Memorable stuff from your formative years

The George is on the other side of the A4, the Bathampton Mill is the closest
Thanks... Bathampton,my best squaddie mate lost yet another house (Long garden down to the canal) due to divorce about 1 mile away.
 
I picked up a copy of the Empire Youth Annual (1951 I think) about 10 years ago.

Foreword by the Prime Minister of New Zealand saying that NZ wanted lots of white boys and girls to move there to grow food for the mother country. Lots of stories featuring the war and articles on food (rationing was still in force at the time) and plants. One story that I remember was about being a colonial administrator in Papua New Guinea and about arresting the locals.

I'd love to make the woke brigade read it and watch their heads explode.
 
Old Army joke.... "Look at that, that is disgusting".... pointing at someone shaving out of a fire bucket.... "Why is it disgusting"?...."Because I pissed in it last night".


Let the dog in this morning, bird patted his head, said "Oh, it's been raining"
I said "no, Ive just pissed out of the window"
 
I picked up a copy of the Empire Youth Annual (1951 I think) about 10 years ago.

Foreword by the Prime Minister of New Zealand saying that NZ wanted lots of white boys and girls to move there to grow food for the mother country. Lots of stories featuring the war and articles on food (rationing was still in force at the time) and plants. One story that I remember was about being a colonial administrator in Papua New Guinea and about arresting the locals.

I'd love to make the woke brigade read it and watch their heads explode.
Even better, get them to read "A Pattern Of Islands" by Sir Arthur Trimble, an excellent book about the colonial times in the Gilbert and Elice islands, pre-WW2.
It was required reading when I was in High School.
 

Chef

LE
I did a presentation in Kilburn (Close to Camden) in about 1970 at the age of 13(ish)about the Bismarck... including a 2 foot long model I had built and painted. God I was war-ry.
I'd have thought you'd have been nav-y.
 
Even better, get them to read "A Pattern Of Islands" by Sir Arthur Trimble, an excellent book about the colonial times in the Gilbert and Elice islands, pre-WW2.
It was required reading when I was in High School.


Was this where "long pig" was mentioned?
 
TBH, I cannot remember that.

I do however remember a section on getting very merry on Coconut toddy.



snip "Long pig is an antiquated term for human flesh, eaten by cannibals. Purportedly, the term long pig is a translation of a phrase used in the Pacific Islands for human flesh intended for consumption. Early explorers and missionaries who contacted cannibal Pacific Islanders were told that human flesh tasted similar to pork"
 

snip "Long pig is an antiquated term for human flesh, eaten by cannibals. Purportedly, the term long pig is a translation of a phrase used in the Pacific Islands for human flesh intended for consumption. Early explorers and missionaries who contacted cannibal Pacific Islanders were told that human flesh tasted similar to pork"
I have heard the term "Long Pig" before, just not sure if it was in that book or not.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I have heard the term "Long Pig" before, just not sure if it was in that book or not.
You might find it was in Stevenson's book 'Coral Island'. I have a vague memory of it from there . Or something similar, like 'Two Years Before the Mast'.
 
You might find it was in Stevenson's book 'Coral Island'. I have a vague memory of it from there . Or something similar, like 'Two Years Before the Mast'.


two good books along with dozens more of the adventurous sort, including the Biggles series, I read avidly as a young lad. I loved this one "Bevis: The Story of a Boy" by Richard Jefferies, about a young lad growing up in the country near Swindon and trying all sorts of non pc stuff, including making a gun. It inspired me to make a very rudimentary 410 shotgun with a piece of piping bound round with wire to stop it exploding, mounted & held down by several bricks behind the WW2 air raid shelter in our back garden, fired by hitting the percussion cap with a hammer & nail.
In the early '50's at 14, I could go into our local sports shop & buy a few 410 cartridges with my pocket money with NO questions being asked. I never hit anything and it was not exactly portable & only succeeded in scaring one of our neighbours!
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
two good books along with dozens more of the adventurous sort, including the Biggles series, I read avidly as a young lad. I loved this one "Bevis: The Story of a Boy" by Richard Jefferies, about a young lad growing up in the country near Swindon and trying all sorts of non pc stuff, including making a gun. It inspired me to make a very rudimentary 410 shotgun with a piece of piping bound round with wire to stop it exploding, mounted & held down by several bricks behind the WW2 air raid shelter in our back garden, fired by hitting the percussion cap with a hammer & nail.
In the early '50's at 14, I could go into our local sports shop & buy a few 410 cartridges with my pocket money with NO questions being asked. I never hit anything and it was not exactly portable & only succeeded in scaring one of our neighbours!
I was telling my 13 year old grandson about being able to buy cartridges without documents, just the other day. That anyone could buy a shotgun certificate from local post office for 10/- ( 50p) without any police involvement. And that even a FAC was easy to come by.
I remember the big Co-Op store in Newcastle, in the Bigg Market, with a floor devoted to sports equipment, including a long glass case on a counter filled with pistols and the racks of rifles and shotguns behind it. Don't ever recall anyone going postal with a firearm either.

Oh, and those books; loved them. I also had a favourite, The Kon Tiki Expedition, by Thor Heyedahl.
 
two good books along with dozens more of the adventurous sort, including the Biggles series, I read avidly as a young lad. I loved this one "Bevis: The Story of a Boy" by Richard Jefferies, about a young lad growing up in the country near Swindon and trying all sorts of non pc stuff, including making a gun. It inspired me to make a very rudimentary 410 shotgun with a piece of piping bound round with wire to stop it exploding, mounted & held down by several bricks behind the WW2 air raid shelter in our back garden, fired by hitting the percussion cap with a hammer & nail.
In the early '50's at 14, I could go into our local sports shop & buy a few 410 cartridges with my pocket money with NO questions being asked. I never hit anything and it was not exactly portable & only succeeded in scaring one of our neighbours!

I remember when Woolworth's had a section of classic children's books, including The Coral Island (R M Ballantyne, despite Stevenson's links with the Pacific) , Treasure Island, The Black Tulip, The Three Musketeers and a host of others. Some were definitely aimed at boys, others at girls. ( I still puzzle about the enigmatic title "What Katy Did Next".)

That was in the days before Biggles and Billy Bunter fell foul of the PC set.....along with Enid Blyton.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I remember when Woolworth's had a section of classic children's books, including The Coral Island (R M Ballantyne, despite Stevenson's links with the Pacific) , Treasure Island, The Black Tulip, The Three Musketeers and a host of others. Some were definitely aimed at boys, others at girls. ( I still puzzle about the enigmatic title "What Katy Did Next".)

That was in the days before Biggles and Billy Bunter fell foul of the PC set.....along with Enid Blyton.
Yes, my mistake. It was Ballantyne and not Stevenson. It was that book that made me want to make my fortune in copra. Even though I had no idea what it was then.
 
I was telling my 13 year old grandson about being able to buy cartridges without documents, just the other day. That anyone could buy a shotgun certificate from local post office for 10/- ( 50p) without any police involvement. And that even a FAC was easy to come by.
I remember the big Co-Op store in Newcastle, in the Bigg Market, with a floor devoted to sports equipment, including a long glass case on a counter filled with pistols and the racks of rifles and shotguns behind it. Don't ever recall anyone going postal with a firearm either.

Oh, and those books; loved them. I also had a favourite, The Kon Tiki Expedition, by Thor Heyedahl.

Somewhere safe I have a copy ... IIRC not a very big book but a fascinating read ... the Radio Operator on board the Kon Tiki was a Norwegian who had taken part in the famous raid , Operation Grouse / Gunnerside , on the Heavy Water Plant in Vermork
 

Latest Threads

Top