MERS Coronavirus warning

One needs to be a bit careful when comparing percentages vaccinated. The UK Government tends to only publish % of the adult population rather than % of total population. The official figures released today are 88.4% received first vaccination and 71.8% both, but that is of the adult population.
It's been mentioned before on this thread that it can be hard to interpret vaccination numbers if you don't know what they're based on. I see a fair number of reports on the CBC which mention both sets of numbers.

When you are looking at international comparisons then it gets more confusing. In Canadian terms put what you called "adult population" is referred to as "eligible population", because it includes people who are not adults, as we are vaccinating people down to age 12. In other countries the lower age limit might be 18, 16, 15, or 12.

Some countries interpret the lower age limit as being with respect to what age you are right now, while others interpret it as being what age you will be by the end of the year. So for example, earlier this year we were vaccinating people down to age 18, but "18" also meant people who were 17 but would be 18 by the end of this calendar year.

You also have to take into account the fact that countries which have a younger population will have a larger proportion of them who fall below the lower age limit, whatever that may be.

What it means is that if you are doing international comparisons of vaccination coverage then you really can only look at percentage of total population. However, that number will incorporate policy decisions as to age group to vaccinate as well as how well organised the vaccination program is, what their vaccine supply situation is, and how well the population are accepting vaccination.
 
Here is the COVID-19 summary for Friday.
Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Friday

A study in the US has said that vaccinated people are as likely to transmit the virus to others as unvaccinated people. This suggests that current US practice of discarding masks was premature. This by the way is a separate issue from whether or not someone gets sick from infection, vaccination has been shown to be very effective against that, even with the delta variant. This was based on a study on an outbreak in the town of Provincetown in the state of Massachusetts. The town is in a tourist area and people had been packing the bars and restaurants as if the pandemic were over.
The findings have the potential to upend past thinking about how the disease is spread. Previously, vaccinated people who got infected were thought to have low levels of virus and to be unlikely to pass it to others. But the new data shows that is not the case with the delta variant.


However, a virologist at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada has said the method used by the study was wrong, and the amount of virus in an infected person is not a good measure of whether they are transmitting it to other people.
In the report, the measure researchers used to assess how much virus an infected person is carrying does not indicate whether they are actually transmitting the virus to other people, said Dr. Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at the University of Saskatchewan.

I suspect this study will be the subject of a fair bit of debate in future with respect to whether masks are still needed. Vaccines have shown themselves to be very effective in protecting the vaccinated person against serious illness or death. The issue is to what extent they provide a significant degree of "herd immunity" to protect people who were not vaccinated. If anything, it provides yet more reason to get vaccinated if you have not already done so.


Japan are expanding the state of emergency to more areas as the pandemic there grows in scale.
In Asia, Japan on Friday expanded a coronavirus state of emergency to four more areas in addition to Tokyo following record spikes in infections as the capital hosts the Olympics.

France are deploying military medics and ICU units to islands in the French Caribbean, and some patients are being brought to France for treatment. Hospitals in the area are apparently filling up.
In the Americas, France is deploying military medics and ICU units to the French Caribbean to relieve hospitals facing a coronavirus surge. Military planes are also bringing some critically ill patients to the French mainland for treatment.

Ivory Coast have tripled the rate at which they are conducting vaccinations as compared to 3 months ago.
In Africa, Ivory Coast has tripled its daily administration of COVID-19 vaccine doses in three months, the region's World Health Organization chapter says.

Germany will require visitors who have not been vaccinated to have a negative test in order to enter the country.
In Europe, Germany will require people entering the country to show a negative coronavirus test if they haven't been vaccinated or recently recovered from COVID-19.
 
The following story is mainly based on internal documents leaked from the US health authorities and discusses the delta variant and how it compares to earlier ones.
Delta variant as contagious as chickenpox, CDC says

The basics of it are that the spread of the delta variant has changed a lot of assumptions that had been previously made about the nature of the pandemic.

The delta variant is var more contagious than common cold or flu, and is about as contagious as chicken pox. It can be passed on by vaccinated people to others and the disease that it causes is more serious than previous versions.

