McGuinness - NOT on the IRAs Army Council

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/4282197.stm

Well I am convinced. Obviously he is much maligned and has no connection what so ever with PIRA. Nor has he had anything to do with robbing the Northern Bank of rakes of cash either - nothing at all.

This is all a securocrats trick to "blacken" the name of the IRA/SF.

Now this is the best bit

"It is an attempt to smear republicans with the criminalisation slur - straight out of the Maggie Thatcher handbook of dealing with Irish republicanism," he said.
and of course the republican handbook of dealing with Maggie Thatcher was to blow her up......

They are bent and even the dogs in the street know it.

I wager the denial of IRA involvement will soften to "well we don't know" by the end of the week, and "nothing to do with us" by the week after.

Choo choo ar la. - My train will come
 
#2
Not even the Irish Government believe him now so why are we still spending millions soon to be £100,000,000 million on a farce of an inquiry?

IMHO Bliar hates the Armed Forces even more than G.Brown and is willing to see us reduced to such a level where it makes sense however unappealing to become part of a EU army.
 
#3
agree with you totally.

chucki ar la - my deranged mudering alive childs doll of movie fame will come.
 
#4
GBP150million, I think.
Republican crime is not crime. PIRA/PSF have redifined it as an essential adjunct to the ongoing struggle for freedom. This means that every broken bone and every intimidated witness is a step on the ladder to Greatness for the Good Leader Gerry (and his pretty friend Martin) in their Great Quest to bring Freedom to Ireland, whether it likes it or not. Those who don't want this version of Freedom must line up over there on the left, by the wall.
 
#5
Well i suppose with McGuiness as education minister we can expect class room discipline to improve.

If anyone acts up they get a shoeing, have their elbows shot out before someone kicks their front door down and drags their mum off and slots her "for talking tp the headmaster".

Chewbacca ar la - My 6ft 6" hairy avatar will come. (Mind your eyes)
 
#6
an irish mate of mine has just got back from the republic , and SF/PIRA's name is absolute dogsh*t , they'll be lucky to bounce back from this one.

apparently , killing and bombing is ok , but "feathering your nest" is a big no no.
 
#7
Anyone see this Sunday Torygraph article about the IRA murder of a republican called McCartney? It looks like their "own" people are getting tired of them:

This time the IRA may have cut its own throat too
By Jenny McCartney
(Filed: 20/02/2005)

On the evening of Sunday, January 30, Robert McCartney went out for a drink in a Belfast bar with his friend, Brendan Devine. By the next morning, after an altercation with a group of IRA men, he was dead. Now, three weeks later, his murder has returned to haunt the IRA, more grievously even than the recent revelations of its involvement in the £26.5 million Northern Bank robbery.


In photographs, Mr McCartney – a 33-year-old Catholic father of two, fork-lift truck driver and keen body-builder – looks as if he could easily hold his own in a fist-fight: his misfortune, however, was to be set upon by a psychopathic gang of five men armed with sewer rods and knives.

Mr McCartney lived in the staunchly nationalist Short Strand area of Belfast, and his popularity there was demonstrated by the turn-out at his funeral: the church was packed with such a multitude of mourners that many had to stand outside. The priest didn't mince his words: he expressed the emphatic wish that Mr McCartney's killers would be "brought to justice in this life, and soon".

The IRA men who were in Magennis's Whiskey Cafe in Belfast's city centre on the night of the murder had already taken every precaution to avoid being brought to justice, but even they couldn't prevent some details from leaking into the press. It appeared that a row had broken out between a group of IRA men and McCartney and Devine, in the course of which the senior IRA man present ordered his companions to resolve the dispute by slitting Mr Devine's throat. Mr McCartney's "crime" thereafter was to drag his seriously injured friend out of the bar, whereupon he himself was set upon, beaten with sewer rods, kicked and stabbed.

As the two men lay bleeding on the cold pavement, no one called for an ambulance. Instead, their IRA attackers walked back into the pub, locked the doors, and warned the appalled customers that if anyone talked about what had happened, everyone would be held responsible.

