Memorable stuff from your formative years

My Crikey! If I had known of their existence, I would have nagged my parents for years.
It appears that there are forums full of enthuasists for these beasts.
Another project-gonna build one-added to the pile! I wonder if hexamine could be used as replacement fuel? Hmmm... (cue explosive experiments x many).


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
I was aware of the Jetex system ( there were adverts in comics) but they were out of my pocket money range. Rubber band powered balsa aircraft were just about affordable.

I do remember a friend who had a control-line model aircraft with a powerful little petrol engine. He was showing it off to a group of us in a field and after a few minutes the novelty wore off of watching it going round and round. He landed it, tried to re-start the engine by flicking the prop, and misjudged it; the prop whacked into his finger, badly cutting it and spraying us with blood.

Typically cruel kids, there was little sympathy for him and I got a huge telling off from my mother for the impressive bloodstain across my T-shirt.......
 
Pantries. This is a pic of the house I lived in from1954 to 1959 (I was 5-10 years old at the time).

The small extension on the left consisted of two rooms. The room in front was the coal hole which contained coal. Coal was the only form of heating we had.

The room in the back was the pantry. It was the room where we stored everything that nowadays would be kept in the fridge (butter, meat anything that needed to be kept cool).

The reason we didn't keep stuff in the fridge is because we didn't have one...

View attachment 553482

Pedant headgear on: That would be the larder or dairy. Larder for 'wet' goods; milk, cheese, meat etc. Pantry, as in panna or pain, for 'dry' goods; bread, grain, nuns' fannies etc. Apols.


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 
When we were in the fifth form a whole bunch of us would go to the park behind The Jolly Friar, Basildon. One of the crowd had a full 'tache at 16 and coupled with a posh, non-standard black blazer, sans badge, could buy beer at the offy.
Then we'd set about the play equipment - Witches hat, fully loaded including a couple of girls; off the post. Swings, with death dismounts as high as you could, trying to avoid the iron railings around the flower beds. We could get the horse to go to the top of it's mounts, can't remember if it went over the top. On one occasion a guy called Pete, in the front position got out of sync and headbutted the cast iron horses head. Blood everywhere from a Mercedes Benz badge shaped cut on his forehead, he's probably got the scar today, Christ knows how he didn't crack his skull, the school nurse patched him up and I don't think they even sent him for an x-ray.
We were supposed to be a Grammar Technical school, but it was Basildon.
 
When I was10-ish I didn't eat a lot and my Mum was worried enough to take me to the Doc to see if there was anything wrong with me.

He prescribed a small glass of dry sherry every day before I had my tea.
As a small child I was diagnosed as anaemic & the doctor prescribed a small amount of port every night. All went well until my mother went out one night and left my father in charge. "How much port do you have son" When my mother got home I was upside down in bed and completely shit faced. been drinking heavily ever since.
 
Collecting car badges was a thing for a while I/ we had a lot. Obviously the rarer the better, Good job I could run. A proper hiding would have been well deserved.
Big screw driver was the key. No excuses for that very embarrassing 1979 I think 12/13. Well before the beastie boys.
 
Collecting car badges was a thing for a while I/ we had a lot. Obviously the rarer the better, Good job I could run. A proper hiding would have been well deserved.
Big screw driver was the key. No excuses for that very embarrassing 1979 I think 12/13. Well before the beastie boys.

Blimey. We used to do that as well.

But only to Mercs.

You would nick the MB mascot (? dunno if that's the correct word) cut off the three prongs and screw the remaining circle into a walking stick.

All of us cubs and scouts on Osnatraz had Merc walking sticks when we went traipsing around the Vaterland.

Facknose how this craze started but there must have been some pretty pissed off Boxheads around.

I looked on it as payback for dropping an incendiary bomb on my granddads house (which fortunately bounced off the roof into the garden).
 
Jones lemonade, made in Bishop Auckland I think & Tudor crisps.
Grays pop was made in Spennymoor and delivered to West Auckland on a Sunday. Jones was the smaller company and was originally Bishop Auckland based before moving to St. Helen Auckland. The Jones wagon used to deliver on a Friday.

Interesting story that I heard about Jones Lemonade. One of the family was killed on Operation Chastise and Barnes Wallis either helped to found the company or provided financial assistance. I can't verify that although it was a well known story in the 70s and 80s. I don't think that anyone called Jones was killed on the raid but that doesn't necessarily mean anything. Dad told me that the Northern Echo reported that the family had attended the premiere of The Dam Busters in London. Again, I've no idea how true the story is.
 
Having posted about nicking Mercedes mascots I now know they are called figureheads rather than mascots/badges (or hood ornaments to the Septics).

Which are again memorable things from my youth. Some cars had magnificent figureheads - the Rover Viking springs to mind.