So to sum up so far, stats that you may have seen so far on how readily the virus spreads, how many people get ill, who is at risk, and what your risk of serious illness or death is are out of date, because the delta variant is quite a different thing from what has come before.

One of the internal US documents referenced in the story said they need to "acknowledge the war has changed".

However, the vaccines we have now are still very effective at protecting you from serious illness or death.

Among the recommendations are mandatory vaccination of health care workers, and the return of wearing of masks, the latter having been abandoned in many parts of the US.


One item mentioned in passing in the story is that the US stopped reporting mild cases in the spring. This would seem to imply that the rate of infection in the US is much higher than the official figures would seem to indicate.

The story goes on to talk about how the WHO describe what is going on in the rest of the world. One top WHO official described the delta variant as "we are fighting the same virus, but a virus that has become fitter."

The story further describes how the delta variant is surging in much of the world. I won't bother covering that, as it goes over the same ground as I deal with in the regular COVID-19 summaries that I post.


So, the thing to take away from all of this is that the delta variant is quite a different thing from the previous versions, and what you may have heard from people basing their opinions on older data is obsolete.

However, vaccines still work, and it is more important than ever to get vaccinated because you can't rely on herd immunity to protect you while you make up your mind.

I will speculate that we will see booster shots coming out at some point which specifically target the delta variant in order to get ahead of it again, but that may not be until late this year or some time next year. These may involve newer vaccines, different from the ones we have now.
 
By the way, @exbleep , I notice that Spain seem to have one of the highest vaccination rates in the EU. They seem to be conducting a fairly successful vaccination campaign.

They are doing well on the vaccine front (second highest percentage in Europe, not just the EU, after Malta) but cases, like UK, going up and this month has been terrible.
Started off at the end of June with a couple of thousand new cases a day but went up to 29,000 just the other day and dropped down to 24,500 yesterday.

Thankfully, deaths still at a low (ish) level but some areas have an increased number of hospitalisations.
Some areas starting to vaccinate the 12 to 18 year olds this week (not my area, Valencia, which is still in the 20 to 29 age group) and will receive an extra 3.4 million doses of Pfizer in August so the target of 70% of the total population to have both doses should be on target for the end of the month or earlier.

They opened quite a few mass vaccination centres and stuck rigidly to the 2nd dose after 3 weeks with Pfizer, 4 weeks with Moderna. They had to increase the gap for AZ to 12 weeks as the jabs regularly failed to turn up or just 10% of the promised amount delivered but have now cut that gap to 8 weeks.

The Janssen vaccine is being transported to rural towns and villages for the one dose.

British media reporting Spain could be put into Amber plus (how many more levels can they come out with?) due to the so-called Beta variant but that one isn't being given much press time in Spain. Co-ordinator of the covid scheme was on the box just Wednesday and stated the dominant variant was the so-called Delta one with some regions saying 96% of cases are that one with an 86.3% throughout Spain. Only one region (Castilla-La Mancha) showing the Beta variant at over 12% of cases, the rest say it is so low they don't even mention it. He also pointed out that 83% of those hospitalised are those who have not been vaccinated at all and all the deaths over the last fortnight (about 200) have been either very elderly or not vaccinated.

We've had a couple of tradesmen at the house over the last couple of weeks (plumber and someone to adjust my satellite dish) and they turned up with facemasks on. First question to us was "have you had both jabs?" and when we said yes they said so have we and removed the masks. They were very careful to keep the 1.5m distance, though.

The curfew from 0100 to 0600 in the Valencia province only affected one town in our province (Alicante) at the start but that has increased to 5 in the last lot of restrictions announced, one of them being the infamous Benidorm but the hotels there are reporting an 87% occupancy rate for August. Whether that will change if UK puts them on Amber plus will have to be seen.

Cruising started again and a ship (German one, part of TUI) docked in Valencia and had 4 cases on board so the entire ship was quarantined for 5 days even though the passengers were limited to 50% of capacity.
 

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
Leaked CDC report from the states.

Summary from the report that appears to have been leaked in a powerpoint/briefing format.

Highly contagious.

