Merry Ostara

#1
Merry Ostara to you all, otherwise known as the Vernal Equinox when night and day becomes equal and light will defeat the dark.
 
#4
In Iran it's called Chaharshanbeh Suri and people celebrate it by lighting fires. The Islamic Mullahs loathe it since the origin is pre Islamic, but in their corrupt haplessness they are unable to erase it from the culture.
 
Last edited:

smeg-head

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#8
One of the many pagan (pre-Christian) festivals that slots almost perfectly into the Christian calendar because no definite date can be identified for the Birth, Death or Resurrection of Christ. Seaturnalia is another biggy.
 
Last edited:
#9
#10
A crappy poem for@CivvyLurker

The girl I took home was a prize
She had such beautiful eyes
Her breasts were well kept
As you would expect
But her penis was quite a surprise !
 
#11
This is what modern druids reckon:

To discover what Awen is, we should first look at what the word means. The feminine noun, Awen, has been variously translated as 'inspiration', 'muse', 'genius', or even 'poetic frenzy'. According to a 19th century Welsh dictionary, the word itself is formed by combining the two words, aw, meaning 'a fluid, a flowing', and en, meaning 'a living principle, a being, a spirit, essential'. So Awen may be rendered literally as 'a fluid essence', or 'flowing spirit'. However, more recent dictionaries do not support this interpretation. The next stage of our quest takes us to the surviving works of the Bards of medieval Britain, who were both the inheritors and the medium of transmission of remnants of pagan Druid tradition.

The so-called Four Ancient Books of Wales; the White Book of Rhydderch, the Red Book of Hergest, the Black Book of Caermarthen, and especially the 13th century Book of Taliesin, contain a number of poems which refer to Awen. These vary widely in date. Some may be as old as the era of the Cynfeirdd, or 'Early Bards,' which began in the 6th century, while most are much later, composed shortly before the compilation of the manuscripts in which they are found. In seeking to establish what medieval Bards understood by the term Awen, we are hampered by the fact that their poetic style is often enigmatic and allusive. There are, however, clues to be found. The 12th century poet, Llywarch ap Llywelyn (c.1173-1220), also known by his splendid Bardic name, Prydydd y Moch, the 'Poet of the Pigs' says:

"The Lord God will give me the sweet Awen, as from the cauldron of Ceridwen."
Happy reading.

Awen - The Holy Spirit of Druidry - The British Druid Order

Leaving aside the spiritual stuff, the link (which can lead you down a rabbit hole) considers some of the little remaining evidence for pre-christian Celtic belief, as passed down through oral history tradition and recorded when monks came to Britain.

Like @BratMedic says, these days it's an excuse for blokes to grow a Gandalf beard, dress up in a sheet, and recite dodgy poetry round a fire in the woods.

For the record, I have neither beard, nor fancy sheet, nor a hankering for crappy poetry even when pished.
 
#12
A crappy poem for@CivvyLurker

The girl I took home was a prize
She had such beautiful eyes
Her breasts were well kept
As you would expect
But her penis was quite a surprise !
And there I was, composing a sensible response for Signaller while you were lowering the tone, you nasty heathen.

I take it from your limerical leanings you follow the Irish Celtic tradition?
 
#15
And there I was, composing a sensible response for Signaller while you were lowering the tone, you nasty heathen.

I take it from your limerical leanings you follow the Irish Celtic tradition?
Follows the cross-dresser tradition more like
 
#16
This is what modern druids reckon:



Happy reading.

Awen - The Holy Spirit of Druidry - The British Druid Order

Leaving aside the spiritual stuff, the link (which can lead you down a rabbit hole) considers some of the little remaining evidence for pre-christian Celtic belief, as passed down through oral history tradition and recorded when monks came to Britain.

Like @BratMedic says, these days it's an excuse for blokes to grow a Gandalf beard, dress up in a sheet, and recite dodgy poetry round a fire in the woods.

For the record, I have neither beard, nor fancy sheet, nor a hankering for crappy poetry even when pished.

If I understand it right, then, the early bard captures the awen?


Sorry... I'll get me sheet...

.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top