Memorable stuff from your formative years

Only hear steam whistles on heritage railways nowadays. Very evocative sound, When I was a kid we used to stand on bridges and wave at the oncoming trains. If you were lucky the driver would give you a toot as he passed under and you vanished in a cloud of steam. I guess the extended neeee-nawwww from an air horn is the better modern equivalent.
The racket of airhorns on US railroads is incessant. The locos howl incessantly (warning bell as well on many of them). It probably has something to do with the fact that the loading gauge in such places is very much greater than here and as a result overbridges and underbridges are much rarer with a far greater dependence on level crossings.

Lineside fencing is also quite a rarity, with a lot more wandering onto the tracks of people and animals.
 
Don't Rugby League stadiums use a factory hooter to signal full time ?
Union certainly does - refs these days have enough to keep an eye on, without looking at their watches, so a bloke upstairs does a stop/start during breaks in play.
AND how is that for serendipity, my above post was about Green Point.
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Note the GBFO stadium - that is where the Lions played earlier this year, and one half of the game lasted over an hour.
 
The racket on US railroad is incessant. The locos howl incessantly (warning bell as well on many of them). It probably has something to do with the fact that the loading guage in such places is very much greater than here and as a result overbridges and underbridges are much rarer with a far greater dependence on level crossings.

US railroads have a rule that the horn must be blown (fnarr) at every crossing and station approach.
UK railways only blow at whistle boards like these; or if anyone is seen on or near the line.

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CharleyBourne

War Hero
Growing up in the 80s we used to spend a lot of time in the local woods, lighting fires (in a non-arson way), damming streams, crashing bikes etc

Every now and again we would discover a Porny Bush where somebody had for some reason stashed their collection of porn, usually in plastic bags. It was like Aussie Gold Hunters discovering the mother lode and the mags ranging from Razzle and Mayfair to Whitehouse were divvied up amongst those of us brave or stupid enough to smuggle them home.

I once created a Porny Bush myself. I was going away for a week on cadet camp and feared my dad would do a cell search, so smuggled my impressive collection of porn out of the house and concealed it under a fallen tree in an area of woodland that was private land.

I was very upset when I later went to retrieve it that some thieving b@stard had found and taken the lot. It still hurts today.

R4 a while back had a discussion why the top shelf still exists in newsagents when there is unlimited frankie on t'internet. A bit like manual typewriters and vinyl I suppose.
 
I'm not sure that they do. I'm talking about the bfo old school land-based foghorns, not those peepy short-range airhorns of the type you'd expect to hear at a football match. I think that there are one or two of the proper type that are maintained by heritage trusts and sounded on the occasional open day for tourists and visitors. AFAIK none are used operationally.

Apart from anything else, who would maintain and operate them? The lights are all automatic now and all the stations are unmanned and have been for many years. Many of the old fog horns are still in situ but are no longer operational.

The horn disappeared from one of my holiday destinations a few years ago. The old compressed air horns had been replaced by an electronic sounder. I miss it - it told you it was a shite day before you'd looked out of the window.

I think fog signals can be operated by an optical device, detecting the poor visibility. In the manned days they could use a feature at a known distance to define it.
 
The horn disappeared from one of my holiday destinations a few years ago. The old compressed air horns had been replaced by an electronic sounder. I miss it - it told you it was a shite day before you'd looked out of the window.

I think fog signals can be operated by an optical device, detecting the poor visibility. In the manned days they could use a feature at a known distance to define it.

There's a stretch of sea in the far north of Scotland called the Pentland Firth. For various tidal reasons it is the most treacherous sea area in the British Isles. As a result, the surrounding coastline is thick with lighthouses and, at one time, their associated foghorns. On a calm, foggy night (or day) the air used to be full of the sound of distant foghorns.
 
Growing up in the 80s we used to spend a lot of time in the local woods, lighting fires (in a non-arson way), damming streams, crashing bikes etc

Every now and again we would discover a Porny Bush where somebody had for some reason stashed their collection of porn, usually in plastic bags. It was like Aussie Gold Hunters discovering the mother lode and the mags ranging from Razzle and Mayfair to Whitehouse were divvied up amongst those of us brave or stupid enough to smuggle them home.

I once created a Porny Bush myself. I was going away for a week on cadet camp and feared my dad would do a cell search, so smuggled my impressive collection of porn out of the house and concealed it under a fallen tree in an area of woodland that was private land.

