Memorable stuff from your formative years

TV ?! . . . You had a TV ?! . . . LUXURY !! ;) .

The Saturday mornings, of my formative years were spent listening to Uncle Mac, and such serious music as this . . . .
 
TV ?! . . . You had a TV ?! . . . LUXURY !! ;) .

The Saturday mornings, of my formative years were spent listening to Uncle Mac, and such serious music as this . . . .
 
I remember posting this on another thread . . . but it deserves an other airing . . . ;) !!

 

TamH70

MIA

tiv

LE
This is a fitted type, other models existed, and I got the spelling wrong, it should have been Rayburn. I think Parkray was another manufacturer of them though. They both did kitchen ranges as well.


View attachment 553555
After a bit of searching and coffee I found this. The door glass is in strips as I remember and it's a Parkray though I don't remember it having the knob bottom right.

vintage parkray coal or wood fire with glass door
 
Always got a couple of boxes for emergencies,to go with the box of candles.

Sad I know but,it's a left over from the early 70's, when the power cuts were unpredictable ! ;-)
Now that's something from our formative years I don't miss. Remember taking a bath by candle light? How we were taught to stick the candles in a bowl when going to bed and to make sure we put water in the bowl so we didn't burn the house down in the middle of the night?
 
I posted this in a different thread but it probably belongs here.

I bet the only memorable shop in most peoples minds that is still in existence and trading the same is the local butchers.

They seem to be the single most durable/enduring retail outlets on any high street.

Where I live now the two butchers are the only remaining shops from decades ago (although the small town lost its tripe and heel shops many years ago). All the others have changed usage.

I was looking around the small shopping centre near where I grew up and the only original shop from my youth is the butchers.

Screenshot (44).png


Been there for about a hundred years. The website says they are only 60+ years old but they were Tupper Bros. before the current name (there was a family bust up of some sort) and my granny was using them in 1926 when she moved to a new house nearby. My granny claimed that Tuppers sausages got the family through WWII (although other people claimed they were truly mystery bags).

There used to be adverts in American comics from the sixties urging the yoof to become butchers as "you will never be out of work". Seemingly a reasonable claim, although most comic reading spods would have preferred to be an astronaut.
 
View attachment 553548 I remember sharing these with my grandmother while watching Crown Court in the 70’s. Well sharing isn’t correct as her dentures would clog up and I’d eat the rest.
And this stuff, although there was a fair chance it would also remove all of your fillings . . . Which most kids had.
1614602648638.png
 
Scraping the ice off the inside of the single glazed, aluminium framed windows in the morning. Aluminium is an excellent heat conductor.

Perfect for single glazed windows.

relive Remembering to put a candle in a jar under the high level cistern of the outside toilet to prevent it freezing. more importantly remembering to light the candle...
Living in ex wwll prefab
(Grandfather Bootle GP bought half a dozen for £50 apiece) until 1998, certainly helped re live
'The Good Old Days'
 
If they are just ordinary 40W bayonet fitting Amazon has plenty but they are a bit steep in price. They call the traditional filament type "rough service".

Rough Service or RS lamps are tougher and more durable than normal lamps. They are meant for things like those hand held inspection lamps with a wire mesh, machinery or anything that might get knocked about a bit or suffer vibration.
 

RedDinger

War Hero
After a bit of searching and coffee I found this. The door glass is in strips as I remember and it's a Parkray though I don't remember it having the knob bottom right.

vintage parkray coal or wood fire with glass door
These exact ones were fitted in all the Coal Board houses where I grew up. Everyone got free coke to burn in them.
You pulled/pushed the knob on the side with a special tool, to shake the ashes into the holder at the bottom.
 

tiv

LE
These exact ones were fitted in all the Coal Board houses where I grew up. Everyone got free coke to burn in them.
You pulled/pushed the knob on the side with a special tool, to shake the ashes into the holder at the bottom.
Thanks, I'm wondering if there was one now and I've forgotten. Do remember the tool you mentioned, lifted the front off and formed the handle to the ash pan IIRC.

My parents brought coke from the Gas Company. They had a book of post cards to order the stuff with and the last but one was blue which caused a new book to be sent. Had to be quick when the delivery happened as the outbuilding where the bunkers were had a low ceiling and if you didn't get the bulbs out sharpish the sacks could catch and break them.
 
A perfectly harmless (for once) and innocuous memory just flitted into my head.

Circa 1959-62 I used to walk to school in Cove. On a frosty winter morning the spiders webs in the bushes would freeze up and look like a silver filigree made by a magic jeweler.

If you got a small stick and bent it into a loop you could collect the spiders web on it. You ended up with something resembling a miniature tennis racket or snowshoe. Very pretty to look at but no rhyme nor reason for doing it.

A quick Google image search showed no pictures of this so I assume kids no longer do it.

Certainly a lot less damaging to nature than my mother and her childhood friends sticking a straw up a frogs arse and inflating it.
 
A perfectly harmless (for once) and innocuous memory just flitted into my head.

Circa 1959-62 I used to walk to school in Cove. On a frosty winter morning the spiders webs in the bushes would freeze up and look like a silver filigree made by a magic jeweler.

If you got a small stick and bent it into a loop you could collect the spiders web on it. You ended up with something resembling a miniature tennis racket or snowshoe. Very pretty to look at but no rhyme nor reason for doing it.

A quick Google image search showed no pictures of this so I assume kids no longer do it.

Certainly a lot less damaging to nature than my mother and her childhood friends sticking a straw up a frogs arse and inflating it.

No wonder the French hate us.
 
I relive the coal fire days every fecking day during the winter months. We've just stopped our daily coal fires until the winter comes around again.
You soon get pissed off raking out the ashes every morning but it's well worth having a nice hot fire every evening.
 

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