Memorable stuff from your formative years

Yep, totally agree. Ok, 4Extra does go some way toward leavening this a tad, but nowhere near enough. If the BBC and it's censors would stop and think for a moment, the sort of stuff that we are talking about is mostly from the 1940s to 1959 era, and certainly is unlikely to appeal to the modern 'woke' feeling and caring ( in a very obvious way) Islington trendy. It's more likely to appeal to the crusty old buggers such as myself, whose sensitivities have been somewhat blunted over the years, aided in the blunting by spending time in wonderfully diverse and tolerant places such as the Middle East or Ulster.
Julian and Sandy would be a leaped upon and savaged by the gay set.
Even though they were the 'champions' of polari, and much popular queer vocab derives from their use of it.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I have posted this before ... you need to visit Radio Echoes ..... it abounds with classic BBC Comedy shows ... amd all free ... I download and strore then transfer a necessary ... sound quality is normally good ... I have just discovered this morning " Likely Lads " ... linky ...

Thanks for that, I had used that site before, but it slipped my mind. As of next week I shall be confined to quarters for quite some time, so will play with that link once I am out of the ward and able to use a laptop, Many thanks.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Julian and Sandy would be a leaped upon and savaged by the gay set.
Even though they were the 'champions' of polari, and much popular queer vocab derives from their use of it.
Absolutely! They were Gay lib before there was a Gay lib. Horne had some brilliant acts with him, and although he never appeared to be doing much, he was indeed a very good comedian.
 
Thanks for that, I had used that site before, but it slipped my mind. As of next week I shall be confined to quarters for quite some time, so will play with that link once I am out of the ward and able to use a laptop, Many thanks.
Have a speedy recovery .... enjoy revisiting Radio Echoes .
 
Factory hooters - These were still being used in the 60s... maybe even in the 70s. I did not live in an industrialised area, but you would still hear the morning factory hooters from Kodak's and GEC, both of which were several miles away. I don't remember ever hearing anything at knocking off time. I have a feeling that even if they still existed, you'd probably never hear them such has been the increase in competing ambient noise pollution in urban and suburban areas.

Fog horns - Many lighthouses had these. Most had their own large diesel-powered compressed air generators in an adjoining building. When the conditions demanded it the fog horns would be sounded periodically. Similar to the light sent out by the lighthouse, each station had its own characteristic horn sound. Some kids would tremble with fear in their beds when they heard the low booming noise in the distance. I loved them. Another thing that disappeared with the introduction of alternative technologies.

Air raid sirens - Some of these continued to exist for many years after the war, serving the purpose of nuclear civil defence warnings or flood warnings. Many police stations, fire stations and public buildings had them on the roof. Occasionally they would be tested. That twin-toned howling must have struck terror in people during WW2 when they knew that an air attack really was on the way.

Steam loco whistles - Steam power was still in use up until the late '60s, later still in some industrial and colliery settings. Nothing was more reassuring as a child than hearing a lonely loco whistle in the distance at night. Fairly brings out the blues singer in me.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Air raid sirens - Some of these continued to exist for many years after the war, serving the purpose of nuclear civil defence warnings or flood warnings. Many police stations, fire stations and public buildings had them on the roof. Occasionally they would be tested. That twin-toned howling must have struck terror in people during WW2 when they knew that an air attack really was on the way.
When I was a rural bobby, my police house/station had one of these, along with a speaker which linked to the National Atomic warning. We had to test this siren twice a year. It was stored in a crate and wound by hand. Loved it, but as most of the neighbours were very elderly ( sheltered housing) they were not so keen.
 
I was a Short Wave Listener in the 50's and Happy Station Hilversum was a regular favourite of mine on a Sunday morning ... I also used to listen to Radio Moscow on which they also ran many quizzes and offers for those keen to report signal strengths etc ... I never got involved with Radio Moscow but looking back I wonder how many innocents became entrapped this way .


My bold looking at that reminds of an earlier radio show which I was fond of, (I'm showing me age now) .. It's That Man Again - Wikipedia . one of the catchlines was "the incompetent German agent Funf ("this is Funf speaking" lots of other good ones, from Mrs Mopp "Can I do you now, sir?", the bibulous Colonel Chinstrap "I don't mind if I do"),
 
Factory hooters - These were still being used in the 60s... maybe even in the 70s. I did not live in an industrialised area, but you would still hear the morning factory hooters from Kodak's and GEC, both of which were several miles away. I don't remember ever hearing anything at knocking off time. I have a feeling that even if they still existed, you'd probably never hear them such has been the increase in competing ambient noise pollution in urban and suburban areas.

Fog horns - Many lighthouses had these. Most had their own large diesel-powered compressed air generators in an adjoining building. When the conditions demanded it the fog horns would be sounded periodically. Similar to the light sent out by the lighthouse, each station had its own characteristic horn sound. Some kids would tremble with fear in their beds when they heard the low booming noise in the distance. I loved them. Another thing that disappeared with the introduction of alternative technologies.

Air raid sirens - Some of these continued to exist for many years after the war, serving the purpose of nuclear civil defence warnings or flood warnings. Many police stations, fire stations and public buildings had them on the roof. Occasionally they would be tested. That twin-toned howling must have struck terror in people during WW2 when they knew that an air attack really was on the way.

