May need a new hip...

1. How long a wait did you have for the op (being well aware that the current situation will put this back several months at least)?
3 months

2. How long did it take to recover? By recover I'll consider this to be able to walk normally.
Up on a frame on Day 2, out of hospital on a stick Day 11
You wont be driving for 12 weeks as DVLA gets told.

3. Are you immobile for any length of time i.e. unable to climb stairs?
You won't be discharged until you can manage stairs - it was my Phsyioterrorist 'Final Exam'


Exercise! Exercise! Exercise!
The more you do, the better your outcome. I was back doing stupid stuff like bimbling around on the top of Swiss alps 6 month after the op.

Had mine done aged 33, still working well and only just starting to show some wear 28 years on.
 

wafubustard

War Hero
Not a hip replacement but I my hip screwed and plated (dynamic hip screw?) last year.
The next day the physio had me walking with crutches and taught me how to climb stairs the correct way with a dodgy leg. I also had other exercises to do.
Keep the physio going.

I was told if I was any older I would have had a hip replacement however the best option is often to keep your original as long as possible.
 
Unfortunately, that advice may have had more to do with your surgeon’s reputation than your best interests. Bizarrely, subsequent ops are counted as revisions to the original surgery, and are seen as a black mark against the first surgeon, regardless of the reason. The prosthetics don’t last forever, so the younger you are, the more likely you are to need another op.

More positively, the current trend is to try and preserve the hip with arthroscopic resurfacing techniques (depending on the underlying condition), so don’t start browsing the DePuy Synthes catalogue just yet.

Pretty much all operations have been suspended, but the OP should talk to a hip specialist as soon as possible. One of the best in the field is Professor Griffin (Hip Arthroscopy Clinic).
I suppose they are thinking 15 years after op. takes me to 80 ,so I will have probably popped my clogs by then?
 

Imago

Old-Salt
Lot of conflicting info on here – some of it fairly out of date.

I had hip no. 1 replaced Oct 17; no. 2, Aug 19. I’m in Scotland and I’m 67.

Principal points; hip replacements are both amazing and recommended to anyone. Out of bed next day, first time two days on a Zimmer, second time straight on to sticks. 5 days in hospital, but mainly because I live alone; others in the ward who had spouses to collect them were out on day 3. Fun fact; apparently those who do worst are men who still have their wives – the women run round after them and so they don’t move and get better. If you’re on your own you just have to get on with it. Oh and stairs are the least of your worries. If you’ve been in that much pain pre-op, you’ve been doing dot-and-carry-one anyway – no difference with a stick. I live alone in a Victorian house with 22 steps ‘twixt living quarters and bedroom – no problem at all. Oh yes and someone mentioned DVLA. That’s nonsense; it’s not a heart attack and ‘they’ don’t inform them. Sort yourself out when you feel safe to manage the pedals; I took 8 weeks each time just to be sure and that was absolutely fine.

Bit more detail if you’ve not glazed over by now; with no.1 hip I went to GP and asked to be referred to orthopaedics. That took about 3 months. Stupid young bint - who was presumably qualified as she was ‘Miss’ rather than ‘Dr’, took 5 minutes to pronounce there was nothing wrong with my hip and I should take painkillers. When I said they were having no effect the response was ’Well, don’t take them then’. As a result I got bounced from one physio – who thought I had cancer and told me to go for a blood test (he was off with mental health probs the next time I attended) – to another who decided sciatica and I should follow the McKenzie routine which was fûcking useless because it wasn’t sciatica – to a third who thought trochanteric bursitis as mentioned above and undertook a steroid injection which made me quite ill in other ways but had absolutely zero effect on the pain – to a fourth who appeared to be the boss of the dept; and by this time I was getting very stroppy. Eventually got referred to ‘a sports medic’ (who turned out to have been the CMO for Team GB at 4 sets of Olympics) who looked at the same X-ray everyone else had seen and said ‘I think you need a new hip’. Halle-bloody-lujah. So I finally got back to the orthopods – consultant this time – who said oh yes, waiting list – so that was 11 months from going to GP.

Second one – didn’t mess about this time since I knew for a fact what it was – GP straight to (same) consultant – yes absolutely, marked file Urgent – in came NHS letter saying ‘Guaranteed treatment date 1st April’. Now on the previous occasion, similar ‘guaranteed’ date of 1st Oct had translated to 17th of that month. So I told work that I wouldn’t be in for April and May at least. 1st April came and went and I phoned orthopaedic secretary – who actually laughed at me. In the intervening 18 months, it turned out ‘1st April’ had come to mean ‘end of August’. But when I did get there, advances in medical tech meant that instead of 22 clips (self-important staples) in the wound, I was stuck back together with superglue! Brilliant stuff – much less painful, easier to get moving, has healed up so you would never know. Thing is just to grit your teeth and keep walking, every single day; one lamppost, two lampposts, end of the road, end of the road and another lamppost, round the block - eventually right round the park and finally ditch sticks and get on with it.