I was very upset when I later went to retrieve it that some thieving b@stard had found and taken the lot. It still hurts today.

R4 a while back had a discussion why the top shelf still exists in newsagents when there is unlimited frankie on t'internet. A bit like manual typewriters and vinyl I suppose.
Porn bushes were sometimes in the oddest places. I remember walking home from school one day with some mates and we were mucking about on a steep bit of waste ground next to the recently widened road, when we came across a plastic bag full of porn mags in a bush. Some were of the still legally unavailable continental type and they subsequently disappeared into a special hiding place.
 
There's an stretch of sea in the far north of Scotland called the Pentland Firth. For various tidal reasons it is the most treacherous sea area in the British Isles. As a result, the surronding coastline is thick with lighthouses and, at one time, their associated foghorns. On a calm, foggy night (or day) the air used to be full of the sound of distant foghorns.

I was reading about the Pentland Firth not long ago - more than a few recent losses of ships and lives. Also the lifeboat disaster just over 50 years ago:

 
Porn bushes were sometimes in the oddest places. I remember walking home from school one day with some mates and we were mucking about on a steep bit of waste ground next to the recently widened Archway Road, when we came across a plastic bag full of porn mags in a bush. Some were of the still legally unavailable continental type and they subsequently disappeared into a special hiding place.

I often wondered about that because you never actually came across anybody in a bush having a wānk.
 
I often wondered about that because you never actually came across anybody in a bush having a wānk.
Unless you were really unlucky.
 
I'm not sure that they do. I'm talking about the bfo old school land-based foghorns, not those peepy short-range airhorns of the type you'd expect to hear at a football match. I think that there are one or two of the proper type that are maintained by heritage trusts and sounded on the occasional open day for tourists and visitors. AFAIK none are used operationally.

Apart from anything else, who would maintain and operate them? The lights are all automatic now and all the stations are unmanned and have been for many years. Many of the old fog horns are still in situ but are no longer operational.
You are probably correct.

No mention of them on the Trinity House website (at least not modern/extant ones).

They were certainly around in 2017. I Googled that Scouser whingefest (just fancy that!) which was 4 years ago:
 
I often wondered about that because you never actually came across anybody in a bush having a wānk.

I once got close to something untoward. Walking through a wood that was always full of glue-sniffing junk when that was a common thing. Noticed a lad stripping off in the near distance. He saw me approaching, picked up his clothes and ran away. No idea what he was up to.
 
Not heard a factory hooter ever (as far as I can recall). I probably did but it was lost amongst the ambient noise pollution.

We still have fog horns around the UK. Both on land and on ships. Trinity House still maintains them. Many smaller boats are not required to have modern navigation devices; they either don't have them and/or don't really know how to use them. There was a big rumpus 4/5 years ago on Merseyside when the fog horns were used. A lot of people complained about the noise - seemingly they were unaware that a large port had some connection to shipping and boats.

Not heard an air raid siren for donkeys years (maybe late sixties?). Closest I got in recent years was living/working in Camberley and the escaped inmate alarm sounding at Broadmoor at 10am every Monday morning. Seemed a bit daft to me as that was obviously when a prisoner would time his escape for - the inmates were mental not stupid.

Only hear steam whistles on heritage railways nowadays. Very evocative sound, When I was a kid we used to stand on bridges and wave at the oncoming trains. If you were lucky the driver would give you a toot as he passed under and you vanished in a cloud of steam. I guess the extended neeee-nawwww from an air horn is the better modern equivalent.


My bold, Me too, in fact if you went to most mainline stations or bridges over mainlines outside of school hours there was almost sure to be at least one kid with his copy of Ian Allans book.

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trainspotting-blog1.jpg
 
My bold, Me too, in fact if you went to most mainline stations or bridges over mainlines outside of school hours there was almost sure to be at least one kid with his copy of Ian Allans book.

web-abc-1957(09).jpg


trainspotting-blog1.jpg

Newcastle on Tyne, I've seen similar views before, love the trackwork! That parapet looks a bit low, I hope nobody fell off.
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TamH70

MIA
My bold, Me too, in fact if you went to most mainline stations or bridges over mainlines outside of school hours there was almost sure to be at least one kid with his copy of Ian Allans book.

web-abc-1957(09).jpg


trainspotting-blog1.jpg

Most of the kids are in short trousers! Poor sods, their legs must have been freezing if that really was in Newcastle. I spent several happy weekends on leave there when I was down in Catterick doing various things, so I know it's bloody cold at times.
 

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