Likely more severe illness ( not deaths, but increase in severe illness )

Breakthrough infection may be as transmissable as unvaccinated cases ( a vaccinated person getting Delta, could be as icontagious as an unvaccinated person )

Delta is different from previous strains.

Vaccines preventing 90% of severe disease,BUT less effective at infection or transmission...more breakthroughs and community spread despite vaccination.

Mask wearing is ESSENTIAL, vaccinated persons who are infected could be shedding very high viral loads.

Delta Variant is MORE transmissable than ......

MERS & SARS, EBOLA,Common Cold, Seasonal Flue and Spansish Flu ( 1918 ), Small Pox

Delta Variant is as transmissable as chicken pox.

Breaththrough infections are expected amongst vaccinated people who congregate and for those that the vaccine is compromised with, such as persons with existing ailments ( vulnerable groups )

 
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One needs to be a bit careful when comparing percentages vaccinated. The UK Government tends to only publish % of the adult population rather than % of total population. The official figures released today are 88.4% received first vaccination and 71.8% both, but that is of the adult population.

Agreed with the percentages. For some reason Spain quotes the percentage of the entire population. If it were only those over 18 (38,690,000 as at 2020) the figures would be 82% with one jab and 72% with both.

Even so, the number of cases in the Valencia region, including the Alicante province, reached their highest level today since last Feb when the 3rd wave was at its height. (They don't publish deaths at the weekend due to skewed reporting). Beta variant, though, has dropped to 2.9% of cases in Spain which is down from a high of 9% a week ago. Still beats me why the UK media (or some of them) go on about worries about the increase in Beta variant cases when there obviously isn't one.
 
Leaked CDC report from the states.

Summary from the report that appears to have been leaked in a powerpoint/briefing format.

Highly contagious.

Likely more severe illness ( not deaths, but increase in severe illness )

Breakthrough infection may be as transmissable as unvaccinated cases ( a vaccinated person getting Delta, could be as icontagious as an unvaccinated person )

Delta is different from previous strains.

Vaccines preventing 90% of severe disease,BUT less effective at infection or transmission...more breakthroughs and community spread despite vaccination.

Mask wearing is ESSENTIAL, vaccinated persons who are infected could be shedding very high viral loads.

Delta Variant is MORE transmissable than ......

MERS & SARS, EBOLA,Common Cold, Seasonal Flue and Spansish Flu ( 1918 ), Small Pox

Delta Variant is as transmissable as chicken pox.

Breaththrough infections are expected amongst vaccinated people who congregate and for those that the vaccine is compromised with, such as persons with existing ailments ( vulnerable groups )

Video not showing for me.
 
Here is the COVID-19 summary for Saturday.
Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on July 31

In Paris, protesters marched and did the usual, including throwing stuff at the police. The protests are related to the new law requiring COVID passes (vaccination, negative test, etc.) to enter various public places such as restaurants. According to the polls, the majority of French support the requirement. The delta variant is taking off in France, with 24,000 new cases on Friday. The new pass takes effect on the 9th of August. Unvaccinated French are signing up to get the jab to avoid pass related problems, which of course was the intention in the first place.
In Europe, thousands of people protested France's special virus pass by marching through Paris and other cities on Saturday. Most demonstrations were peaceful, but some protesters in Paris clashed with riot police, who fired tear gas.

(...) With virus infections spiking and hospitalizations rising, French lawmakers have passed a bill requiring the pass in most places as of Aug. 9. Polls show a majority of French support the pass, but some are adamantly opposed. The pass requires a vaccination or a quick negative test or proof of a recent recovery from COVID-19 and mandates vaccine shots for all health-care workers by mid-September.

Tokyo hit another record for new cases on Saturday, with 4,058.
In Asia, the number of COVID-19 cases reported in Tokyo reached a daily record 4,058 at the mid-point of the Olympics, according to city hall on Saturday.

Infection is spreading in Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria, and other parts of Africa and the number new cases is rising as the delta variant proliferates.
In Africa, health officials say cases have risen sharply in Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria and elsewhere in the continent's West amid low vaccination rates and delta variant spread.

