Medal Geeks!

#1
Who can find a more impressive rack than this? - quality not quantity! These belonged to Albert Jacka VC, MC and bar, 14th Battalion AIF, also includes 1914-15 Star, 14-18 War Medal, Victory Medal. (Pip, Squeak and Wilfred)



Edited...see below
 
#2
Not entirely a gay thread, but the gaudy picture and refs of gayness probably paint the wrong picure. To be honest it's a soldier's acknowledgement of a very brave man, let's have more, Of Albert Jacka:

His citation for the award reads:

The grave of Albert Jacka, VC, in St Kilda cemetery, Melbourne.On 19/20 May 1915, at "Courtney's Post", Gallipoli, Turkey, Lance Corporal Jacka, while holding a portion of our trench with four other men, was heavily attacked. When all except himself were killed or wounded, and the trench was rushed and occupied by seven Turks, Lance-Corporal Jacka most gallantly attacked them single handed, killing the whole party, five by rifle and two with the bayonet.

Interesting that his second award of the MC was considered by many to be worthy of a second VC.

We could do this more frequently, almost as an act of Remembrance. Last night I re-read "Passchendaele" by Philip Warner. He quoted an officer of the R. Warks Regt, who mentioned that a soldier of his, Sgt Wheeldon, DCM and Bar, MM and Bar, who was killed in 1917. I immediately looked at the CWGC site to find out exactly when he died but, for God's sake, the man was four times decorated for gallantry, should we not consider these men in Remembrance alongside VC recipients. We all read this thread, Remembrance is a self-motivated sentiment that, so to speak , starts at home. Gentlemen,
Sgt H.H. Wheeldon DCM*, MM*, R. Warks Regt. Tyne Cot Cemetery.
 
#3
legal_eagle said:
Who can find a more impressive rack than this? - quality not quantity! These belonged to Albert Jacka VC, MC and bar, 14th Battalion AIF, also includes 1914-15 Star, 14-18 War Medal, Victory Medal. (Pip, Squeak and Wilfred)



P.S. No need to tell me what a gay thread this is, if you're not interested just p!ss off to another one! :D
Nuts of steel this fellah Jacka. They were made of sterner stuff our forebears.
 
#5
Deerhunter...fair comment and edited appropriately. As for the picture, I wasn't seeking it out, I just happened upon it so if a less gaudy one exists, I don't know of it...
 
#7
I had a feeling someone mention and Noel Chavasse and Charles Upham's medals (but no pictures!), so by way of Devil's advocate I will fight Jacka's corner.

The Great War was a far bloodier affair for the troops involved and Jacka fought from start to finish and survived. He won his VC as a 22 year old Lance Jack. Furthermore, as Deerhunter correctly points out the bar to his MC was awarded for an action many considered to be even more worthy of a VC than his actual VC award.

PS. Ventress, who's are the first rack in the second link? The Great War VC, MC..

Scrap that, edited for being a numpty...it actually says Chavasse in the URL...I knew he was a double VC but I didn't know he also had an MC..guess he just about trumps Jacka then.. :(
 
#8
Capt George Stuart Henderson. VC,DSO & Bar, MC, MID X3
1st Battalion Manchester Regt.

VC. 29/10/20.
DSO. 31/5/16 Bar 25/8/17.
MC. 31/7/15.
MID 1/1/16,15/8/17,9/920.
 

Attachments

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#9
legal_eagle said:
PS. Ventress, who's are the first rack in the second link? The Great War VC, MC..

Scrap that, edited for being a numpty...it actually says Chavasse in the URL...I knew he was a double VC but I didn't know he also had an MC..guess he just about trumps Jacka then.. :(
Capt WB Allen VC DSO MC and bar RAMC is also an impressive collection of gallantry medals.
 
#11
Not being a medal geek can somebody tell me how L/Cpl Jacka was awarded the MC shouldn't it have been an MM not being commissioned and all that, saw his story very briefly on "Victorial Cross Heroes" on UKTv History the other day

Seemed like your stereotypical bloody minded Aussie but no less brave for it.
 
#12
Not a medal group photo - but man for man a mighty fine collection in the Guard of Honour for the interment of the Unknown Warrior.

Surprised to see that the Navy & RAF were allowed non-VCs. Still mighty brave bunch though unknown Warrior

Our Unknown Warrior on parade (I suppose) also holds the Medal of Honor (US). Theirs has the VC.
 
#13
SAKR_AL_AMN said:
They were made of sterner stuff our forebears.
Were they? I would suggest that despite the constant scorn that can be given out in respect of the youth of today those who serve still manage to serve with the ability to be as heroic as there forebears. I agree there are some amazing feats carried out by our forebears but there are also amazing acts of heroism carried out by troops now.

