MERS Coronavirus warning

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Highly inaccurate though; Oslo is not an ******** of a place.
I was unfortunate enough to be stranded in Oslo in 1981 for 3 days owing to an avalanche blocking the railway line to Voss. Absolutely awful situation, but I made the most of it.
 
Has any one read the report on CV19 and BAME deaths ?
Most of the findings have been in the public domain for weeks, but there are a few interesting bits if you hunt around.
Personally I think it was a statistics gathering exercise and does not have a clue of how to deal with the problem.
It raises a lot of questions, but gives no answers.
 
Has any one read the report on CV19 and BAME deaths ?
Most of the findings have been in the public domain for weeks, but there are a few interesting bits if you hunt around.
Personally I think it was a statistics gathering exercise and does not have a clue of how to deal with the problem.
It raises a lot of questions, but gives no answers.
The clue is in the very first sentence of the document.
"This is a descriptive review of data on disparities in the risk and outcomes from COVID19."
 
The clue is in the very first sentence of the document.
"This is a descriptive review of data on disparities in the risk and outcomes from COVID19."
Unfortunately its not what people were asking for. There is a bit of medical research out there that may provide some answers.
 

Dr Death

Old-Salt
This person should get tea & medals for this tasking.
Pathetic the queues to get in the other days, told Croydon was gridlocked by the opening!
1591174590947.png
 
This person should get tea & medals for this tasking.
Pathetic the queues to get in the other days, told Croydon was gridlocked by the opening!
View attachment 478989
It's the way they try and herd you through the store, betrays their Nazi sympathiser origins
 
Unfortunately its not what people were asking for. There is a bit of medical research out there that may provide some answers.
Nevertheless, your complaint that it seemed to be a purely statistical analysis rather than providing a solution was at odds with the fact that it never claimed to be anything else other than a purely statistical analysis.

Before the answers can be provided, the scope and scale of the problem has to be understood. Until this report, there was a lot of anecdote but not much data. One thing that seems to me to be guaranteed to fail, is policy based on anecdote.

My complaint would be that this report doesn't go far enough in its analysis. I think the stats need to be drilled down into a more detailed level to gain a better understanding of how the different co-factors interact. Then we need some actual medical science to try and understand why some individuals are more susceptible than others based on something a bit more rigorous than skin-tone or ethnicity.
 
Has anyone else picked up on the comments by a BBC interviewee this morning on NHS treatment for BAME patients? Either here or in other media?
 
Nevertheless, your complaint that it seemed to be a purely statistical analysis rather than providing a solution was at odds with the fact that it never claimed to be anything else other than a purely statistical analysis.

Before the answers can be provided, the scope and scale of the problem has to be understood. Until this report, there was a lot of anecdote but not much data. One thing that seems to me to be guaranteed to fail, is policy based on anecdote.

My complaint would be that this report doesn't go far enough in its analysis. I think the stats need to be drilled down into a more detailed level to gain a better understanding of how the different co-factors interact. Then we need some actual medical science to try and understand why some individuals are more susceptible than others based on something a bit more rigorous than skin-tone or ethnicity.
Your starter for 10

What are the health effects of vitamin D deficiency?
Getting enough vitamin D may also play a role in helping to keep you healthy by protecting against the following conditions and possibly helping to treat them. These conditions can include:

The first 3 sound a bit like underlying heath issues associated with a poor outcome with CV19.
 
Has any one read the report on CV19 and BAME deaths ?
Most of the findings have been in the public domain for weeks, but there are a few interesting bits if you hunt around.
Personally I think it was a statistics gathering exercise and does not have a clue of how to deal with the problem.
It raises a lot of questions, but gives no answers.
A major factor in this appears to be related to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, the latter two also commonly associated with the first. If I understand the analysis correctly, they are saying that these health conditions tend to be more common amongst particular ethnic groups and also disproportionately appear as health conditions on COVID-19 death certificates.
Among deaths with COVID-19 mentioned on the death certificate, a higher percentage mentioned diabetes, hypertensive diseases, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and dementia than all cause death certificates.

Diabetes was mentioned on 21% of death certificates where COVID-19 was also mentioned. This finding is consistent with other studies that have reported a higher risk of death from COVID-19 among patients with diabetes. This proportion was higher in all BAME groups when compared to White ethnic groups and was 43% in the Asian group and 45% in the Black group. The same disparities were seen for hypertensive disease.

Several studies, although measuring the different outcomes from COVID-19, report an increased risk of adverse outcomes in obese or morbidly obese people.
There are also factors relating to living in large cities and occupation. With regards to living in large cities, the chances of exposure to the virus are greater because you tend to come into close contact with more people there than in smaller towns or rural areas. With regards to occupation, certain ethnic groups are quite prevalent in nursing, other hospital workers, and other occupations where they come into contact with a lot of people, many of them possibly ill.

It's a very useful study, as the associated health conditions it may offer some clues as to why the disease affects some people more than others, and the regional and occupational factors can help guide where risks are which require greater social distancing measures.
 
My complaint would be that this report doesn't go far enough in its analysis. I think the stats need to be drilled down into a more detailed level to gain a better understanding of how the different co-factors interact. Then we need some actual medical science to try and understand why some individuals are more susceptible than others based on something a bit more rigorous than skin-tone or ethnicity.
[/QUOTE]
I am sorry that was exactly what I was saying, presumably, very poorly.
 
The Swedish epidemiologist who was behind his country's strategy to avoid the sort of formal lockdown used in the rest of Europe now says that Sweden's policy was a mistake and they should have down more to contain the infection.
Sweden should have done more to combat coronavirus, health chief says
Sweden should have done more to combat the coronavirus, the epidemiologist behind a national strategy that avoided the strict lockdowns seen in many other countries said on Wednesday.

Anders Tegnell's comments followed mounting criticism of the government's handling of the crisis and a policy that has relied largely on voluntary action, social distancing and common-sense hygiene advice but has failed to prevent the virus spreading.
He said that if they were to do things all over again, he would have wanted Sweden to have introduced more social distancing measures.
"Yes, I think we could have done better in what we did in Sweden, clearly," Tegnell, the chief epidemiologist at the Public Health Agency, told Swedish radio.

"If we were to run into the same disease, knowing exactly what we know about it today, I think we would end up doing something in between what Sweden did and what the rest of the world has done," he said.
A professor of infectious medicine at Uppsala University commenting on the policy that Sweden did adopt called it "catastrophic" and a national embarrassment for Sweden.
Bjorn Olsen, professor of infectious medicine at Uppsala University, said Sweden's strategy had been catastrophic.

"This is one of Sweden's biggest embarrassments and most tragic events, (in) all categories," he said, calling for a change of course to start testing and do more contact tracing. "As long as people are dying, we must try to change."
 
Dr Sharma from the BMA ?
I don't think so. I get the impression that the two women were both protestors. One said something about the NHS treatment of BAME people not being adequate and at that moment it went unquestioned by the presenter. Some one must have emailed or twittered a comment which the presenter then read out saying that the NHS treatment was good. I have had a look to see if there is a clip but I can't see one.

The way she said it seemed to suggest that it was accepted as fact in some circles but there was no reference to any research and the presenter failed to get them to expand on it.
 

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