In the US, the state of Florida reported 21,683 new cases, their highest ever.
In the Americas, the U.S. state of Florida reported 21,683 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, the state's highest one-day total since the start of the pandemic, according to federal health data.
 
Here's more detail on the situation in West Africa.
West Africa battling rising COVID-19 case counts

Like many things in Africa the health data is a bit dodgy, but the hospitals and cemeteries are under heavy load as illness and death rise rapidly.
A resurgence of coronavirus cases in West Africa is hitting the region hard, inundating cemeteries where funeral numbers are rising and hospitals where beds are becoming scarce.

There was a shortage of vaccine in the region, but there was also a lot of people reluctant to get vaccinated because of the usual conspiracy theories circulating. Now that everyone is seeing others drop like flies around them however, many people have suddenly decided that they want their jabs after all.

"At the beginning, there were people who gave false information, but when people noticed an increase of contaminations and deaths, people understood that only vaccination can save them," said Bamba Fall, mayor of the Medina municipality in Senegal's capital, Dakar.

"Initially, I was hesitant to take the vaccine because I saw many conspiracy theories and also the anti-vaccine media campaign appeared stronger," said Harris Fomba Tarnue, principal of the Booker Washington Institute, Liberia's oldest technical high school.

"But when I reflected a lot on taking vaccines in the '60s and '70s, and the (beneficial) impact vaccines now have on global health, I concluded it's a must for me and my family to take."

Still, vaccine supply is very limited, with only 82 million doses have arrived so far for a population of 1.3 billion.
 
And more detail on the situation in the US, where Florida are the centre of infection.
Florida, COVID-19 epicentre in the U.S., breaks record with more than 21,000 new cases

Florida have reported 21,683 new cases, which is a record for them. They account for one fifth of all new cases in the US.
Florida reported 21,683 new cases of COVID-19, the state's highest one-day total since the start of the pandemic, according to federal health data released Saturday, as its theme park resorts again started asking visitors to wear masks indoors.

The state has become the new national epicentre for the virus, accounting for around a fifth of all new cases in the U.S. as the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus continues to spread.

They also reported 409 deaths for the week, which is down from the peak of 1,266 a year ago.
The state reported 409 deaths this week, bringing the total to more than 39,000 since its first in March 2020. The state's peak happened in mid-August 2020, when 1,266 people died over a seven-day period. Deaths usually follow increases in hospitalizations by a few weeks.

Hospitalisations are getting close to last year's peak and some hospitals are shutting down non-emergency surgeries to free up resources for COVID-19 patients.
The Florida Hospital Association said Friday that statewide COVID-19 hospitalizations are nearing last year's peak, and one of the state's largest health-care systems, AdventHealth's Central Florida Division, this week advised it would no longer be conducting non-emergency surgeries in order to free up resources for COVID-19 patients.

Some private employers such as Disney are reversing course and are once again requiring visitors to wear masks. They are also requiring employees who work on site to get vaccinated.

However, the state government's own response appears to involve hiding with their heads under the covers and hoping it will all go away. The actions they have taken involve things like forbidding schools from requiring students to wear masks.
 
And now some business news.

Business travel has not yet recovered from the pandemic, and isn't expected to any time soon. Forecasts are that travel levels will only reach 80 per cent of pre-pandemic levels by 2024.
Business travel isn't expected to return to pre-pandemic levels anytime soon

Many of the companies that depend heavily on business travellers are expected to continue to struggle. McKinsey's report on the airline industry forecasts pre-pandemic travel levels won't be reached until 2024, and even then will only be at 80 per cent.

Business travel accounts for 50 to 75 per cent of the profits for some airlines. They are going to continue to get squeezed by this, and they have limited ability to make this up by increasing prices for more cost-sensitive vacation travel customers. Hotels and restaurants which serve business customers will feel the effects as well.

Virtual meetings on-line made major inroads during the pandemic, and this is likely to continue. A lot of businesses will be looking to limit in person meetings in order to save costs now that they have seen how well on line meetings can work. Business travel will still continue, but on a more selective basis.

And while the airline industry may be a while recovering, oil companies are racking up profits now that prices have recovered.
Oilpatch revival underway with robust profits so far this year
After racking up debt in 2020, the Canadian oilpatch is enjoying a rebound so far this year as major oil producers are gushing profits as oil prices are near a seven-year high.

