Memorable stuff from your formative years

I may have mentioned earlier in this thread, the horse drawn coal delivery cart that used to trundle around locally from the coal depot sited at the freight yard on the North London Railway Line pretty much at the end of my street. The picture below is just how I remember the coal being carried from the cart to the houses. Dustbins had to be metal, as they were for the coal dust and (sometimes still hot) ashes. And the boy is dressed just how I used to be dressed at that age.

20211118_OBP001.jpg

Memories of Merv the Swerve, worked for his dad delivering coal in the 60's 70's, played on the wing. His hand off made Jonah Lomu look wimpish
 
My mother was a great fan of bread and/or mustard poultices, a dish served (red)hot! Into house with a yellow pus filled wound - out came the poultice.

It worked, but it may also have been a subtle form of deterrent!
 
My mother was a into her herbs, I took a large chunk out of my shin by running into a pipe end took a chunk like a cork out. She packed it with a comfrey poultice (from ) the garden . Treated the scab /scar with buttercup ointment. Healed well.
Aka spearwort
 

BlipDriver

War Hero
My mum had no qualms about signing off on all kinds of ferocious and/or experimental medications for us. She seemed positively eager, now I think about it.

I may have to revisit her care arrangements.
I was a guinea pig for the MMR vaccine, the target of choice for anti-vaxxers until COVID. (I can count the side effects to 16 decimal places on the fingers of one earlobe - ooh a squirrel).
 
I remember getting Benylin with Codeine for some nasty chest infection, I remember it because my mum had to sign the poisons book for it which she was not happy about
Benylin - one of the items to seek out at the teen parties of yore at the point of the evening when even the Watneys party sevens had been emptied. A splash of soda helped it down.

My mother was a into her herbs, I took a large chunk out of my shin by running into a pipe end took a chunk like a cork out. She packed it with a comfrey poultice (from ) the garden . Treated the scab /scar with buttercup ointment. Healed well.
Aka spearwort

Burn the witch! BURN HER!!!
 
My mother was a into her herbs, I took a large chunk out of my shin by running into a pipe end took a chunk like a cork out. She packed it with a comfrey poultice (from ) the garden . Treated the scab /scar with buttercup ointment. Healed well.
Aka spearwort
Meadowsweet contains salicylic acid which is aspirin, a tea made from meadowsweet leaves can help with pain especially headaches.
 
I normally don't have much belief in most of the herbal remedies, apart from one.
Arnica cream. I can say it does a very good job of reducing swelling and bruising after a hard bump. I have no idea what the active ingredient is, but it definitely works.
 
I normally don't have much belief in most of the herbal remedies, apart from one.
Arnica cream. I can say it does a very good job of reducing swelling and bruising after a hard bump. I have no idea what the active ingredient is, but it definitely works.
Many modern day pharmaceuticals all started from plant based remedies, Aspirin being the most famous. Elder berries have both anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties and a syrup from these can be good for sore throats or as a cough medicine. Plantain broadleaf and narrowleaf contain antihistamine good for insect bites, dock leaves are similar. Nettles contain very high amounts of iron and are good for people with anaemia.

Hawthorn leaves have a mild effect on heart behaviour and foxgloves contain digitalis which is still used in heart medicine today.
 
Meadowsweet contains salicylic acid which is aspirin, a tea made from meadowsweet leaves can help with pain especially headaches.
Feverfew does the same. We had some in the garden and chewing the leaves (well washed, cooking fats!) gets rid of a headache quite fast.
Thinking about it, a tea would probably be better than chewing, as I gave up using it after associating mouth ulcers afterwards.
 
Feverfew does the same. We had some in the garden and chewing the leaves (well washed, cooking fats!) gets rid of a headache quite fast.
Thinking about it, a tea would probably be better than chewing, as I gave up using it after associating mouth ulcers afterwards.
You can use willow bark as well, as that contains salicylic acid as well. Steep some inner bark in hot water for 10 minutes, sweeten with honey as it can taste a bit woody :)
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Reminded of visiting Boots in the 80s and Zero Alpha asks for Calpol (until I saw a bottle, I thought it was Cowpole).

Assistant looks at her and says, "BAOR?"

"How did you know?"

"We get lots of BAOR residents asking for multiple bottles. Seems when someone is coming back, they get requests to bring some back. 'The Calpol Run.'"
 
I may have mentioned earlier in this thread, the horse drawn coal delivery cart that used to trundle around locally from the coal depot sited at the freight yard on the North London Railway Line pretty much at the end of my street. The picture below is just how I remember the coal being carried from the cart to the houses. Dustbins had to be metal, as they were for the coal dust and (sometimes still hot) ashes. And the boy is dressed just how I used to be dressed at that age.

20211118_OBP001.jpg

Well the Economist's "The World Ahead" 2022 edition is out and for its obituary page it has this:

It reminded me that in my early years most of the houses in my area still burned coal. We lived in a a late Victorian terraced house with a purpose built coal cellar. It was converted to accomodate the boiler and the hot water tank as we were early converts to gas central heating.

I tried to find a relevant picture online. The closest that I could get to Holloway was Tottenham and it looks like it was from the seventies (judging by the bus shape):
Horse-drawn-coal-merchants-cart-in-Tottenham-High-Road-North-London-January-1974-1280x866.jpg
I remember that the coal men often wore a hat with a long leather sort of beaver tail attached that went down their backs. I suppose that they were protection from the heavy coal sacks that they hauled off the backs of the carts/lorries and tipped into your coal bunker.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
Who owns the coal hole , what I'm really asking is , could you extend your basement to under the street ?
 
I remember that the coal men often wore a hat with a long leather sort of beaver tail attached that went down their backs. I suppose that they were protection from the heavy coal sacks that they hauled off the backs of the carts/lorries and tipped into your coal bunker.
My mate's Dad was a coal man; sometimes if we were about when he finished his round we'd ride on the back of the flat-bed Bedford, holding on to the grid at the front from Benfleet, back to his yard in Pitsea. This was in the '60s, never got stopped, although Mum used to get pissed off at the state I'd come back in.

His yard was down near the railway line to Tilbury, and there were some old-time Pikeys living nearby. He'd park his old Austin Cambridge by the (now old) A13 during the day, and he noticed slight indications that it was being used, mileage confirmed it. There was never any mess or damage, and the petrol was always roughly the same, give or take.
It just amused him, luckily, as he was as wide as tall.
 

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