Doing a Google search I can't help but think how many people must have been disemboweled by elaborate pointy metal figureheads ripping out their innards.

 
Having posted about nicking Mercedes mascots I now know they are called figureheads rather than mascots/badges (or hood ornaments to the Septics).

Which are again memorable things from my youth. Some cars had magnificent figureheads - the Rover Viking springs to mind.

Doing a Google search I can't help but think how many people must have been disemboweled by elaborate pointy metal figureheads ripping out their innards.


My father had an A30 Countryman with the distinctive flying A figurehead which doubled, as I remember it, as a handle to unlock the bonnet.

Other Austins had similar devices, and as a youngster I remember being told of a young farm labourer being hideously injured as a result of travelling on the cab roof of an Austin pick-up truck. The driver braked, he slid forward and lost his family jewels. The story may well have been apocryphal, but I never, ever, was tempted to ride on the roof!
 
My father had an A30 Countryman with the distinctive flying A figurehead which doubled, as I remember it, as a handle to unlock the bonnet.

Other Austins had similar devices, and as a youngster I remember being told of a young farm labourer being hideously injured as a result of travelling on the cab roof of an Austin pick-up truck. The driver braked, he slid forward and lost his family jewels. The story may well have been apocryphal, but I never, ever, was tempted to ride on the roof!

A mere trifle for the Purple Emperor and Chaz Darwin on a day out.
 
That curry powder would be the ubiquitous Vencatachellum stuff in the blue tin (well, cardboard tube sort of thing).

It used to be my job to cook the Sunday evening curry for my parents and myself.

Take all the leftovers from the Sunday roast. Put into stock made from two OXO cubes (chicken or beef, depending on meat). Add X teaspoons of curry powder. Boil to buggery. Serve with seriously overcooked long grain rice. Added fripperies to include any of the following: dessicated coconut, raisins, chopped apples.

Living high on the hog (in 1967).

The horror, the horror (in 2021).
Raisins, apples and coconut in curry! Jesus, I had forgotten all about those essential ingredients.
 
Toffee hammer? What ten year old ever had a toffee hammer or even knew that such things existed? Even if they did, it wouldn't have put a dent in a slab of McCowan's Highland Toffee at ambient temperature any time between March and November.
The "penny chews", known by their proper name Dainty. Hence my sister's disparaging description of a girl in her class she didn't like, "she has a face like a half-chewed Dainty"
 
Having posted about nicking Mercedes mascots I now know they are called figureheads rather than mascots/badges (or hood ornaments to the Septics).

Which are again memorable things from my youth. Some cars had magnificent figureheads - the Rover Viking springs to mind.

Doing a Google search I can't help but think how many people must have been disemboweled by elaborate pointy metal figureheads ripping out their innards.

This s the only proper figurehead for a boy. Hernando De Soto! His face lights up when the lights are turned on after dark.

1950 De Soto hood ornament with light inside -2 (2).jpg
 
My father made magnificent Curry meals ... he was deep sea MN pre , during and post WW2 . Eighteen month sailings were not unusual …. I hope he really did go to sea … anyway he would come back on shore with spices he had bought and make his own Curry Powder mix … the result was a pale yellow coloured Curry with a magnificent taste … we had a cat which also loved his Curry … it would eat some and then step back to cool its mouth down but always go back for more .
 
I really hesitate before posting this.

@Fang_Farrier may well wish to avoid it completely.





WARNING







The stuff below may well initiate severe PTSD/Flashbacks of unprecedented horror, and memories of excruciating pain.



I give you















DENTISTRY OF THE 1950S







The nausea and ringing in the ears as you re-surfaced afterwards, with the horrible taste of blood in your mouth, AND THE HUGE FUCKING GAP WHERE YOUR TOOTH USED TO BE.


I still have nightmares.
More disconcerting, was coming out of the "gas" going for a piss and finding your Y fronts are on back to front when you know for a fact they weren't when you went "under"
 
Isn’t it something to do with people not giving dogs bones as much nowadays? They give them expensive dry food instead.
Just got a pup (Lottie, bearded collie #3 for us - a delightful breed, let me tell you). #1 and #2 were fed on dried, latest is on raw meat, on advice from the breeder. Apparently science has moved on, and - funny old thing - dogs do better on good quality meat.
 
many people must have been disemboweled by elaborate pointy metal figureheads ripping out their innards
Outlawed by EU rules at some point in the 1980s, I think. Merc badges were (for a while, at least) mounted on kinda ball-and-socket so they'd at least fold back when impacted by a small child or geriatric en route to the tarmac via windscreen and roof.

The sticky-up leaping Jaguar was immeidately dispensed with, in favour of the (rather less ostentatious) badge used today.
 

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