Memorable stuff from your formative years

Lacking Moral Fibre

War Hero
Book Reviewer
I remember a similar problem with cats and scared them off with exploding pellets from my .22 Crossman. I used to carefully powder Swan Vesta match heads and pack it in to the pellets with a bit of tissue and blob of glue to keep it all in place. Wait till cat was walking past something hard and shoot. Nice crack as the pellet struck hard surface making cat leg it. Fed up with grinding down match heads I then put fins on the matches and seated them on a wad of tissue to fire them. This was better as there was a flash as well!
Wow every days a school day!
 
And oil.

On any decent journey my first car used as much oil as it did petrol.

My first car - a sit-up-and-beg Ford Popular - had a sidevalve engine with knackered piston rings. It, too, needed a generous supply of oil. It cost about five shillings a gallon, whereas the petrol was only four and ninepence a gallon.
I was told that when I drove down Leighton Buzzard High Street it produced a fair imitation of a destroyer laying a smokescreen.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I remember a similar problem with cats and scared them off with exploding pellets from my .22 Crossman. I used to carefully powder Swan Vesta match heads and pack it in to the pellets with a bit of tissue and blob of glue to keep it all in place. Wait till cat was walking past something hard and shoot. Nice crack as the pellet struck hard surface making cat leg it. Fed up with grinding down match heads I then put fins on the matches and seated them on a wad of tissue to fire them. This was better as there was a flash as well!
I just broke the match head with maybe ¼" of wood, inserted into the hollow of the round and loaded the round backwards so it was like a HEAT round. I also discovered that dipping in glue made it more explosive than incendiary.
 
I remember a similar problem with cats and scared them off with exploding pellets from my .22 Crossman. I used to carefully powder Swan Vesta match heads and pack it in to the pellets with a bit of tissue and blob of glue to keep it all in place. Wait till cat was walking past something hard and shoot. Nice crack as the pellet struck hard surface making cat leg it. Fed up with grinding down match heads I then put fins on the matches and seated them on a wad of tissue to fire them. This was better as there was a flash as well!
Fin stabilised discarding sabot. Excellent. Learned from the weapons section of this training manual perchance? (Just don't look at the date.)

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There was a version in a pink tin as well...!

I think you are being a bit harsh.. Curry made with Vencatachellum powder (which was basically what is still known as Garam Masala in India..) did make a reasonable facsimile of the curry that would have been served to the British in the last days of the Raj. The closest example of this type of curry is the traditional mess curry which managed to survive in the original form up until the 90s..

There was a curry shop in Edinburgh called Kushdies by the University which predated the 60s/70s curry shops that are based on stir fried curries made to a modern formula. The curries were basically spiced stews which were very similar to mess curry.

"Modern" curries tend to be based on Mugul/Bagladeshi styles of cooking from the Punjab. Raj type curries tended to be based on more southern styles of cooking, with more rice and less wheat/breads. It was very popular in the UK from the 1890s up until WW2 when most of UK cooking got trashed.
Most 'Indian' curry houses are Bangladeshi (formerly East Pakistan) run in my experience and quite a few don't have alcohol licenses (which ruins the classic combo of a curry and a lager). That means the style of cooking is northern in the main. Where's the variety from what is a culinary diverse region? I have to travel for anything different- good Thai places in Cirencester and Cheltenham and a good Nepali in Gloucester. Good job I can cook.
 
On a nice sunny day, the road to Skegness was littered with broken down cars (a lot of Austin 1100's I seem to remember).
SOP before any long journey was to put several gallons of water in the boot to fill up the radiator.

I remember the roads to Devon & Cornwall having the same scenes.
 
Mid 1950s, someone must have told my mother about some foreign stuff called curry. She bought curry powder.
I must have been in my early 20s before I discovered at an Indian restaurant in Luton that curries could be more than curry-flavoured mince served with boiled potatoes. Having said that, I used to enjoy Mum's curries.......
You must be the wifes brother. Her mother was still serving curried mince until she passed away a few years back. Bright yellow mince, not recommended.
 
That and Racasan for the Elsan lavvy.

Went to buy a car from a woman in Northampton, didn't as you could see the road under the floor mats. She had a half-cast son about 6 years old running about in the garden. Getting annoyed she called him.

"Elsan, come here now!!!"

Me and the missus just made it back to the car before dissolving in laughter.
Must have been forty years ago, Elsan is still remembered, poor little sod.
 
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RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Vesta Curry - with boil in the bag rice.

The height of daring foreign cuisine in 1974
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And oil.

On any decent journey my first car used as much oil as it did petrol.

In the early 80's the missus had a huge Vauxhall Victor estate that she used to tow a horse box.
It appeared to have a total loss oil system.
It used so much oil a couple of gallon cans were required for a long run.
She used to get it from the local garages waste oil drum.
In the end it was scrapped off for corrosion problems, never missed a beat.
 
In the early 80's the missus had a huge Vauxhall Victor estate that she used to tow a horse box.
It appeared to have a total loss oil system.
It used so much oil a couple of gallon cans were required for a long run.
She used to get it from the local garages waste oil drum.
In the end it was scrapped off for corrosion problems, never missed a beat.
That sounds like the Vauxhall Victor!

Edited to add: But they did a nice bright red job, when most other cars seemed to be black.
 

RedDinger

War Hero
With kids hanging of the side of the wagon ready to drop off...
Reminds me of potato picking season, when the farmer would pick up dozens of kids every day on his trailer. No sign of health and safety back then.
 
With kids hanging of the side of the wagon ready to drop off when it stopped & run up the path with the bottles.
Our pop man had a Bedford TK with ‘phuteew’ gear changes.
I remember the pop wagons had a low-slung look about them. They were made like that to keep the c of g low.
 
If you were ill, you were sometimes allowed Lucozade. But only a very small glass! Too much Lucozade was bad for you.

Nothing to do with the stuff being pricey.
I liked looking through the yellow cellophane wrapper. The bottle had little glass pimples on it.
 
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