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  1. Just posted this over in the Health and Fitness forum and was advised to repost here.

    I need an honest assessment of my chances/suitability for the army.

    Have been on Cipralex (anxiety medication), lowest dose for just over a year. Got help because I was feeling teary all the time. No apparent trigger. Worked brilliantly within a fortnight. My doctor said I needed to stay on it at least 6-8 months. Aiming to see about coming off it in January after my driving test. Have also become very aware of stressful situations and negative thought patterns at work and in life and have developed some useful coping techniques.

    As I've been on it longer than the minimum, will that mean I'd have to have a longer 'clean' period? An RAF officer I spoke to a while back at a event said I'd be looking at needing to be clear 1-5 years. I'm 25 and want to join the Intelligence Corp so in 5 years I'd be too old.

    I'm a graduate with 4 years of life in the 'real world' so I'm not too worried about the BARB or the paper side of my application. My reason for joining is to do a job with meaning, make lifelong friends, travel, possibly learn a language.

    Anybody got in under similar circumstances? Anyone rejected? Anyone with valid doubts about me even applying?

    I asked the Online Careers Advice on the official site. They just told me I'd discuss it when I apply- but there doesn't seem to be any point applying if I'm ineligible, even once I'm off it.

    What should I do?
     
  2. Best place to go is the Careers Office. At least that way you'll get up to date info from the horses mouth. If I was you I'd go to a careers office in another town and wander in for some advice. Then if they said you were ok I'd go to my local one and enlist. You'll get advice on here but some of it although well intentioned may be out of date. Best of luck.

    Effy
     
  3. Careers office folk are not likley to be able to give you and accurate answer unless they speak to a mil medical type. It is the kind of decision a mil Occ Health doc or nurse would need to discuss with you himself, but I am not sure how you would best go about getting the info. I'll ask around - and if I find anything I'll try and get back in the next week

    Peeby.
     
  4. Only an educated guess, but I'd say that you will need to be symptom-free and off medication for at least a year before they will consider your application to join. You will probably need to see a service psychiatrist who will make a final recommendation on suitability. This will be arranged by the careers office if they want to proceed your application.

    Your medical history might cause a few furrowed brows from the point of view of vetting and the Int Corps. Be prepared to be flexible.

    PS Dont waste money on private psychiatrists or assessments. They wont take it as proof of fitness.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. Hi,

    I am in a similar place to you my friend. I have been rejected to the Navy and the way it is looking now, probably to the Army as well. If you want to join the Int. Corps then I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news but you can't join with a history of psychiatric illness. My careers Sergeant wanted me to go for it after I did my BARB but when we looked up on the computer it said that no one would be accepted to the Int. Corps who had a history of psychiatric illness. Trust me, even as much as talking to the doctor about mood instability qualifies you for the title of "history of psychiatric illness".

    Sorry, I know this isn't what you wanted to hear and you'll probably be devestated. I know, I've been there before. Just keep the ol' chin up and don't let it get you down.
     
  6. Cheers for that. I've been trying to tell myself that I and anyone in my team would be better off with me out. I'd love the job but no office experience would ever prepare me for a combat situation. I have to accept that that small bit of the brain the produces the old calming chemicals is a bit wonky...even if its easily fixed by medication.

    Is there any other ways that people in a similar situation have found they can 'do their bit'? I suppose the most obvious thing would be as an ACF instructor. Anyone got any alternative ideas?

    Many thanks,

    Fluffy.