Please don't take this as me belittling the efforts of our previous generations, indeed I've spent many an afternoon on the lash in the Royal Hospital with my Grandad and his muckers exchanging pleasantries (and abuse where necessary!!!!)
 
#15
This guy must have had problems walking.



First VC
In March 1941 Upham's battalion left for Greece and then withdrew to Crete, and it was here that he was wounded in the action – from 22-30 May 1941 – that gained him his first VC. When informed of the award, his first response was, "It's meant for the men".[4]

The award citation declared that he displayed outstanding gallantry in close-quarter fighting, and was twice hit by mortar fire and badly wounded. In spite of this and an attack of dysentery which reduced him to a skeletal appearance, he refused hospital treatment and carried a badly-wounded man to safety when forced to retire. Eight days later he fended off an attack at Sphakia, 22 German soldiers falling to his fire.

Second VC
Upham was evacuated to Egypt, now promoted to Captain. He received a Bar to his VC for his actions on 14-15 July 1942.

When leading his company attacking an enemy-held ridge overlooking the El Alamein battlefield, he was wounded twice but took the objective after fierce fighting. He destroyed a German tank, several guns and vehicles with grenades. A machine-gun bullet through the elbow shattered Upham's arm, but he went on again to a forward position and brought back some of his men who had become isolated.

After his wounds were dressed, he returned to his men but was again severely wounded and unable to move. He was eventually overrun by the superior weight of the enemy forces and taken prisoner of war (POW). While in captivity, he was sent to an Italian hospital to recuperate but attempted to escape numerous times before being branded "dangerous" by the Germans and incarcerated in the infamous Oflag IV-C (Colditz) on October 14, 1944.
 
#17
watched "VC Heros" last night on UKTV History, moving stuff,

would be good to make the kids at school towatch for GCSE History might drive a little respect into them
 
#18
Sometimes this sort of gallantry runs in the blood. In WW1 4 brothers, the Bradfords = 2 VCs, 1 DSO and one MC. Sadly only one survived the war. Some details about them:
Roland and George were the only brothers in the war to each win a Victoria Cross, the greatest wartime honour.
Roland, the most famous of the four, joined the DLI in 1912 and went to France in September 1914 with the second battalion of the regiment.
He had a meteoric rise, winning the Military Cross at Armentieres for leading an attack. As leader of the ninth battalion of the DLI he was made a Lieutenant Colonel in 1916 and won his VC at the Somme.
On November 10 1917 he was made a Brigadier-General at the age of only 25. He was and may still be the youngest man ever to have held that rank in the British Army.
Less than three weeks later he was killed at Cambrai, France, in the first major tank battle in history as he led infantry troops behind tanks advancing across enemy trenches. [Not correct... see below * Ed.]
In his honour a plaque was placed in St Cuthbert's Church, Darlington, and a porch at the town's Memorial Hospital was dedicated to him.

George, the second oldest Bradford brother, was killed in the Zeebrugge blockade in April 1918, and was awarded his VC posthumously.
He was a Lieutenant Commander with the Royal Navy and had been in charge of assault forces attacking a concrete arm built into the sea.
The aim had been to draw German fire while ships were sunk in the canal running from the port inland to Bruges, to prevent U-boats harboured there from entering the sea.

James joined the Northumberland Hussars as a private in 1913 and the next year went to France with them.
He then joined the 18th battalion of the DLI and was made a Second Lieutenant in September 1915.
In March 1917 he was awarded the Military Cross for his role as a bombing officer in charge of ground troops throwing bombs into enemy trenches.
On May 10 he was wounded and died four days later at Arras.

Only Thomas survived and went on to have a full life until his death at the age of 80 in 1966.
He served as a Captain with the eighth battalion of the DLI and was in Ypres from April 1915, where he was wounded in battle. The following January he was given the Distinguished Service Order, the highest award for an officer after the VC.
He was made Brigade Major and spent the last two years of the war training officers from the Yorkshire and Lancashire regiment.
 
#19
zippy483 said:
Not being a medal geek can somebody tell me how L/Cpl Jacka was awarded the MC shouldn't it have been an MM not being commissioned and all that, saw his story very briefly on "Victorial Cross Heroes" on UKTv History the other day
He was commissioned in the field after Gallipoli and prior to the A.I.F. being sent to France in time for the 1916 offensives. In France he added 2 MCs to his VC!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Jacka




http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/EU-treaty-NON/
 
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