This week, many energy companies based in Calgary unveiled their latest earnings reports and for the second straight quarter, the industry showed hefty profits.

The pandemic pain of last year appears to be firmly in the rearview mirror.

You may recall how last year oil prices actually went negative as some people with oil to sell found that they have to pay other people to take it off their hands.

Now prices are at a 7 year high, losses have been reversed, and companies are making money again.

Most oil producers in Canada appear to be taking advantage of this to pay down debt accumulated over the past couple of years when demand and prices cratered.
 
More and more countries are mixing doses, that is using first and second doses from different vaccines.
Canada was an outlier on mixing COVID-19 vaccines, but more countries now following suit

Canada was one of the first countries to do this on a significant scale, but is being joined by others such as Bahrain, Bhutan, Indonesia, Italy, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates, Uruguay and Vietnam.

Using doses from different manufacturers or different technologies is routine with other vaccines, so form a scientific basis it is not particularly controversial.

However, some countries such as the US don't recognise mixed doses as being valid for travel purposes, causing bureaucratic problems. This like other vaccine approval issues will need to be resolved at the international level before travel and tourism can return.
 
The following is a story on the delta variant. One of the things it mentions is two theories on why it is more infectious than previous versions.
Why the delta variant is spreading COVID-19 so quickly — and what that means for Canada

The delta variant is estimated to be 50 per cent more infectious than the alpha variant, which in turn was 50 per cent more infectious than the original version.
Scientists estimate it's spreading roughly 50 per cent faster than the alpha variant, which was 50 per cent more contagious than the original virus strain, according to the Yale School of Public Health.

One theory of why it is more infectious is that a mutation in the "spike" protein which the virus uses to enter the cell somehow has made the spike fit receptor areas on the cell better, allowing it to enter more easily.
One lab-based study published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, from researchers at the Kumamoto University and Weizmann Institute of Science, suggests mutations on the spike protein of this SARS-CoV-2 variant can evade cellular immunity and may increase its infectivity.

The spike protein is a crucial feature on the surface of the coronavirus that allows it to gain access to our cells, explained University of Ottawa epidemiologist Raywat Deonandan.

"It fits into a receptor on our cells and then it enters the cell via that receptor. Something about the mutation has changed the shape or a feature on the spike protein that makes it fit a bit better," he said.


Another theory is that people tend to have 1,000 times more virus in their noses with the delta variant than the original version, which means they spread more of it around. Also people are able to infect other people more quickly after getting infected themselves, at around 4 days after infection instead of 6.
Another study from a team in China, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, found people infected with the delta variant carried, on average, a more than 1,000 times higher amount of virus in their nose compared to the original strain — which likely means they're shedding more of it.

The researchers also found people carrying this variant test positive faster: around four days after exposure, compared to around six for the original strain. That suggests delta replicates at a quicker pace inside someone's body.

"You may actually excrete more virus and that's why it's more transmissible," microbiologist Sharon Peacock, who runs the U.K.'s efforts to sequence the genomes of coronavirus variants, recently told Reuters.
 
Here is the COVID-19 summary for Sunday.
Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Sunday

In Japan, two silver medallists from Georgia have had their credentials lifted for having gone sight seeing after they finished their events. Since they were already done anyway and had to leave, it's not clear if this really amounts to any sort of actual punishment as there was nothing about their medals being revoked.
Toshiro Muto, the games chief executive, said it was a "clear and serious violation" of the so-called playbooks of health and safety rules for two Georgian judokas to go sight-seeing.

Vazha Margvelashvili and Lasha Shavdatuashvili were seen near Tokyo Tower on Tuesday, after their events were finished.

Muto said the Georgian embassy in Tokyo has apologized.

An outdoor drinking party involving athletes is also being investigated. They are allowed to drink alone in their rooms, but not attend parties.
Separately, organizers say they're investigating an outdoor drinking party involving multiple athletes at the village where they're staying.

