Memorable stuff from your formative years

giatttt

War Hero
I spent many happy nights listening to the news output on the BBC World Service - Radio Newsreel, News About Britain and the World News. And many unhappy mornings being hit or shouted at because my violent thug of a father was angry that I fell asleep without turning off my radio and the batteries died as a consequence.

Prick.

Then again, I did get to bury him, so there's that, I suppose.
I got dicked into burying my dad, my siblings don't really understand why I've not talked to my mum since. As her mum once said "they deserve each other".
 
I love those things, and so does my youngest grandson. Can't find them up here at all.
Look on Amazon, you'll find bound volumes of the originals (my #2 son has 3 of them - they helped get him into reading as a nipper, and he's saving them for his wee lad when the time comes). PM me if you want the titles/ ISBNs
 
shops starting to stock up on stuff for "halloween", which now seems to a big thing, as a youngster and even up to the '80's, I never remember any of this crap "trick or treating"
I blame Steven Spielberg and Hallmark cards.

Spielberg's E.T. made it 'A Thing', Hallmark latched on to it sharpish, other retailers/ marketeers seeing the way the wind was blowing, and how strongly, jumped on the bandwagon and All Hallow's Eve (The Day Of The Dead) is now the High Street's second biggest money-spinner, with Xmas just ahead, and Easter trailing behind by more than a length.
 
With the end of October approaching I am beginning to see shops starting to stock up on stuff for "halloween", which now seems to a big thing, as a youngster and even up to the '80's, I never remember any of this crap "trick or treating" it was just bonfire night & "penny for the guy" to buy the biggest banger or rocket you could get your hands on.
We were evil little sods & if we had a particularly grumpy neighbour who didn't cough up or moaned about us playing footie in the street, we had a devious plan get a banger, a length of string/cotton thread just long enough to reach from his door knocker/handle to a nearby window ledge, tie to aforesaid handle , stand by the door with a lighted fag, knock very hard, as soon as you heard him approaching, light fuse move away rapidly & watch as the door opened pulling the lighted banger off & see it explode close to said miserable old git & scare him out of his wits, that or just drop a banger through his letter box if their was no handy window ledge.
Other little tricks were to tie a jumping jack to a couple of feet of cotton attached to a bent pin, light fuse & attach pin to the jacket or pully of some unsuspecting kid of a rival gang & watch them try & get rid of it.
As we got slightly older one bright spark had the idea of using a bit of tubing as a rocket launcher, I had a pair of thick leather Don R gloves given to me by an uncle and a pair of old goggles, that and a scarf around my face protected me from the backblast as I pointed it at rival gangs around their bonfires. Oh what fun we had!
The one advantage of Halloween is that it shortens the Christmas shopping season. In the late 80s I worked for Morrisons and we would go in on the last Sunday in September (double time and the shop was shut) and set up our Christmas stocks. Working for another retailer remember putting Christmas cards out on 11th August 1995 (my Grandfathers birthday, and my last Christmas in retail before moving south). Twenty years ago my ex and I would watch out for the Famous Grouse adverts on the telly as an indicator that Christmas was coming. Earliest date? 1st July.

How much Christmas stuff is currently in the shops? Not a lot compared to 20 years ago. And that is because of the Halloween stuff cluttering up the seasonal aisles.

As for Halloween, while our lasses mother was still alive I had the misfortune of having to go to Portland, where she lived and the creepiest place in England, every Halloween. Not to see her try out her new broomstick but as it is my birthday the next day to collect my birthday card and present.
 
It's medium wave frequency was susceptible to atmospherics because the UK service was broadcast while the ionosphere was collapsing as solar radiation stopped charging it.

Ever tried HF after dark? I could pick up ships in the Channel easier than FHQ on the Plain (even when I was Squadron Leader's driver, parked next to FHQ). Thank &DEITY we got a VHF Command Net in BAOR.

