Medical Board Oct 2019 - Med Discharge due to PTSD (NON SERVICE RELATED) where do i stand??

I am a Cpl serving in the Army for nearly 15 years.i have been on WIS twice (this time since may 2019)

i have been told i am highly likely to get medically discharged, and have a full med board in oct this year. (as in next month) i will be discharged under the grounds of PTSD/ANXIETY/DEPRESSION)

although these symptoms are incompatible with service life. they are not caused by Tour or anything that happened whilst in work. it has been caused from another traumatic event (family event) and as such has taken its toll for the last 2 years. i dont know where i stand to any financial implications from the army... will i get a med pension? will i get a payout? only recently there has been support and care from my new unit. last xmas i attempted suicide twice, and only since then has there been any support or care. for the last 18 months prior to that the units, only did what they had to do (to tick boxes) the support and care wasnt there, and caused me to attempt suicide in dec last year. now because this ptsd isnt directly the armys fault. where do i stand... will i get a kick and thrown out the door with nothing... or will i get any financial incentive...?? or entitlements?

regards

Jon
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I suggest you go and speak to your welfare Officer and, perhaps, the unit padre.
 
I suggest you go and speak to your welfare Officer and, perhaps, the unit padre.
im not one to speak to the padre.... never have i dont believe. i have been in comms with the uwo for some months. and he is finding out what he can, but hes only one guy, theres 1000s of you guys :)
 
You are not entitled to AFCS as the PTSD is not service related. You should be entitled to a pension (Service Invaliding) which will be subject to tax.

You need to ask regarding your pension. Concentrate on your resettlement, if you don’t already have a degree the Army will Fund you through one.
 

Toppet

Old-Salt
im not one to speak to the padre.... never have i dont believe. i have been in comms with the uwo for some months. and he is finding out what he can, but hes only one guy, theres 1000s of you guys :)
I am a strong atheist. I consulted a padre twice in my career.

They are non judgemental and dont mind that you're not religious - they have a wealth of experience in helping people in difficult times, no matter the persons background or beliefs (or lack of).
 

Tuffty

War Hero
Remember to keep a diary of all names dates meeting etc prior to leaving, you will need it once your out and try to claim for anything.

Once out go to the Legion they are v helpful
 
The padre can some times do more at the CoC will listen to them.
From you're title go see padre at unit and ask them for help & guidance they WILL help you.
Its not about them being religious but getting you the help you need.
 
The padre can some times do more at the CoC will listen to them.
From you're title go see padre at unit and ask them for help & guidance they WILL help you.
Its not about them being religious but getting you the help you need.
Spot on, they cut through the chain of command and can say things chaps with your cap badge wouldn't dream of saying. They are well worth having in your corner along with the UWO.
 

Forces Pension Society

Sponsor
Sponsor
I am a Cpl serving in the Army for nearly 15 years.i have been on WIS twice (this time since may 2019)

i have been told i am highly likely to get medically discharged, and have a full med board in oct this year. (as in next month) i will be discharged under the grounds of PTSD/ANXIETY/DEPRESSION)

although these symptoms are incompatible with service life. they are not caused by Tour or anything that happened whilst in work. it has been caused from another traumatic event (family event) and as such has taken its toll for the last 2 years. i dont know where i stand to any financial implications from the army... will i get a med pension? will i get a payout? only recently there has been support and care from my new unit. last xmas i attempted suicide twice, and only since then has there been any support or care. for the last 18 months prior to that the units, only did what they had to do (to tick boxes) the support and care wasnt there, and caused me to attempt suicide in dec last year. now because this ptsd isnt directly the armys fault. where do i stand... will i get a kick and thrown out the door with nothing... or will i get any financial incentive...?? or entitlements?

regards

Jon
I do not know which scheme you were in before 1 April 2015 but the article in this magazine covers combination benefits for those who have AFPS 75/15 and AFPS 05/15 rights, and a condition in Tier 1 (which is the Tier that most conditions seem to get put in).
Here’s November Pathfinder
 
i was on the 75 scheme from when i joined in 04. and stayed on the 75 scheme by choice, until 2015 when we all automatically changed
 

adampoo

Clanker
Mate, Im in a very similar position and also happen to be REME. If you ever need to chat or anything please PM me. Im currently going through the wringer with the same issues.
 
not much help, had to contact the forces pension society and they worked out some figures for me, will just have see what happens next week on the board.
 
