian capital of Belgrade on Tuesday, thousands of protesters fought running battles with police and tried to storm the parliament building after the president announced that a coronavirus lockdown will be reintroduced.

Police fired several rounds of tear gas at the protesters, some chanting "Resignation! Resignation!" as they gathered in front of the downtown parliament building. Some of the protesters briefly managed to enter parliament by force, but were pushed back by riot police.
In Australia, the government said they may slow down repatriation flights which are still returning Australians from abroad. This follows a recent spike in infections in Melbourne.
In Australia, Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Wednesday said the country should slow down the return of its citizens from abroad, as Melbourne, the capital of Victoria, and surrounding regions began another partial lockdown to slow the spread of the virus.

The border between the states of Victoria and New South Wales, the busiest in the country, was closed overnight.

Morrison said he would take a proposal on reducing the number of repatriation flights to a national cabinet of state and territory leaders on Friday.
 
View attachment 488057
The graph is for Texas, and shows the 7-day average deaths doubling from 20 to 40 in the last month, so yeah, not "really rising" at all. :rolleyes:

40 cases/30000000 Texans = 0.0000013, not exactly a statistically significant variance. It is also barely a statistically relevant number with respect to the 50,000 tests a day (also 7 day averaged) with a positivity rate of 15.03%, and with a grand total (as of today) of 220,564 confirmed cases, the total 2,183 attributed deaths works out to a death rate of 1.2% for Texas for "confirmed" cases. But there are still a million or more Texans with SARS-CoV-2 infections that will never be tested which really lowers the actual death rate even more.

Of course, no one has died from any coronavirus, not even SARS-CoV-2.
However, a little more than 500,000 across the entire planet are counted to have died with SARS-CoV-2.
These counts are inaccurate, some may not have been counted, and some counted are not infected. Call it a wash.

People have died from ARDS. This syndrome of the lungs being overwhelmed by the body's own immune response is what all of them, and several million more that were not infected with SARS-CoV-2 die from every year.

ARDS is a sydrome. Pneumonia is a syndrome. The flu is a syndrome. The common cold is a syndrome. All syndromes are classified as such by their common symptoms but multiple causes.

The common cold is caused by coronaviruses, 2 different influenza viruses, and a handful of other viruses.

The flu is caused by influenza viruses, except the 2 that got lumped into the common cold.

The sniffles is caused by RSV, and anything else until symptoms or testing differentiates it as some other thing.

Pneumonia is caused by everything.

SARS was a renaming of ARDS to try to specifically attach it as a disease (not a syndrome) to a new (novel) coronavirus. That flopped, so it is no longer tracked, it is also no longer new.

They didn't bother calling the new new SARS-CoC-2 as SARS 2 because SARS is no longer scary. So, new name, but we will go on trying to stretch the list of symptoms for the progression of three different syndromes across the face of the new virus.

If someone is infected with the "new" coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, they are said to have the "new" made up "disease" Covid-19, which is the spliced together composite of three (or more) different syndromes.

What they really have is a coronavirus infection, and their very first symptoms will likely be those of the syndrome known as "the common cold," because that is what coronaviruses do.

If their body isn't successful in fighting it off early with it's 'first string players,' then the patient will progress into the next syndrome known as "pneumonia" where the infection has spread into the lungs, and the body is trying to organize 'special teams' with new ways to kill it off. The new immune system responses will normally be successful at this point.

However, sometimes immune system responses go awry. With coronaviruses this seems to happen after multiple exposures, especially if the previous exposure was from an attempted vaccine which would not have all the same elements of the actual virus. This would be the unfortunate progression to a third syndrome known as ARDS.

Advanced Respiratory Distress Syndrome. You've got an ~80% chance of dying from this syndrome.
Remember it is your body's inappropriate response to whatever (infection or even injury) that is destroying your lungs. Also remember it has that ~80% chance of killing you because you are definitely not getting proper treatment while on that ventilator. There will be no one properly qualified monitoring your blood gas exchange, much less completely familiar with the intricacies, to make subtle changes in your therapy that you will need to survive, or sit there checking those numbers closely for the recommended 4-6 hours after every event/change. The most you will have is a nurse who is "familiar" with vents (she can turn the alarm off, and call RT). That nurse will likely take 20 minutes to mask and gown up to go into your room to check on you once an hour (or maybe once a shift), and shift you a bit to try to prevent bed sores. Not exactly what you need.

All of these patients that end up dying may die with SARS-CoV-2, but quite a few of them are actually dying from the malfunction of their own immune system and incompetent, improper, and incomplete treatment of their ARDS. Every coronavirus vaccine (and RSV vaccine) attempted has historically proven to increase the chances of a patient's rapid advancement to ARDS by ******* up the immune response.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
40 cases/30000000 Texans = 0.0000013, not exactly a statistically significant variance. It is also barely a statistically relevant number with respect to the 50,000 tests a day (also 7 day averaged) with a positivity rate of 15.03%, and with a grand total (as of today) of 220,564 confirmed cases, the total 2,183 attributed deaths works out to a death rate of 1.2% for Texas for "confirmed" cases. But there are still a million or more Texans with SARS-CoV-2 infections that will never be tested which really lowers the actual death rate even more.