Steam loco whistles - Steam power was still in use up until the late '60s, later still in some industrial and colliery settings. Nothing was more reassuring as a child than hearing a lonely loco whistle in the distance at night. Fairly brings out the blues singer in me.

As child in sleepy Leighton Buzzard in the late 40s and early 50s, I was terrified of the former air raid siren mounted on the roof of what was then the fire station in the High Street. It was used to call out the retained firemen, and if you were nearby the noise was stupendous. The signal was the "all clear" sound rather than the up and down note of an air raid warning, but when it was switched off the siren wound down with that wavering note which somehow sent shivers down your spine.

The only consolation was the appearance minutes later of the fire engine, with bell clanging and firemen piled aboard.
 
I could not figure out if he was that good why was he on a radio station


Probably worked for Vernons or Littlewoods to encourage the mug punters to have a go.

Anyone remember the bookies runners before betting shops, popping in to take my grans flutter on tghe 2.30 @ ascot or whatever.
I do remember in 1946 all the bookies caught a cold when a horse called "Airborne" won the Derby, as it was an outsider with the number 13 @ 50 to 1. Anybody who had a family member in the Airborne mob had a flutter on him, my gran did as our neighbours son had been in & got a handsome £2.50 back for her 1/- flutter, almost a weeks wages for my grandad!

 
Talking of wireless sets then.
In a previous professional life going out to work at daft o'clock, doing what was deemed necessary and then driving home around 6 am with a big smile on my face, having done it, and then watching the sun come up over a green and pleasant land.

Oh, and then listening to this while the rest of the working UK was waking up too :-



Ah the good old days when al beeb was the BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION. Not the woke apology it is today!!
 
Factory hooters - T

Fog horns -

Air raid sirens -

Steam loco whistles - S

Not heard a factory hooter ever (as far as I can recall). I probably did but it was lost amongst the ambient noise pollution.

We still have fog horns around the UK. Both on land and on ships. Trinity House still maintains them. Many smaller boats are not required to have modern navigation devices; they either don't have them and/or don't really know how to use them. There was a big rumpus 4/5 years ago on Merseyside when the fog horns were used. A lot of people complained about the noise - seemingly they were unaware that a large port had some connection to shipping and boats.

Not heard an air raid siren for donkeys years (maybe late sixties?). Closest I got in recent years was living/working in Camberley and the escaped inmate alarm sounding at Broadmoor at 10am every Monday morning. Seemed a bit daft to me as that was obviously when a prisoner would time his escape for - the inmates were mental not stupid.

Only hear steam whistles on heritage railways nowadays. Very evocative sound, When I was a kid we used to stand on bridges and wave at the oncoming trains. If you were lucky the driver would give you a toot as he passed under and you vanished in a cloud of steam. I guess the extended neeee-nawwww from an air horn is the better modern equivalent.
 
We still have fog horns around the UK. Both on land and on ships. Trinity House still maintains them.
I'm not sure that they do. I'm talking about the bfo old school land-based foghorns, not those peepy short-range airhorns of the type you'd expect to hear at a football match. I think that there are one or two of the proper type that are maintained by heritage trusts and sounded on the occasional open day for tourists and visitors. AFAIK none are used operationally.

Apart from anything else, who would maintain and operate them? The lights are all automatic now and all the stations are unmanned and have been for many years. Many of the old fog horns are still in situ but are no longer operational.
 
I'm not sure that they do. I'm talking about the bfo old school land-based foghorns, not those peepy short-range airhorns of the type you'd expect to hear at a football match. I think that there are one or two of the proper type that are maintained by heritage trusts and sounded on the occasional open day for tourists and visitors. AFAIK none are used operationally.

Apart from anything else, who would maintain and operate them? The lights are all automatic now and all the stations are unmanned and have been for many years. Many of the old fog horns are still in situ but are no longer operational.
Local mongs move to the seaside, and moan.
 

TamH70

MIA
Not heard a factory hooter ever (as far as I can recall). I probably did but it was lost amongst the ambient noise pollution.

We still have fog horns around the UK. Both on land and on ships. Trinity House still maintains them. Many smaller boats are not required to have modern navigation devices; they either don't have them and/or don't really know how to use them. There was a big rumpus 4/5 years ago on Merseyside when the fog horns were used. A lot of people complained about the noise - seemingly they were unaware that a large port had some connection to shipping and boats.

Not heard an air raid siren for donkeys years (maybe late sixties?). Closest I got in recent years was living/working in Camberley and the escaped inmate alarm sounding at Broadmoor at 10am every Monday morning. Seemed a bit daft to me as that was obviously when a prisoner would time his escape for - the inmates were mental not stupid.

Only hear steam whistles on heritage railways nowadays. Very evocative sound, When I was a kid we used to stand on bridges and wave at the oncoming trains. If you were lucky the driver would give you a toot as he passed under and you vanished in a cloud of steam. I guess the extended neeee-nawwww from an air horn is the better modern equivalent.

They had hooters in that gurt big ICI plant in Stevenston, North Ayrshire, back when that was a thing.

It just struck me as very funny because of what they used to make there.

 

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