Memorable stuff from your formative years

Just a small correction: the windows weren't glass

Just a small correction, the windows weren't glass they were mica, a clear mineral that forms in flat sheets. The reason they were fitted in strips was it's hard to get crystals big enough, but each cleaves easily into thin sheets.
If you lick mica panels very small flat crystals break off and hurt your throat. I used to have spare windows for paraffin heaters in the expens R & I at 7 sigs and would tell people not to do it, and then go to wherever what they were asking for was stocked and come back to be called a c*** by them almost without fail.
 

Mrs Slocombe

Old-Salt
Kids today don’t know they’re born re cars.
They usually start on the button & they get everything thrown in now. We had to spec everything. Even a N/S mirror was extra.
I had a Fiesta Popular plus. The ‘plus’ was a clock, apparently. The windscreen washers were a squirty pedal thing that you operated with your left foot.
Bloody kids!
God, I had one of them, with the tit on the floor. It very slowly started leaking, and the underlay started to rot and smell like a pond, only it happened so gradually I didn't notice until I gave a lift to a really fit bird and she told me.
 

TamH70

MIA
Garvies, Solripe (Dunn & Moore) and Robertson's (also possibly Struthers) ended up in a bottle return scheme to try and compete with Barrs in the 70s. All the bottles had a little Saltire embossed on the necks.
Struthers were definitely part of the bottle-deposit return scheme. They were one of the popular brands of tooth rot in Neilston.
 
6A5EAF45-F9D9-452B-94E7-8334B7C3AE4A.jpeg
 
View attachment 554718
This one? Citroën Dyane.
Nope.

One of my female friends in 6th Form years had one of them: there was a dead straight, slightly undulating stretch of road near us (southbound into Watford from Hatch End - ish?) where - if her car hit the first undulation at just the right speed, and she kept the speed constant, the suspension got into some kinda harmonic cycle, and it was like a tots fairground ride for the better part of a mile :-D

But - no - the car my mate had was more upmarket, mebbe aspiring to the nascent VW Golf market. By its looks it was very definitely a child of the DS fambly (and OBTW it had hydrolastic suspension), and was very aerodynamic, barely any wind noise even at high speed, but with nice curves, and none of the odd rearward angles of the Ami posted above by @Joker62 , nor the slightly 'I've been stepped on' look of the original DS.

I'm kinda wondering if it was a 'UK' only model :?
 
Well . . . . there was a problem with the HST Mk3 carriages, and folk "falling-out" of the doors . . . at speed . . . dying . . . :( .

Internal door handles had to be removed !!

I'm sure that was something to do with the carriage body flexing enough to release the catch. Passengers were blamed at first, but more incidents led to a proper investigation. Extra electric locks were fitted to stop that problem, with an indicator light in a box at the top of the door.

I don't think HST's had internal door handles. The last one I rode on I had to drop the window and use the outside handle, that was only a couple of years ago.
 
I think these were more reliable. Grandad and Granny used to go out every Sunday on one similar.

You very rarely see sidecars now.

View attachment 554721
My father used to ride between Basildon and Bletchley with my pregnant mother (with me) and my three year old sister on a bsa gold star 650 with a san remo double adult side car. After the last return trip the funny feeling was due to the bike and side car beginning to come apart. That was when my mother went into labour. You really wouldn't do that now.
 

PFGEN

GCM
The tops of milk bottles being attacked by blue tits to get at the cream.

Saving the bottle tops and silver paper from the fag packets for the blind dogs. Always wondered what a blind dog wanted with silver paper when our dog took no interest at all in the stuff.

Discovered later that it all went to Guide Dogs for the Blind.
 

TamH70

MIA
Donating money at Primary Skool used to be called, and I quote - no wah - "giving to the Black Babies". And those capitals were emphasised in spoken Scots-English.
 
Nope.

One of my female friends in 6th Form years had one of them: there was a dead straight, slightly undulating stretch of road near us (southbound into Watford from Hatch End - ish?) where - if her car hit the first undulation at just the right speed, and she kept the speed constant, the suspension got into some kinda harmonic cycle, and it was like a tots fairground ride for the better part of a mile :-D

But - no - the car my mate had was more upmarket, mebbe aspiring to the nascent VW Golf market. By its looks it was very definitely a child of the DS fambly (and OBTW it had hydrolastic suspension), and was very aerodynamic, barely any wind noise even at high speed, but with nice curves, and none of the odd rearward angles of the Ami posted above by @Joker62 , nor the slightly 'I've been stepped on' look of the original DS.

I'm kinda wondering if it was a 'UK' only model :?
BX?
 
Saving the bottle tops and silver paper from the fag packets for the blind dogs. Always wondered what a blind dog wanted with silver paper when our dog took no interest at all in the stuff.

Discovered later that it all went to Guide Dogs for the Blind.
It was blind dogs for the guides actually a charity I still support.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Saving the bottle tops and silver paper from the fag packets for the blind dogs. Always wondered what a blind dog wanted with silver paper when our dog took no interest at all in the stuff.

Discovered later that it all went to Guide Dogs for the Blind.
Earlier bottle tops were cardboard with little push out circles in the middle. Females used to collect such tops to make decoration balls by winding wool round them somehow. I always thought they were great chewed up and stuffed into keyholes.
 
Earlier bottle tops were cardboard with little push out circles in the middle. Females used to collect such tops to make decoration balls by winding wool round them somehow. I always thought they were great chewed up and stuffed into keyholes.
Indeed correct my sisters used to do that ... in the style of the linky below ;;;

 
Garvies, Solripe (Dunn & Moore) and Robertson's (also possibly Struthers) ended up in a bottle return scheme to try and compete with Barrs in the 70s. All the bottles had a little Saltire embossed on the necks.
Jings, that takes me back. Robertson's Ginger Beer was my favourite, much better than the Schweppes.
 
Wow. I had forgotten all about that.

Even as a yoof it amazed me that the country that invented the railway, built most of the world's railways and prided itself in engineering could come up with something as daft as that.

My guess is that it was some sort of security thing to stop people easily opening the doors and jumping out.

Odd that when they put handles on the inside nobody ever did.
And the windows in the carriages were lifted and dropped by a very thick leather belt, which used punched holes over a steel button to fix at the desired height. Iirc, there were no warning notices telling passengers not to stick their heads out of the windows, because it was fucking dangerous and everybody knew it.
 

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