To this day I think of Recce Squadron Command Net on the Plain in 1976-7, I hear one particular ship that couldn't be contacted. "Hello Eskimo Eskimo Eskimo this is..." ( but I can't remember the calling station's callsign.)

Niton Radio or Portishead?
 
Talking of wireless sets then.
In a previous professional life going out to work at daft o'clock, doing what was deemed necessary and then driving home around 6 am with a big smile on my face, having done it, and then watching the sun come up over a green and pleasant land.

Oh, and then listening to this while the rest of the working UK was waking up too :-

That was my wakeup call for many a year .
 
A pity that wake up became woke up!
Indeed .... even although I believe the medley of tunes reflected all parts of Great Britain ... it became too British and of course that had to end .... to me it was a tipping point for the BBC and what it represented

ETA I believe this is still played ... before the Shipping Forecast ... Sailing By ... time to settle down ....

 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Niton Radio or Portishead?
Quite possibly. I can still approximately remember the frequency it happened on, night after night, something like 2.185MHz (but after 45 years I can't be sure C13 went down that far). Why FHQ didn't change to a channel at the top end of C13's capability to mitigate this, I'll never know. But I was only a fresh out of Catterick nig operator. What did I know?

Besides, I was more keen on staying in contact with my peers than listening to some strawberry mivvy on "our" frequency.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Found this. My sort of era through to the mid 60s. I remember names on the programming rather than what they sounded like but the ads still ring bells.

View attachment 610100
Blimey, the names from the past! Jack Good went on to broadcast shows like ' 6.5 Special' and 'Oh Boy'. And hard to believe that Jack Jackson was once the font of all when it came to pop music. His Top Twenty show was huge.
 
Indeed .... even although I believe the medley of tunes reflected all parts of Great Britain ... it became too British and of course that had to end .... to me it was a tipping point for the BBC and what it represented

ETA I believe this is still played ... before the Shipping Forecast ... Sailing By ... time to settle down ....
Bit dusty here as well, BR...
But the ultimate BBC-wokeness irony is this...
The BBC Radio 4 UK Theme is an orchestral arrangement of traditional British and Irish airs compiled by Fritz Spiegl .
Austrian-born Spiegl moved to the UK as a refugee in 1939, after his parents fled Nazi persecution of Jews after the Anschluss.
So a bloke who knew all about persecution and oppression compiled the most British of British airs.

Equally 'woke' was the decision to drop "Lillibullero" as BBC World Service theme - some tosspots in London didn't realise it was THERE for the simple reason that it was so recognisable, and anyone in the far flung corners with a SW set would start scanning the airwaves at Hour:59:30 to find BBC World.
 
Indeed .... even although I believe the medley of tunes reflected all parts of Great Britain ... it became too British and of course that had to end .... to me it was a tipping point for the BBC and what it represented

ETA I believe this is still played ... before the Shipping Forecast ... Sailing By ... time to settle down ....

Two books I recommend, to do with radio of the past.
1634372045604.jpeg

1634372088259.jpeg


Maybe, some kind soul may have them in ebook format, and might send them to you?
*cough...cough*
 
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old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
It's a frequent chant of mine that I prefer radio to any other media ( other than books, possibly) and I'm constantly searching sites for semi forgotten gems. Just recently I located an entire series of 'The Life of Bliss' being the adventures and romances of George Bliss, played with the most wonderful Home Counties " anyone for tennis" accent by George Cole. Wonderful stuff, but terribly middle class and wouldn't at all do nowadays.
Similarly, I found some recordings of 'Workers Playtime' which was a daily variety show that was broadcast from a "factory somewhere in Britain" and proved to be a terrific launch pad for numerous new acts, as well as something of a crypt for some very old ones.
 
