Medical Question: Duff Shoulder rules me out

Discussion in 'Army Reserve' started by nqemt-p, Dec 14, 2008.

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  1. Hey all,

    I applied to join an RLC-TA specialist unit a couple of months ago and just got a letter saying that I'm rejected on medical grounds, due to having dislocated my shoulder 3 times in the past.

    Can anyone tell me if a shoulder op to tighten the ligaments would allow me to join? Afterall, its an operation with a high success rate for a common enough sports injury. Is this the end of the line for me or should I try applying again after the operation?

    I'm also hoping to go regular with the RAF in a couple of years. I presume that the medicals are virtually the same for all of the forces, so am I scuppered there as well? :cry:

    Cheers,
    nqemt-p
     
  2. I've done my right shoulder a good 3+ times. Always a forward dislocation. Had the op to tighen the ligaments a couple of years ago now. On the medical the doctor just looked at the rules, think it was a couple of dislocations and 1 repair op are allowed. Either way a couple of mobility tests and signed off as ok. I'd get it done anyway just for yourself only down side would be the 9 inch scar and most likey ending up with one shoulder lower than the other! lol! (true btw) :D
     
  3. Thanks KeeBaab,

    Yeah, I'm going to see a shoulder specialist in the new year and see what they say. As you suggest, I'll probably get it done for my own sake but will try another application afterwards. The worst they can do is say no a 2nd time.

    9 inch scar sounds nasty, was expecting a neat little keyhole scar. My shoulder is already lower than the other one though, I've done a right proper job on it. A bit late to see some common sense though! :oops:
     
  4. OOOooh!

    30 years ago, a rejection on physical grounds actually meant that you were too "fick".

    How times have changed... ;)
     
  5. Did they mean physical as in dense? :D
     
  6. Just being honest, here.

    The infantry has never been known for requiring particularly clever soldiers. Just those who are trainable.

    If we had an applicant who was, shall we say, a little bit below the mental standard that we'd prefer, we'd advise him that his feet weren't suitable for the Infantry and pass him on to the RAOC (now RLC) next door.

    No point in totally wasting someone who's keen.
     
  7. And the RAOC would send their rejects to the RA.

    And the RA would send their rejects to the RMP.


    There was a definite pecking order.
     
  8. The dishonest approach would be to look at where the records of these dislocations are held and see if there is any way not disclosing them would get you through a medical, (obviously it's too late for TA, but something for RAf).

    This is obviously your choice, i'm not recommending it, just mentioning it. To do this you would stand to get kicked out if they ever found out, and potentially could be prosecuted...

    Incidentally, it's well worth doing some personal reading into shoulder injuries, as unless the dislocation was caused in seriously traumatic event, such as a car crash, then it's most likely a muscle imbalance issue and surgery is a somewhat ineffective sledgehammer approach..

    To give you the short version, shoulders dislocate either through great force (and very rarely dislocate posteriorly) or because of scapular positioning - i.e. if a shoulder dislocates in a game of rugby it is usually a stability problem not solely cause by the tackle . Lots of talk of weak rotator cuffs is cr@p as rotator cuffs can't degenerate on their own, and their is always a secondary cause. Most problems originate from the hip joint, but a surgeon likes to cut, so they're unlikely to look at other solutions..

    Look into some of the work done by Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson and it'll give you a bit of heads up.
     
  9. I got chinned for the TA on the grounds that I had what's called the Hill-Sachs defect. The Latin/Medical name has eleventy million letters, but it means that if you've had a "collision" in the clavicular area, it's basically non-healable. (I thinks that's an explanation)

    I was in a RTA in '92, and as well as the shoulder injury I had broken ribs, 2 broken legs, a fractured skull, several broken fingers and a broken Schnozz.

    Because my shoulder issue is classed as a chronic condition, they weren't interested, yet I climb up power station chimneys several times a week, and lift out car engines all the time.

    Ho Hum!
     
  10. Thanks for the replies lads,

    Shortty Said "The dishonest approach would be to look at where the records of these dislocations are held and see if there is any way not disclosing them would get you through a medical, (obviously it's too late for TA, but something for RAf).

    This is obviously your choice, i'm not recommending it, just mentioning it. To do this you would stand to get kicked out if they ever found out, and potentially could be prosecuted..."


    I agree with you shortty, lying isnt a good option as the risk of getting caught is too great. Besides, I dont think my GP would agree to not disclosing it. Professionalism and all that jazz.

    Thanks for the tip off about Cressey and Robertson, I've done some of their stuff before although I didnt know it and found it really good. Will look into it some more.

    I might consider a "second opinion" from a physio as the NHS offered me an appointment for one as well as the surgeons.
     
  11. Definitely worthwhile IMHO. I find that each professional likes to think his profession has the answer, and to quote scrubs "Cutters like to cut". At least if a physio has a bash and can't help, then you're no worse off, but if a surgeon needlessly butchers your shoulder it would be a shame.
     
  12. You need to make appt to see your GP, and ask for his opinion and possible referral to an orthopaedic surgeon "with a specific interest in shoulder surgery". Be honest with him and tell him you wish to enlist after any shoulder surgery.

    My Ex wife had the old fashioned Petit Platt operation, very restricted external rotation and ached like hell in the cold and damp. She just made base camp at Everest age 50 though so it cant be too bad !

    Meanwhile try 08456 003 003 New NHS "Physio Direct" service
    Mon Fri 8.30am until 4.30pm
     
  13. I agree with shortty, I know the navy (and I think the RAF), dont actually request your med records unless you mention something that might be a problem at your medical. If this is your only way of getting in, then you could go for it. As mentioned above, there are potential consequences, but if thats the only way you can get in, then it may be an avenue you have to pursue.
     
  14. Hi All
    I had a motorcycle accident about 5years ago and seperated my shoulder, would this rule me out from joining? Be gutted if it did!
     
  15. I had my shoulder pinned 15 years ago after several dislocations. The original discolation was due to being mown down by a car & was pretty nasty at the time, a full on arm pointing the wrong way.

    After the op it took a good couple of years to get over feeling it was always going to pop out but it never did. I also got a cracking scar that looked like a shark bite!!

    When I had my TA medical last year I did mention the operation but it wasn't an issue, although obviously I have been problem free for a while.

    Hope that helps