Memorable stuff from your formative years

Lots of river crossings were in control of the local land owner, or person who had the right to control the crossing. I’ve only seen them on the Thames, but I’m sure others exist. The order was often an act of parliament, much like canals, railways and turnpikes came into being.
I think many owners can extract a toll, though don’t.
There's one in Lincolnshire over a canal.
Something like 15p to cross which is bugger all, hence why it was used on Customs surveillance courses as all the cool kids used plastic and got roundly berated by us old dinosaur instructors that sometimes cash was king.
 
There's one in Lincolnshire over a canal.
Something like 15p to cross which is bugger all, hence why it was used on Customs surveillance courses as all the cool kids used plastic and got roundly berated by us old dinosaur instructors that sometimes cash was king.
one just south of Bath ..... quite quaint really...
 

PFGEN

GCM
The subject of the other famous picture of a burnt child from the Vietnam War did well

Wow is about all I can say to that. I remember seeing the picture in gramps' copy of National Geographic. Even as a kid I reckoned the people in the picture would have died. NG used to have some great articles and photos about Vietnam. Heartwarming that something good came out of it all. It certainly can't have been easy for her and that's putting it mildly.
 

Choux Bun

Old-Salt
10/- in the 60s? Coo you lot must've been loaded!

The taste of weak orange squash is something I remember from lots of official outings. Especially the Woodcraft Folk, which I'm surprised to find are still going.
Chef - I don't think we were loaded. My Dad was a miner (a Deputy - not sure what that equates to in today's money - but he carried a big stick (yardstick), used to measure the coal seams) and I suspect he paid in to the Miner's Welfare throughout the year to ensure my Sis and I's places on the annual trip - can't ask him as he died 3 yrs ago.
The annual trip was for around 200 kids, from local mining communities and was as described in my earlier post. Spoke to my sister this morning about this and the first thing she remembered was the crisp, clean ten bob note we all got and the weak orange squash. Our Mum came with us, but I don't think Dad ever did.
As kids our only other exposure to money was 1s and 3d pocket money (given each week, in thrupenny bits, for washing/drying up) and each Monday morning 10 bob (in half crowns, never a ten bob note) for school dinner money and school bank (a bit like Troop Subs in the Army - never knew what happened to it!!). Happy Days!!
 

Issi

LE
It was terrifying going up the sod in a coach. My T.A. Regiment did two annual camps in the old base in Scarborough, and the Sutton Bank expedition was the only thing I didn't like about them.
Would Sutton Bank be anywhere near Thirsk/Northallerton? And was there a cafe on top?

I visited a mate up there once, and he took me for a drive to a big hill with amazing views, but could never remember where it was.
 

PFGEN

GCM
Chef - I don't think we were loaded. My Dad was a miner (a Deputy - not sure what that equates to in today's money - but he carried a big stick (yardstick), used to measure the coal seams) and I suspect he paid in to the Miner's Welfare throughout the year to ensure my Sis and I's places on the annual trip - can't ask him as he died 3 yrs ago.
The annual trip was for around 200 kids, from local mining communities and was as described in my earlier post. Spoke to my sister this morning about this and the first thing she remembered was the crisp, clean ten bob note we all got and the weak orange squash. Our Mum came with us, but I don't think Dad ever did.
As kids our only other exposure to money was 1s and 3d pocket money (given each week, in thrupenny bits, for washing/drying up) and each Monday morning 10 bob (in half crowns, never a ten bob note) for school dinner money and school bank (a bit like Troop Subs in the Army - never knew what happened to it!!). Happy Days!!

We only ever saw a 10 bob note when gran would press one into our hands at Christmas or on birthdays.I reckon she must have worked for the SOE given the skills in passing said note. Didn't matter though the goons always knew that money would have changed hands and we were forced to hand it over at which point it vanished into the piggy bank to be saved for the holidays. The piggy banks started as flimsy affairs but as our lock picking skills improved they ended up as steel strong boxes with teeth on the money slot.

Pocket money was sixpence for a long time, two thrupenny bits. One of which was exchanged for white mice, sherbet saucers and maybe a sherbet dab at the local sweet shop. The rest went in the piggy bank to be saved up for an investment in Airfix.
 
We only ever saw a 10 bob note when gran would press one into our hands at Christmas or on birthdays.I reckon she must have worked for the SOE given the skills in passing said note. Didn't matter though the goons always knew that money would have changed hands and we were forced to hand it over at which point it vanished into the piggy bank to be saved for the holidays. The piggy banks started as flimsy affairs but as our lock picking skills improved they ended up as steel strong boxes with teeth on the money slot.

Pocket money was sixpence for a long time, two thrupenny bits. One of which was exchanged for white mice, sherbet saucers and maybe a sherbet dab at the local sweet shop. The rest went in the piggy bank to be saved up for an investment in Airfix.
Money boxes.
Possibly a Mediterranean thing, as I had them as a child in Malta and we bought them for our children when we lived south of Rome.
They were special. Made of clay in the form of a flat-based amphora, the only opening to the outside world was the crudely cut slot through which coins and notes passed - never to resurface until the box was full.
Then a hammer had to be applied to smash the box: very satisfying feeling, as you could then get your hands on your loot , minus a couple of bob retained by a parent with which to buy a new one.
 
Currently listening to a programme on R4 Extra ‘Eagle: the Space Age Weekly.
Immediately before it was a ‘Dan Dare’ from series 1.
At the boarding establishment approved for my secondary education, the Eagle was the only illustrated ‘comic’ permitted.
I was a paper boy when Eagle came out, Tue or Thur IIRC. Delivered three or four on the round, read it back to front by the end of the round, under the trees if it was raining.
 
