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medical downgrading

#2
If you are in training and your downgraded, you're basically discharged.

If you're a trained soldier than it just means you can't do the role you're currently employed in. It's broken down into catagories as to what jobs you can and can't do I believe.

Hope that helps.
 
#3
It means that you shall be derided and looked upon with suspicion for the length of time you are downgraded. No matter how serious your injury there will always be that implied look that you are pulling a fast one and simply a lazy fat biff.
This goes double for ladies or if you have a "back problem".
 
#4
so does that count in the TA? so if you are a trained soldier after phase one they wont discharge you they will just tell you what job you can do? is this the same if you opt for an operation tour?
 
#5
laurencarter said:
so does that count in the TA? so if you are a trained soldier after phase one they wont discharge you they will just tell you what job you can do? is this the same if you opt for an operation tour?
Does this mean you are expecting to be downgraded at some stage? This is a strange question for someone who has only just attended their selection weekend.

If downgraded there is also an financial impliacation as pay scales/grades can be reduced.
 
#7
Downgrading can still allow you to deploy on operations but not in Frontline Combat roles (if you are a trained soldier). I'm currently graded as a P3 which is a downgrade and will not be upgraded due to my condition. But am awaiting mobilisation for Herrick 10. I'm also incidently a TA soldier.
 
#8
Downgrading means that you have some kind of medical problem with potential to affect performance, or requiring medication. It can be temporary (often P3) or more long-running (P7).

What it stops you doing is based on your risk assessment. If it's minor, it may not stop you doing anything at all, if it's major you could be on home duties only. It isn't the grade that blocks anything, however, but the risk assessment from your PC, RMO and Occupational Medicine.
 

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