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Medal for sale

#3
I think this CGC is going to go over the £60K mark, and cash in hand and replicas for high days and holidays sounds a good call to me. Totally agree family comes first.
 
#6
I agree that money isn't everything, but does he really need to sell it? Can't he come to some arrangement with the Royal Marines Museum in Portsmouth? If he really is in need of money, why doesn't the RM Association help out? I hope he gets the monies he wants, he deserves it reading that citation. Personally, would i do it? There was a time that i would have, but not today, tomorrow is a different day. Good luck to the lad and his family.
 
#8
Sounds like he deserves 60k cash more than most people with that much money. He's done the equivalent of more than a few years hard work in one afternoon.

Cashing in is a good way to add even more meaning to such actions. The medals are intended as a reward, good way to make that reward is meaningful to the whole family who put up with their bloke doing such dangerous stuff.
 

BrunoNoMedals

LE
Kit Reviewer
#9
VC/GC holders get, what, £1500 a year? Is there anything similar for CGC?

Even if there was, I'm guessing it's nowhere near making up for a £60k payout...
 
#10
Good luck to him. The honour of being awarded it will always be there and he can get a replica made. He's earned his place in British Military history, now its time to take care of his family.

Am I right thinking this is the first one ever to go on sale? If so lets hope he gets a lot more than 60k.
 
#11
The fact that he's Royal Marine will make the medal worth a lot more money. Depends how many RM collectors are after it as to whether he'll get £60k. Also depends what other medals come with it. I should imagine he'll have QGJM, definitely have Iraq medal and could have GSM (NI) as well as others.
 
#12
Mag_to_grid said:
Would you do it? 60k is a lot of money for a small piece of metal and cloth. Money isnt everything though.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/8231561.stm
I would like to think that I would do the same thing. But as I am not in his shoes, damned if I know. "Small piece of metal and cloth" indeed, but I am fair certain that I would have an emotional attachment to it.

I wish him all the best and hope that he gets a cracking good price for it.

It strikes me as a tad sad that we live in a society which remunerates Goody and Jordan more than this guy.
 
#14
A medal is just a object that tells other people what you have done in your career, be it an OSM for a tour of Afghanistan or a Military Cross for a brave deed. Although the medal itself may have sentimental value the recipient knows what he's done in his career and a replacement medal shows to others what he's done just as an original medal does.
If anyone met this bloke on a remembrance parade would they think any less of him if his medals weren't the originals he was issued? I wouldn't.
 
#15
buttonsin3s said:
Can't he come to some arrangement with the Royal Marines Museum in Portsmouth?
Of course, it's entirely up to him what he does with it but it's a fair point about the RM Museum.

It's always a pity when the relevant museum, with its limited resources ends up paying well over the odds because of a bidding war. I would imagine that most people would agree that ideally if a medal leaves its recipient, the next best place for it would be on permanent display in the appropriate museum, rather than hidden away in a medal collector's hoard.

Must confess, I'm a bit puzzled about the pre-publicity though; serious medal collectors don't need the BBC in order to learn about up-coming sales.
 
#16
As I understood it, our medals do not belong to us as they are in fact part of uniform and remain so after leaving the forces. I'm sure someone will confirm this. I fully understand his reasons and some people do not have an attachment to "Bits of metal and cloth" but its the very symbol and honour of what you did. I have my grandfathers medals from WW2 which were missing for a number of years, we thought a relation had flogged them but they turned up! Unfortunately my own gongs have gone astray and I have had to buy copies. Its not the same as they were mine and included one presented by the Duke of Rothesay.
 
#20
Drumbox said:
As I understood it, our medals do not belong to us as they are in fact part of uniform and remain so after leaving the forces.
No you are wrong. Once you have left the forces your medals become your own to do as you wish with them.
 

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