Memorable stuff from your formative years

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Citroen GS.

My first Flight Commander in Münster had one and we used to travel back to UK together to share costs.

Had hydropneumatic suspension which was quite revolutionary for its time. No need for a jack if you got a puncture, move a couple of levers and the guilty wheel would lift up and Bob’s your Mum’s brother.
We've done that too.
1957 Plymouth with 3 wheels.jpg
 
I have used Euthymol for years now. Whenever anyone borrowed it, it was spat out and declared vile, ensuring that the same tightwad never borrowed it again.
Every now and then it has disappeared from the shelves as the EU banned yet another ingredient.


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
Germoline ointment! Used to love that smell and...euthymol used to taste like it.
I used to like Victory-V sweets also... which had chloroform or something in them.
 
Germoline ointment! Used to love that smell and...euthymol used to taste like it.
I used to like Victory-V sweets also... which had chloroform or something in them.

If you liked Victory Vs I imagine, given your calling, that you also enjoyed sucking a fishermans friend.
 
My mother used to give my sister and I cod liver oil and orange juice. I hated it and it used to make me sick (no allergy tests in those days - but it seems I'm allergic to fish). The doctor told Mum to give me Virol instead. It was thick, sweet malt extract, I loved it. Can't get it now, but today you can pay a fortune for the jars/ceramic containers in antique shops.
The malt based sticky delight we got in Glasgow was iirc called Maltalene. Lovely stuff.
 
C'est le blaireau!! Merci, mon ami :thumleft:

Although quite why a frenchman would name his design after a Brit infantry shovel has me perplexed, as does the fact that - despite this - I couldn't recall the car's correct nomenclature! =-(

A work of art: a masterpiece of avoidable mechanical complexity containing myriad fastenings/components that were amenable only to the application of Citroen proprietary tools (thus ensuring outlandish servicing costs at properly licensed and equipped dealerships), but a lovely ride.
Isn’t blaireau French for badger? Admittedly, I still can’t see the connection.
 
C'est le blaireau!! Merci, mon ami :thumleft:

Although quite why a frenchman would name his design after a Brit infantry shovel has me perplexed, as does the fact that - despite this - I couldn't recall the car's correct nomenclature! =-(

A work of art: a masterpiece of avoidable mechanical complexity containing myriad fastenings/components that were amenable only to the application of Citroen proprietary tools (thus ensuring outlandish servicing costs at properly licensed and equipped dealerships), but a lovely ride.
I thought a whole plethora of stuff was deemed to be GS - General Service? So it might have been named after a spork or something equally baffling!
Seriously though, Citroën tend to make beautiful cars, with state of the art technology- which is often marketed far too soon. My brother loved his BX so much he bought two, each one failed.
We went to look at his first after a police visit. The fellow who bought it from a dealer had just abandoned it off a junction where it had broken down, having not even bothered to reregister it.
 
Friend of mine had a Rover 75 .... lovely car ... built like a Tank ... it too had freewheel .... and a manually adjusted accelerator control mounted by the steering wheel ...

Lovely looking cars, but as with all sit up and beg Rovers the reason you don't see too many of them out and about now is because the arses dropped out of them with rot. I don't know what tank you had in mind.
 
The tops of milk bottles being attacked by blue tits to get at the cream.
Pinching milk bottles from doorsteps, or from the back of the milk float, at about 4 am when making it back home at dawn.
Mum then being irritated because she had an extra bottle, and knew you had nicked one.
It was hardly the Brinks Mat robbery, mum!
 
Germoline ointment! Used to love that smell and...euthymol used to taste like it.
I used to like Victory-V sweets also... which had chloroform or something in them.
My Bold me too .... my mother used to make a mix of green soap and sugar to " draw " bites / spelks / cuts ( mainly on Knees ) it must have worked ... I am still here . There was another cough type of sweet ... rectangular with the corners cut off and the colour of sandstone ... I cannot remember the name which IIRC was stamped on every lozenge ? ... hot on the tongue ... not Fisherman'x Friends .

ETA ... after all that rambling they were Victory V .... senior moment ... the Ace always now up the sleeve .
 
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Well . . . . there was a problem with the HST Mk3 carriages, and folk "falling-out" of the doors . . . at speed . . . dying . . . :( .

Internal door handles had to be removed !!


I was told a story of a young lad who was travelling on an old style train many years ago, watching someone open the carriage door whilst the train was moving.
This door was being pushed close by the wind pressure on it, so the young lad thought that looked cool and he'd give it a go on his side of the carriage.

The young lad operated the latch and shat himself when the door instantly flew open wide (being reverse orientation of the opposite door) and turned the carriage into a wind tunnel, filling it with dust, litter and screams of the panicked.

He alighted at the next stop and made good his escape, but I think he's still troubled by it, judging by the sweating and giggling in equal measure in the retelling.
 
Every single train I went on in the sixties and seventies had a sign warning you not to lean out of the window.

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The signs were mostly white on BR green background.

Almost universally changed to DO NOT CLEAN SOOT OFF THE WINDOW"

Regarding the second bit, you might know that, we might know that but not everybody knows it. In North London many trains/stations have this sign:

View attachment 554922

What might seem blindingly obvious to any sane person is not obvious to the yoof who go train surfing. And frequently die falling off (it's a long way down!), hitting overhead gantries and getting
 
In the early 90’s when the IRA were targeting BFG plates NAAFI came out with a long term hire scheme on German plates to help with security, you could have any car as long as it was a Citroen BX.

We took them up on the offer as Mrs 06 was commuting from Iserlohn to Bielefeld daily she was also entitled to RPOD and associated increase in BFG fuel coupons.

For the first time in our careers we made a profit on the deal as the RPOD was greater than the hire and fuel costs. It also caused a degree of consternation when purchasing the monthly fuel coupons as the pay clerk had to tear pages of coupons from the big book.

The BX was excellent, cruised at 100 mph with little effort and was very comfortable, sad to have to hand it back, shocked the NAAFI a bit with the mileage we clocked up.
 
The Citroen BX was an astonishingly tough car. The diesels could do some mileage with little attention.
Indeed it was, ours kept going with no problems at all at over 3000 miles a week for 6 months with no servicing. We had asked NAAFI what to do about servicing and they said just run it for 6 months and then swap it for another car, little did they know just what the mileage would be.
 
cod liver oil and orange juice.
The chorus line of a Scots tune often belted out by 15 Para. recruits in the RAF Abington 101 Club.

" I said to Hairy Mary, the pride of the Gorbals, are ye dancin
No.....oooh. it's just the way I'm stannin
The cod liver oil and the orange juice "

It went on for several more verses, but you get the theme.
 

TamH70

MIA
The chorus line of a Scots tune often belted out by 15 Para. recruits in the RAF Abington 101 Club.

" I said to Hairy Mary, the pride of the Gorbals, are ye dancin
No.....oooh. it's just the way I'm stannin
The cod liver oil and the orange juice "

It went on for several more verses, but you get the theme.
Hamish Imlach refers:

 

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