Medal of Honor for US Army Ranger

#1
Just saw this today:

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release

May 31, 2011

ADVISORY: President Obama to Award Medal of Honor

On July 12th, President Barack Obama will award Sergeant First Class Leroy Arthur Petry, U.S. Army, the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry. Sergeant First Class Petry will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions during combat operations against an armed enemy in Paktya, Afghanistan in May, 2008. He will be the second living, active duty service member to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Iraq or Afghanistan. Sergeant First Class Petry’s wife, Ashley, and other family members will join the President at the White House to commemorate his example of selfless service.

PERSONAL BACKGROUND:

Leroy Arthur Petry was born on July 29, 1979. He is a native of Santé Fe, New Mexico and enlisted in the United States Army in September 1999. He attended Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. Sergeant First Class Petry is currently assigned to the 75th Ranger Regiment and attached to Special Operations Command (SOCOM) with duty at Joint Base Lewis McChord as a liaison for the SOCOM Care Coalition where he tracks and monitors injured Rangers returning from the Theater of Operations to the initial place of care to home station care.

Sergeant First Class Petry has completed multiple combat tours to Afghanistan and Iraq totaling 28 months of deployment.

His military decorations include: two Bronze Stars, a Purple Heart, three Army Commendation Medals, two Army Achievement Medals, National Defense Service Medal, three Army Good Conduct Medals, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Combat Star, Iraq Campaign Medal with Combat Star, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, to name a few.
I find it notable that despite losing a hand he is able to remain on active duty.

Well done Sergeant!


More details are here:

Army.mil Article: Wounded Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for action in Afghanistan
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
unlike all the other medals they give out, indeed well done that man
 
#7
Indeed! Rangers Lead The Way! — Sua Sponte
 
#10
"Petry threw a thermobaric grenade"

Woah, THAT sounds fun...

Nails actions on, BTW.
 
#12
unlike all the other medals they give out, indeed well done that man
Without distracting too much from the subject of this thread that rightly acknowledges the valor of this soldier, while I agree with and respect many of your posts, this one (IMHO, unseemly on this thread) dig is clearly both overbroad and unfair and indeed beneath your otherwise high standards.

Let me preface my disagreement in readily agreeing with you that there is the phenomenon in some parts of the US military and in some situations of "award creep," and in candidly noting the clearly differing overall philosophy between the US and the UK in general for rewarding noteworthy combat and other performance of duty with medals.

I hope we can both agree that much of this latter difference has nothing to do with the relative heroism or other superior performance of the individuals involved, whether American or British, but rather is rooted in cultural and historical reasons as is often evident when one compares the specific actions of a British soldier "only" mentioned in dispatches with virtually identical ones of an American soldier who receives a shiny thing to wear.

To generalize in the way you did does an unfair disservice to (and in many cases dishonors) the valor (and often the ultimate sacrifice) of that American soldier, Marine, airman or sailor who rightly deserves the particular medal awarded (not merely "given" as dismissively suggested). Also, contrary to your implication that all US medals are "fungible," if you will take the time to read the actual citations that accompany especially the Silver Star and the respective service Cross representing the nation's second highest award for combat valor and compare them to those accompanying the DSO, CGC, DSC, MC and DFC you may feel the least bit sheepish about the sweeping breadth of your post.
 
#14
Jumping, as long as the US Armed forces, that I respect, will approve of having recruits fresh out of basic training with a full row of ribbons/medals, the reputation of the said armed forces for dishing out medals by the crate load will remain.

Considering how many servicemen we now see in the FRA armed forces sporting Bronze Star, ARCOM or AAM on top of GWOTEM, CIBs and US "combat patches" etc, etc, I can't see this reputation being dispelled anytime soon even though I understand the need of diplomatic awards to keep allies "in the fight".

And BTW, well done that man !
 
#15
Jumping, as long as the US Armed forces, that I respect, will approve of having recruits fresh out of basic training with a full row of ribbons/medals, the reputation of the said armed forces for dishing out medals by the crate load will remain.

Considering how many servicemen we now see in the FRA armed forces sporting Bronze Star, ARCOM or AAM on top of GWOTEM, CIBs and US "combat patches" etc, etc, I can't see this reputation being dispelled anytime soon even though I understand the need of diplomatic awards to keep allies "in the fight".

And BTW, well done that man !
MY dear fellow, I acknowledged the difference in philosophy between nations on such things but surely on a military forum like this one would expect a bit more discernment between gallantry medals and all others. It is really a matter of degree in any event, as it really goes to the number of such things as even in the UK, medals are awarded for periods of service and the like having nothing to do with valor in combat.
 
#16
Having myself received a US decoration, I perfectly understand the difference between the awards, the V devices and so on, so there is no need to be patronizing even if old habits may die hard.

Simply, by association, and because of the way US armed forces distribute their medals, all US decorations are now suspect of having been handed for situations/actions that would not warrant an award in other armed forces.
 
#18
I served with a yank in Zagreb, Croatia. All we did was sit in a comms room with no threat etc, we did have a lot of banter and I actually quite liked him. This chap received 3 medals for that and one was for serving with troops of different countries. I did ask him why, but he didn't know. He wanted to put my name for one yank medal (can't remember which), but I politely declined.
 

Travelgall

LE
Kit Reviewer
#19
It seems fairly clear that this thread was started to pay tribute to a very brave man. It is also clear that the man fully deserved his medal. Why not start a separate thread on Medal Creep in the US armed forces and whether it exists or not?
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top