I've been recently medically discharged due to two chronic conditions (not service related) and was on a joint unit where the support unit was Army-led. For my last few months I was assigned to an RAF station - and what a refreshing change. They were much more joined-up and very helpful, with my case handled (with my approval) by a multi-disciplinary team involving admin staff, medics, padre, welfare, resettlement, DIO, local social services and NHS. I also learned of a lot of assistance for someone being invalided from the service that the Army didn't tell me:
  • You are entitled to a shed-load of leave including the little-known 20 days Invaliding Leave. Few clerks are aware of this. Sit down with your clerk when they calculate your last day in uniform (discharge) date.
  • Make sure that you get your full entitlement of resettlement leave and that the army don't try to short change you. I understand that the army want to discharge personnel asap; the RAF took about 12 months, during which I was on permanent sick leave and was not expected to work.
  • You are entitled to a further 3 months in SFA after discharge date and can apply to occupy a surplus quarter for a further 12 months. This might be convenient for schooling/partner's employment etc
  • You have access to service medical centres for a further 6 months after discharge. Press your UWO to initiate this - again, it's not well-known. It doesn't have to be on your current camp, but one convenient to your new home.
  • Take the next few months to get fit, and kick into touch any smoking, drinking or poor diet habits
  • Get your resettlement underway with a career transition workshop - it is an entitlement, along with T&S and doesn't consume any leave. You have access to CTP resources for 2 years after discharge and if you don't spend your various resettlement funds before discharge - or can't fit particular courses in - these can be carried over after discharge.
  • Get your Railcard for you, your partner and children renewed on your last day of service...
  • Also, get yourself on the 'Financial Aspects of Resettlement' Course. Probably the most valuable course that I have ever attended (and should have been exposed to it when I joined!). Again, like the Transition Workshop and a Housing Briefing, these are entitlements and you can claim T&S.
  • If you have children and they are in receipt of CEA or SENA (special educational needs allowance) the MOD will continue to pay this up to their next education break-point. In my case, my daughter had just started GCSEs and it was agreed that CEA will be paid to end of Upper Sixth (worth to me a cool £78k).
  • How's your hearing? Get referred to the Defence Audiology Service by your Dr and get the best hearing aids around for free (helps if you 'fail' your next hearing test...). Get your medical centre to order a gazillion batteries for you before you leave. Once you leave the service, RBL have a fund to maintain and replace your hearing aids, on behalf of MOD.
  • Don't sell your surplus kit and uniform on eBay. People pay good money for crap kit...so I hear.
  • RBL have quite a lot of impartial information on their website for service leavers.
  • SSAFA, likewise. Along with RBL, they can probably provide more up to date info that a Regtl Association 'dug out' wallah.
  • Combat Stress also may be able to help given your condition.
  • Join the Forces Pension Society for £35. They are the only people who can advocate on your behalf on pension matters. Do NOT go near any of those so-called Pension Help Lines offered on social media.
  • Obviously I can't comment on your pension but you should be pleasantly surprised by what you will receive. Veterans UK, on receipt of notification that you are being discharged, will provide you a forecast of your lump sum and pension. They are pretty good, but mistakes do creep in to calculations - refer results to the Forces Pension Society
  • Network like fůck for your next career (if you are able to work). Best advice I was given was 'don't hang around home in your dressing gown dropping a trail of toast crumbs". LinkedIn is primus inter pares but use the web browser and not the app. Similarly, don't register for 'security cleared' groups etc. That's professional advice. Go to the myriad of CTP road shows, insight events etc. You can claim T&S for some of them - speak to your resettlement staff.
  • Try to get a Civilian Work Placement or two. Again, you can get up to 7 weeks with prospective employers; they can't pay you but you can claim T&S (get a whopping advance on JPA beforehand). I spent a couple of weeks with a well-known bank and met an Associate Vice President there who, two years earlier, had been a Cpl musician.
  • There's the thorny issue of 'double-dipping', ie working for a civilian employer whilst still receiving your Army pay. The rules say that you can apply to work during your terminal leave with your CO's approval. This is a made-up MOD 'rule' which cannot be enforced; it's nothing to do with your CO. Just don't park your company BMW or 'Joe's Handyman Service' van on the driveway of your quarter. However, if you decide to take paid employment whilst still in, you will be taxed on your new salary at 40% as secondary income. Either tell your new employer that you are in receipt of other pay and for them to set the tax code appropriately, or your will have to submit a tax return at the end of the financial year. Not difficult, but expect to pay more tax.
  • Most employers are well-disposed to taking on service-leavers. You DO NOT need to say why you are leaving. All you need to say (and this is covered in the CTP workshop) is "I'm at the end of my contract". Through HR at your next employers, you can reveal (if you feel that you have to) that you are recovering from (never suffering) from PTSD and seek 'reasonable adjustments', such as time off to see counsellors or therapists. I have to go for regular cancer treatment and generally 'work from home' the next day (out of fairness, I tried to schedule treatment on Friday afternoons). The company is happy with that, and given that I'm registered as disabled, it looks great on the company's Diversity and Inclusion stats.
  • Finally don't be a victim. Turn this into a wonderful opportunity - you must be in your early 30s - more than young enough to start a new, professional career - potentially for the next 40 years. Use your experiences of the last 15 years as a foundation for something better and don't look back!
ETA additional thoughts.
 