In Berlin, protesters protested about pandemic control measures. Police detained approximately 600 protesters. The caption in one of the photos in the story mentions that the protesters included the usual mixture of nutters, including anti-vaxxers, virus denialists, plus the usual mob who come out for anything.
In Europe, thousands turned out in Berlin on Sunday to protest the German government's anti-coronavirus measures despite a ban on the gatherings, leading to clashes with police and the detention of some 600 protesters.

Cambodia have begun to vaccinate teenagers aged 12 to 17 in some provinces.
In Asia, Cambodia began a nationwide drive to vaccinate minors against the coronavirus. The country aims to inoculate about two million of people aged 12 to 17 years before November of this year, beginning in Phnom Penh Municipality and three nearby provinces.

In the US, the state of Florida reported yet another new record of 10,207 new cases. Florida have the highest hospitalisation rate in the US, emergency room patients are being accommodated in hallways, and there is a noticeable drop in the average age of patients. The state government are apparently doing little to nothing to deal with the immediate situation.
In the Americas, COVID-19 hospitalizations reached a record 10,207 in the U.S. state of Florida on Sunday — just a day after it reported its most new daily cases since the start of the pandemic.

Florida is now leading the U.S. in per capita hospitalizations for COVID-19, as hospitals around the state report having to put emergency room visitors in beds in hallways and others document a noticeable drop in the age of patients.
 
Torygraph this morning reporting 32m U.K. citizens to be given a vaccine booster from next month as the antibodies are wearing off. Given the Indian mutation infects vaccinated people and reinfected people that have already had it, we have open borders and we haven’t vaccinated the entire population, someone needs to wake up and smell the coffee and accept we have lost the battle against Covid.

As for business travel, which is mentioned in a couple of earlier posts, I’d say business and leisure travel and unlikely to return to previous levels at all, either because of restrictions getting into other countries and the associated costs of isolating, or because it’s just too hard, and the tech makes it redundant for business travellers anyway.

the other one that’s been in the press over the last couple of days is healthcare professionals are concerned about mutation emerging as a result of high vaccination rates that is more transmissible and far more lethal than the current mutations we have. 1 in 3 deaths was the model they have built. That’s quite a big number and would result in a total collapse of the supply chain and a break down in law and order.

not seen mention of the Peruvian mutation for a good few days. That’s rumoured to be more lethal and more transmissible than the Indian mutation.

I don’t think we are fcuked, but I’m not banking on things returning to the way in which they used to be for a very very long time, if at all.

still. On the bright side, noise pollution from aircraft circling me for Heathrow and Luton remains pretty much none existent!
 
Torygraph this morning reporting 32m U.K. citizens to be given a vaccine booster from next month as the antibodies are wearing off. Given the Indian mutation infects vaccinated people and reinfected people that have already had it, we have open borders and we haven’t vaccinated the entire population, someone needs to wake up and smell the coffee and accept we have lost the battle against Covid.

As for business travel, which is mentioned in a couple of earlier posts, I’d say business and leisure travel and unlikely to return to previous levels at all, either because of restrictions getting into other countries and the associated costs of isolating, or because it’s just too hard, and the tech makes it redundant for business travellers anyway.

the other one that’s been in the press over the last couple of days is healthcare professionals are concerned about mutation emerging as a result of high vaccination rates that is more transmissible and far more lethal than the current mutations we have. 1 in 3 deaths was the model they have built. That’s quite a big number and would result in a total collapse of the supply chain and a break down in law and order.

not seen mention of the Peruvian mutation for a good few days. That’s rumoured to be more lethal and more transmissible than the Indian mutation.

I don’t think we are fcuked, but I’m not banking on things returning to the way in which they used to be for a very very long time, if at all.

still. On the bright side, noise pollution from aircraft circling me for Heathrow and Luton remains pretty much none existent!
A month ago the BBC were reporting more detail on booster shots.

Covid: NHS plans booster jab for those 50 and over before winter

Here's who they said would be jabbed a third time.
  • adults aged 16 and over who are immunosuppressed or clinically extremely vulnerable
  • residents in care homes for older adults
  • all adults aged 70 and over
  • frontline health and social care workers
After those groups, it will be:
  • all adults aged 50 and over
  • adults aged 16-49 who are in a flu or Covid-19 at-risk group
  • those living in the same house as people who are immunosuppressed

It's very likely that many people will get a different vaccine than they did the first time as it is thought that mixing doses will give better immunity. This may also include newer vaccines such as Novovax.