McCartney and Devine were eventually seen by a passing police patrol and taken to hospital. Mr McCartney died later that morning; Mr Devine survived.

The immediate aftermath was predictable enough: about 70 people were in the bar when Mr Devine had his throat cut and – curiously, you might think – no one had seen a thing. When the police instigated a search of nearby houses to gather evidence, youths "spontaneously" appeared to pelt the officers with bottles and bricks. Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey, a former Lord Mayor, indignantly condemned this "heavy-handed policing", which had apparently caused outrage.

So far, things had gone entirely according to plan for the IRA: omertà had been enforced, through the familiar exercise of intimidation and terror, and a carefully staged counter-attack of noisy political protest at "police tactics" was well under way. The killing might not have been formally sanctioned, but the IRA was nonetheless doing a routinely efficient job of protecting its own.

And then it all started to go wrong. The mutinous graffiti "PIRA scum out" appeared on walls in the Short Strand. Mark Durkan, the moderate nationalist SDLP leader, accused Sinn Fein of creating a smokescreen of "contrived riots which are then covered by Sinn Fein spokespersons who arrive to condemn the police". He also alleged that "Mr McCartney's killers are being protected by their position in the IRA and some have worked as bodyguards for Sinn Fein politicians". The dead man's fiancée and his five sisters spoke out forcefully against his killers, calling them "psychopaths", and condemned the IRA for trying to silence witnesses. They shunned any notion that the culprits might be "dealt with" internally by the IRA: they wanted witnesses to talk to the police, a trial, and convictions.

Sinn Fein seemed shocked: last week, for the first time, its leaders seemed to be nervously justifying itself before those it would once have complacently considered its "own people". Gerry Adams hastily said that "no one involved acted as a republican or on behalf of republicans" and the IRA issued a statement saying that "no one should hinder or impede the McCartney family in their search for justice".

Sinn Fein, however, has refused to advise any witnesses to speak to the police, recommending that they should instead contact a solicitor or a priest. As they and the McCartney family know, this contorted process would make it very difficult to secure any convictions.

Last week – shortly before it emerged that Irish police had arrested seven people in connection with the £26.5 million Northern Bank heist – Mr Adams appeared to be preparing the ground for Sinn Fein's embarrassment by softening his once-fervent denials of IRA involvement, saying: "The IRA has said it was not them. I believe them. But maybe I am wrong."

Some people have asked why the IRA would carry out such a robbery, knowing that it could prove politically damaging to Sinn Fein. The answer is simply that the opportunity arose, and the IRA thought it could get away with it. Exactly the same reasoning applies to the casual, arrogant murder of Mr McCartney outside a fashionable city-centre bar.

Throughout the "peace process", the IRA has regularly got away with the murder of ordinary Catholics while the British and Irish governments ignored the killings. In 1998, indeed – only months after the signing of the Belfast Agreement – eight IRA men murdered another 33-year-old Catholic man, Andrew Kearney, who was dragged from his tower-block flat and shot in both legs, whereupon he bled to death. As I recall, the governments regarded the murder of Mr Kearney – like the others that followed it – as an inconvenient matter to be passed over as quickly as possible.

I share a surname, a birthplace and an age with the late Robert McCartney. I doubt, however, that we would have had too many political views in common: before his death, he and his family were reportedly Sinn Fein voters. That McCartney family's quarrel with Sinn Fein began when the IRA murdered their brother; mine began long ago, when I realised that the IRA reserved the right to murder anyone who didn't agree with its political views.

But I salute Mr McCartney's courage, in standing up to the IRA men who attacked his friend, and that of his sisters, in so bravely pursuing justice for their brother. I pray that they get it, and there is one reason why they might. Brendan Devine, currently under armed police guard in a Belfast hospital, has reportedly said that he will testify.


© Copyright of Telegraph Group Limited 2005.
 
#8
i heard about the Robert McCartney thing last week. Adams was quoted as saying it wasn't done in the "Name of Republicanism".
Seeing as the leftie press seem to think everything the army do wrong(a la Mirror photos and Fusiler courtmarshal) we should be held accountable for. i hope they take this attitude with the P/IRA. I'm sure they will :wink:
 

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