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chimera

LE
Moderator
I've been recently medically discharged due to two chronic conditions and was on a joint unit where the support unit was Army-led. For my last few months I was assigned to an RAF station - and what a refreshing change. They were much more joined-up and very helpful, with my case handled by a multi-disciplinary team involving admin staff, medics, padre, welfare, resettlement, DIO, local social services and NHS. I also learned of a lot of assistance for someone being invalided from the service that the Army didn't tell me:
  • You are entitled to a shed-load of leave including the little-known 20 days Invaliding Leave. Few clerks are aware of this.
  • Make sure that you get your full entitlement of resettlement leave and that the army don't try to short change you. I understand that the army want to discharge personnel asap; the RAF took about 12 months, during which I was on permanent sick leave and was not expected to work.
  • You are entitled to a further 3 months in SFA after discharge date and can apply to occupy a surplus quarter for a further 12 months. This might be convenient for schooling/partner's employment etc
  • You have access to service medicalcentres for a further 6 months after discharge. Press your UWO to initiate this - again, it's not well-known. It doesn't have to be on your current camp, but one convenient to your new home.
  • Get your resettlement underway with a career transition workshop. You have access to CTP resources for 2 years after discharge and if you don't spend your various resettlement funds before discharge - or can't fit particular courses in - these can be carried over after discharge.
  • If you have children and they are in receipt of CEA or SENA (special needs allowance) the MOD will continue to pay this up to their next education break-point. In my case, my daughter had just started GCSEs and it was agreed that CEA will be paid to end of Upper Sixth (worth a cool £78k).
  • How's your hearing? Get referred to the Defence Audiology Service by your Dr and get the best hearing aids around for free. Get your medical centre to order a gazillion batteries for you before you leave. Once you leave the service, RBL have a fund to maintain and replace your hearing aids, on behalf of MOD.
  • Don't sell your surplus kit and uniform on eBay. People pay good money for crap kit...so I hear.
  • RBL have quite a lot of impartial information on their website for service leavers.
  • Join the Foreces Pension Society for £35. They are the only people who can advocate on your behalf on pension matters. Do NOT go near any of those so-called Pension Help Lines offered on social media.
  • Obviously I can't comment on your pension but you should be pleasantly surprised by what you will received.
  • Network like fůck for your next career (if you are able to work). Best advice I was given was 'don't hang around home in your dressing gown dropping a trail of toast crumbs". LinkedIn is primus inter pares but use the web browser and not the app. Similarly, don't register for 'security cleared' groups etc. That's professional advice. Go to the myriad of CTP road shows, insight events etc. You can claim T&S for some of them - speak to your resettlement staff.
  • Finally don't be a victim. Turn this into a wo fearful opportunity- you must be in your early 30s - more than young enough to start a new, professional career.
Really great post. This information should be saved as a Sticky Post somewhere.
 
I am a strong atheist. I consulted a padre twice in my career.

They are non judgemental and dont mind that you're not religious - they have a wealth of experience in helping people in difficult times, no matter the persons background or beliefs (or lack of).

Same here. Good guys.


Plus Anglicans aren't exactly the Taliban on matters of faith.
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
Remember to keep a diary of all names dates meeting etc prior to leaving, you will need it once your out and try to claim for anything.
also keep all copies of appointment letters, reports, and so on and don't rely on the Services receiving or keeping them. Grab a ring-binder from the section stationery store and file everything sequentially. Take it to the Med Board as you can guarantee that they won't have all your medical documents.

There is one medical centre on a Service establishment where reports from the NHS on individuals were claimed 'not to have been received' or 'not filed properly'. Moreover, reports from NHS consultants and lab results, which should have been seen by the Medical Officer, were being filed/shredded/lost behind the cabinet without being reviewed. There is certainly one death being investigated because of poor record keeping and lack of follow up.
 
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