The plan is apparently to give people their COVID-19 jab and their flu jab at the same time.

There is less urgency in giving younger people outside of certain groups a third jab, as many of them have just had their second.

As for some of the other issues you mention, I suspect that a lot of business travel won't be coming back simply because video conferencing has proven so successful and saves money. The pandemic has accelerated something that was going to happen anyway.

As for leisure travel, I think that will come back, indeed it already is to some extent, but people may have to be a bit more choosy about where they go if they don't want to risk booking a vacation somewhere that ends up on a travel blacklist or which goes into lockdown the whole time they are there. I would also avoid spending money on a trip on a cruise ship for the foreseeable future.

And as for new variants, I think we will continue seeing them for some time. However, I also think we will keep ahead of them in terms of new or tweaked vaccines. Quite a few countries are building their own vaccine production facilities in order to have a secure supply, and they have gotten pretty good at rolling out vaccination programs at scale. We will be in a much better position at the end of this year in that regards than we were at the start.
 
Here is the COVID-19 summary for Monday.
Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Monday

The US hit their target of 70 per cent of adults (not total population) having had their first jab. This is a month late from their original target date of the 4th of July. The 70 per cent number was based on what they thought would be needed for herd immunity, but that was before the spread of the delta variant which likely requires a much higher vaccination target. I just took a look at a global vaccination stats site and the US vaccination rate is behind nearly all of Western Europe, greatly so in many cases.
The U.S. on Monday finally reached President Joe Biden's goal of getting at least one COVID-19 shot in the arms of 70 per cent of American adults — a month late and amid a surge in cases due to the delta variant.

Biden had set a goal of reaching the 70 per cent threshold by the July 4th national holiday. But that target was set well before the highly contagious delta variant led to a resurgence in cases and undermined assumptions used in arriving at that figure.

Also in the US, states across the US are re-introducing pandemic measures which they had previously abandoned as infection continues to spread through the population.
Louisiana ordered nearly everyone, vaccinated or not, to wear masks again in all indoor public settings, including schools and colleges. Other cities and states have moved to reinstate precautions to counter a crisis blamed on the fast-spreading variant and stubborn resistance to getting the vaccine.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said New York City airport and transit workers will have to get vaccinated or face weekly testing. He stopped short of mandating either masks or inoculations for the general public, saying he lacks legal authority to do so.

Health officials in San Francisco and six other Bay Area counties announced Monday they are reinstating a requirement that everyone — vaccinated or not — wear masks in public indoor spaces.

Denver's mayor said the city will require police officers, firefighters and certain other municipal employees to get vaccinated, along with workers at schools, nursing homes, hospitals and jails.

Minnesota's public colleges and universities will require masks while indoors on campus, regardless of vaccination status. And New Jersey said workers at state-run nursing homes, psychiatric hospitals and other such institutions must get the shot or face regular testing.

In Pakistan, shop owners in Karachi protested against lockdown, which they said is costing them business.
In Asia, hundreds of Pakistani businessmen, mostly shop owners, rallied in the southern port city of Karachi against a lockdown imposed to curb a surge in COVID-19 cases.

Venezuela expect to receive 6.2 million doses of vaccine through COVAX soon.
In the Americas, Venezuela will receive 6.2 million doses of vaccines through the COVAX initiative "in the coming days," President Nicolas Maduro has said.

Moldova received 500,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) vaccine from the US.
In Europe, 150,000 doses of a planned 500,000-dose supply of Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccines have arrived in Moldova — a donation from the U.S. to help the former Soviet republic inoculate its small nation.

Doctors in Nigerian hospitals are on strike over things such as some doctors not getting COVID-19 allowances and staffing shortages.
In Africa, resident doctors in Nigerian public hospitals began an indefinite strike over grievances they said included failing to pay COVID-19 allowances to some doctors and staffing shortages in hospitals, according to the doctors' union.
 

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