It's a frequent chant of mine that I prefer radio to any other media ( other than books, possibly) and I'm constantly searching sites for semi forgotten gems. Just recently I located an entire series of 'The Life of Bliss' being the adventures and romances of George Bliss, played with the most wonderful Home Counties " anyone for tennis" accent by George Cole. Wonderful stuff, but terribly middle class and wouldn't at all do nowadays.
Similarly, I found some recordings of 'Workers Playtime' which was a daily variety show that was broadcast from a "factory somewhere in Britain" and proved to be a terrific launch pad for numerous new acts, as well as something of a crypt for some very old ones.
What I have hated about the BBC for many years - back to cassette and record days - is that they have squillions of hours of archive stuff, which they weren't/aren't prepared to broadcast because it may offend certain viewers*, yet were/are happy to parcel it out and sell it on vinyl, cassette, video, DVD box sets etc

* - the list of the 'easily offended' must be getting longer every day. Or is this just a figment of the BBC woke imagination, and they play it overly-safe?
 
Bit dusty here as well, BR...
But the ultimate BBC-wokeness irony is this...
The BBC Radio 4 UK Theme is an orchestral arrangement of traditional British and Irish airs compiled by Fritz Spiegl .
Austrian-born Spiegl moved to the UK as a refugee in 1939, after his parents fled Nazi persecution of Jews after the Anschluss.
So a bloke who knew all about persecution and oppression compiled the most British of British airs.

Equally 'woke' was the decision to drop "Lillibullero" as BBC World Service theme - some tosspots in London didn't realise it was THERE for the simple reason that it was so recognisable, and anyone in the far flung corners with a SW set would start scanning the airwaves at Hour:59:30 to find BBC World.
By gum, it takes me back.
 
Two books I recommend, to do with radio of the past.
View attachment 610132
View attachment 610133

Maybe, some kid soul may have them in ebook format, and might send them to you?
*cough...cough*

Kindly thank your " friend " for that info ... however as a consequence of a Post on the " What are you reading right now ?" thread I have almost turned the house upside down looking for my copy of a book recently mentioned ... as a consequence I have re-discovered many old favourites to keep me going for a while ... however I have noted this Post .
 
Kindly thank your " friend " for that info ... however as a consequence of a Post on the " What are you reading right now ?" thread I have almost turned the house upside down looking for my copy of a book recently mentioned ... as a consequence I have re-discovered many old favourites to keep me going for a while ... however I have noted this Post .
I will so inform my 'friend' to be on the lookout for a PM .
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
What I have hated about the BBC for many years - back to cassette and record days - is that they have squillions of hours of archive stuff, which they weren't/aren't prepared to broadcast because it may offend certain viewers*, yet were/are happy to parcel it out and sell it on vinyl, cassette, video, DVD box sets etc

* - the list of the 'easily offended' must be getting longer every day. Or is this just a figment of the BBC woke imagination, and they play it overly-safe?
Yep, totally agree. Ok, 4Extra does go some way toward leavening this a tad, but nowhere near enough. If the BBC and it's censors would stop and think for a moment, the sort of stuff that we are talking about is mostly from the 1940s to 1959 era, and certainly is unlikely to appeal to the modern 'woke' feeling and caring ( in a very obvious way) Islington trendy. It's more likely to appeal to the crusty old buggers such as myself, whose sensitivities have been somewhat blunted over the years, aided in the blunting by spending time in wonderfully diverse and tolerant places such as the Middle East or Ulster.
 
It's a frequent chant of mine that I prefer radio to any other media ( other than books, possibly) and I'm constantly searching sites for semi forgotten gems. Just recently I located an entire series of 'The Life of Bliss' being the adventures and romances of George Bliss, played with the most wonderful Home Counties " anyone for tennis" accent by George Cole. Wonderful stuff, but terribly middle class and wouldn't at all do nowadays.
Similarly, I found some recordings of 'Workers Playtime' which was a daily variety show that was broadcast from a "factory somewhere in Britain" and proved to be a terrific launch pad for numerous new acts, as well as something of a crypt for some very old ones.
I have posted this before ... you need to visit Radio Echoes ..... it abounds with classic BBC Comedy shows ... amd all free ... I download and strore then transfer a necessary ... sound quality is normally good ... I have just discovered this morning " Likely Lads " ... linky ...

 

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