Of course, no one has died from any coronavirus, not even SARS-CoV-2.
However, a little more than 500,000 across the entire planet are counted to have died with SARS-CoV-2.
These counts are inaccurate, some may not have been counted, and some counted are not infected. Call it a wash.

People have died from ARDS. This syndrome of the lungs being overwhelmed by the body's own immune response is what all of them, and several million more that were not infected with SARS-CoV-2 die from every year.

ARDS is a sydrome. Pneumonia is a syndrome. The flu is a syndrome. The common cold is a syndrome. All syndromes are classified as such by their common symptoms but multiple causes.

The common cold is caused by coronaviruses, 2 different influenza viruses, and a handful of other viruses.

The flu is caused by influenza viruses, except the 2 that got lumped into the common cold.

The sniffles is caused by RSV, and anything else until symptoms or testing differentiates it as some other thing.

Pneumonia is caused by everything.

SARS was a renaming of ARDS to try to specifically attach it as a disease (not a syndrome) to a new (novel) coronavirus. That flopped, so it is no longer tracked, it is also no longer new.

They didn't bother calling the new new SARS-CoC-2 as SARS 2 because SARS is no longer scary. So, new name, but we will go on trying to stretch the list of symptoms for the progression of three different syndromes across the face of the new virus.

If someone is infected with the "new" coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, they are said to have the "new" made up "disease" Covid-19, which is the spliced together composite of three (or more) different syndromes.

What they really have is a coronavirus infection, and their very first symptoms will likely be those of the syndrome known as "the common cold," because that is what coronaviruses do.

If their body isn't successful in fighting it off early with it's 'first string players,' then the patient will progress into the next syndrome known as "pneumonia" where the infection has spread into the lungs, and the body is trying to organize 'special teams' with new ways to kill it off. The new immune system responses will normally be successful at this point.

However, sometimes immune system responses go awry. With coronaviruses this seems to happen after multiple exposures, especially if the previous exposure was from an attempted vaccine which would not have all the same elements of the actual virus. This would be the unfortunate progression to a third syndrome known as ARDS.

Advanced Respiratory Distress Syndrome. You've got an ~80% chance of dying from this syndrome.
Remember it is your body's inappropriate response to whatever (infection or even injury) that is destroying your lungs. Also remember it has that ~80% chance of killing you because you are definitely not getting proper treatment while on that ventilator. There will be no one properly qualified monitoring your blood gas exchange, much less completely familiar with the intricacies, to make subtle changes in your therapy that you will need to survive, or sit there checking those numbers closely for the recommended 4-6 hours after every event/change. The most you will have is a nurse who is "familiar" with vents (she can turn the alarm off, and call RT). That nurse will likely take 20 minutes to mask and gown up to go into your room to check on you once an hour (or maybe once a shift), and shift you a bit to try to prevent bed sores. Not exactly what you need.

All of these patients that end up dying may die with SARS-CoV-2, but quite a few of them are actually dying from the malfunction of their own immune system and incompetent, improper, and incomplete treatment of their ARDS. Every coronavirus vaccine (and RSV vaccine) attempted has historically proven to increase the chances of a patient's rapid advancement to ARDS by ******* up the immune response.
A bit like saying nobody has ever died from HIV?

Am not sure where you are getting your 20minutes to mask and gown up from. Nothing like that at all.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
A bit like saying nobody has ever died from HIV?

Am not sure where you are getting your 20minutes to mask and gown up from. Nothing like that at all.
Not exactly. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus actually shuts down the immune system leading to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, which allows all sorts of opportunistic infections to kill you. ARDS, where the immune system actually does the killing, can be propagated by literally anything, including the common cold, which no one bothers to track. Hundreds of years of "it's just a cold" (which progresses to pneumonia then recorded as a pneumonia death, when it was really an ARDS death) make the contortions going into hyping the newest pandemic seem a bit much.

True 20 minutes is an exaggeration, surely I am allowed one that doesn't make any difference, especially compared to all the exaggeration, misdirection, and outright lies on the other side of the argument. No matter how quickly those nurses gown up, they aren't going in more than they have to, and they will not stay any longer than they have to.

Actually being in a Covid-19 isolation ward, I wasn't bothered by the nurses much at all. With the thermostat set at it's coldest setting, every hero that visited complained of it being hot in the full suit, and made their way out as quickly as they could. I should note that in February, I was admitted for heart attack symptoms, and left with diagnosis of RBBB and LQTS. During my later admission for "Covid-19," episodes of VT and even a weird, thankfully transient, VFib (which lasted about 4 minutes) were basically ignored.

Luckily, or perhaps unluckily, I keep proving to be hard to kill.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top