I remember the coming of the supermarket to this green and pleasant land.

About 1959/60 I lived in MQ in Cove. A new shopping street was built in Farnborough (Kingsmead I think).

It had a "supermarket". Wow - we are in the space age. I think it was MacFisheries (although my memory may be letting me down there). It wasn't much bigger than a modern Metro/Express with maybe two or three aisles - but it was the future.

And now this green and pleasant land is covered by its massive ugly bastard descendants.

The evolution of the supermarket seems to have had more than its fair share of extinct species.

Apart from the aforementioned MacFisheries (who gave me my first ever "real" job stacking shelves during my 1969 summer holiday) extinct species include Safeway, Presto, Fine Fare, Gateway, Somerfield, Netto(?) and undoubtedly many, many more.
 
I remember the coming of the supermarket to this green and pleasant land.

About 1959/60 I lived in MQ in Cove. A new shopping street was built in Farnborough (Kingsmead I think).

It had a "supermarket". Wow - we are in the space age. I think it was MacFisheries (although my memory may be letting me down there). It wasn't much bigger than a modern Metro/Express with maybe two or three aisles - but it was the future.

And now this green and pleasant land is covered by its massive ugly bastard descendants.

The evolution of the supermarket seems to have had more than its fair share of extinct species.

Apart from the aforementioned MacFisheries (who gave me my first ever "real" job stacking shelves during my 1969 summer holiday) extinct species include Safeway, Presto, Fine Fare, Gateway, Somerfield, Netto(?) and undoubtedly many, many more.
I use to do "Shelves" for Safeway Edgware road in 1972, 39p/hour... got promoted and the dizzy heights of 42p/hr.
 

Chef

LE
Chef - I don't think we were loaded. My Dad was a miner (a Deputy - not sure what that equates to in today's money - but he carried a big stick (yardstick), used to measure the coal seams) and I suspect he paid in to the Miner's Welfare throughout the year to ensure my Sis and I's places on the annual trip - can't ask him as he died 3 yrs ago.
The annual trip was for around 200 kids, from local mining communities and was as described in my earlier post. Spoke to my sister this morning about this and the first thing she remembered was the crisp, clean ten bob note we all got and the weak orange squash. Our Mum came with us, but I don't think Dad ever did.
As kids our only other exposure to money was 1s and 3d pocket money (given each week, in thrupenny bits, for washing/drying up) and each Monday morning 10 bob (in half crowns, never a ten bob note) for school dinner money and school bank (a bit like Troop Subs in the Army - never knew what happened to it!!). Happy Days!!

I remember dinner money for me was 2/6 when I first went to primary school. My pocket money used to go up 3d a year on my birthday, I had a strong union, plus The Dandy and TV21 so I did ok.

My grand parents used to give me five bob when we went to visit, which wasn't too often as they lived in Stratford-on-Avon. Then it went up to ten bob!

Looking at pre-decimal money these days, a half crown is like a manhole cover, as for the sequins masquerading as 1/- well I ask you.

Outside our corner shop I quite often find coppers on the deck which the shopkeeper says are discarded by customers. Wouldn't have happened in my day.

Like yourself I don't think we were loaded but we were comfortable. Mind you a few years back I discovered, from a chance remark, that sometimes supper for four was actually supper for my sister and I and mum and dad didn't eat till breakfast.
 

TamH70

MIA
Would Sutton Bank be anywhere near Thirsk/Northallerton? And was there a cafe on top?

I visited a mate up there once, and he took me for a drive to a big hill with amazing views, but could never remember where it was.

Yeah, Sutton Bank seems to be halfway between Thirsk and Nunnington on the A170, and according to Bing Maps, there's a cafe near the top. It might be the one you remember, but I'm not sure.


The big hill and amazing views bit is spot on, though as I said I wasn't all that appreciative at the time.
 
Sutton bank, National Trust car park and centre at the top... aircraft without engines falling off the edge.
 

Issi

LE
Yeah, Sutton Bank seems to be halfway between Thirsk and Nunnington on the A170, and according to Bing Maps, there's a cafe near the top. It might be the one you remember, but I'm not sure.


The big hill and amazing views bit is spot on, though as I said I wasn't all that appreciative at the time.

Just had a look on google images and that’s the place.
Thanks for that.
 
All the way to Cardiff which had docks for sea type merchant shipping.

As opposed to Weston which my father assured us had a swimming pool refilled twice a day by the tide.

As if.


We occasionally were tempted to use these to cross from Newport to "Weston super mud" in the 40's/50's, but normally it was a coach trip to Barry Island.
A couple were used as minesweepers in WW1 and one was present at the Germans Grand fleet surrender in
Three of the fleet had been sunk at Dunkirk!

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I lived about 100 yds up on the right, from the Transporter bridge which was our gateway to the local park.
 

Chef

LE
Second highest tide in the world in the Severn estuary.

It goes up and it goes down.
It may well do but it goes nowhere near Weston-Super-Mare.

One of the best marketing ploys since Greenland changed its name from Chilly Island.
 

TamH70

MIA
Just had a look on google images and that’s the place.
Thanks for that.

No probs, bud. Happy to help.

... That hill may have been terrifying to go up in in a coach but I remember thinking at the time it'd be awesome to belt down on a mountain bike. Maybe why that cafe is also a bike-rental shop.

Maybe as mad an idea as doing the same on the Slochd Summit on the A9, although the worst part of that was the ride up to the top.
 

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