I gather from friends that all such ‘elective’ operations have been paused for the duration of the virus and certainly our surgery is not seeing any patients face-to-face, so it may take you a while to get anywhere near a diagnosis, never mind a waiting list. In which case, if you are in as much pain as I was, you have my sympathy. The last weekend before hip no.2 I drove 100 miles to see my granddaughter, sitting on one bum cheek, steering with one hand and using the other hand to hold myself off the seat with the handbrake. Only managed it because I was following junior offspring driving 44 ton; I reckoned if he could take a bend at any given speed, the venerable Volvo and I could too.

I think everyone’s symptoms are different but the worst thing pre-op was that I couldn’t get up from sitting down because the ball couldn’t move within the hip socket – it could sometimes take 10 minutes of agony to get vertical.

Good luck to OP!
 
I suppose they are thinking 15 years after op. takes me to 80 ,so I will have probably popped my clogs by then?
That’s not an unreasonable conclusion (the 15 years bit, not you popping your clogs - Sticky Senior had both hips done, one in his 80s) but, as @Imago ’s experience shows, a consistent approach - even within the NHS* - is a long way in the future. For every progressive surgeon who early-adopts innovations like ‘no-more-staples’ wound closure, you’re going to find an ultra-cautious traditionalist who hasn’t changed their procedure since they qualified in 1980. And both of them will probably have numerous malpractice suits against them; that is a fact of modern medicine.

Anyone who has worked with surgeons will understand that ego can sometimes trump logic. An experienced theatre nurse at an Tr&Orth conference once dryly observed that an orthopod was someone who, when undertaking a procedure for the very first time, will change it halfway through because they decided that they knew better than the research team and specialist manufacturer who had hundreds of years of experience between them. (Lots of uncomfortable laughter in the audience.)

Individual success stories are really encouraging, but the fact is that joint replacement operations leave some patients worse off in terms of quality of life, and a personal hip treatment plan would have worked better. Prof G (mentioned above) ran a lengthy randomised controlled trial at Warwick that showed age, physical condition and pre-op activity levels were key predictors.

*Some NHS trusts have actively discouraged relatively expensive elective orthopaedic surgery because it doesn’t suit their in-year budget. The obvious long term saving of the patient not being a burden in future years doesn’t always win the money argument.
 
Amateur physio second post today

My right hip was fucked from driving and sat at a desk.
I found some exercises on Athlean x that involve strengthening the surrounding muscles rather than stretching them and it went away fairly quickly
Have a look on you tube
One exercise involves lying face down on the kitchen table with the edge up to your groin then tighten your arse and lift your legs up about 20 times
I had a similar problem with my right hip and used to find it was worst just after waking. Some resistance band exercises to strengthen the hip and glute muscles made all the difference.

@Speedy this lady does a good video on treating TFL stiffness and a few other potential causes.
 
I thought I'd pulled a muscle, it actually started while I was still serving (finished at 55), came and went, but over the next few years it got worse but never to the extent that I bothered with pain killers.

About 3 years later I thought sod it, I'll mention it my GP. This was May 2018. GP was surprised as I hadn't taken pain killers, but on examination noticed that there was definitely some loss of mobility in my left hip. Sent me for an X-ray the same week. A few days later she rang me and said that my left hip looked quite bad (nothing wrong with right) and she had referred me to a consultant. Consultants appointment took about a month to come through.

The consultant said we could string it out with pain killers and some other options, but he recommended that I get it fixed. I agreed.

I had the op in October, a private hospital contracted by the NHS, very nice. I opted for something similar to an epidural (similar but a different name), which meant a less powerful general anaesthesia, went down before lunch, was up on the ward, no pain, mid afternoon.

They got me out of bed the next day, initially on a Zimmer frame, then in the afternoon the physio got me on crutches. Next day I had to prove I could walk down the corridor and use the stairs with the crutches. They would have probably let me go home but as I couldn't take a shit (painkillers caused constipation) I stayed in another night, next morning a suppository of God knows what sorted that out, and by the afternoon I was on my way home.

The next week I had an appointment with the local hospital physio, they gave me some exercises to do and asked to come back in a month unless there were any issues.

Used the crutches for about a week, then walking poles for a bit and then a stick for about 2 months.

The NHS provided a heightened toilet seat and a grabber so I didn't have to bend down to pick stuff up. I bought a support cushion to make it easier to sit down. I had to use a chiropodist for a couple of months as I couldn't reach my toe nails.

I was back at work after 6 weeks and back in the gym after 3 months. The thing that took the longest to resolve was tying my shoelaces and putting my sock on - I bought a a sock puller on Amazon worked a treat.

Edit; driving, they don't inform the DVLA, but they did recommend that I got my GPs permission before I started again, which I did after about 4 weeks.

I did find that for about 6 months, if I was sat down for much more than an hour (including driving), my leg got very stiff and painful to loosen off.

18 months on, apart from a scar and a redundant sock puller all seems ok.
 
Last edited:

neil82

Old-Salt
anybody ever damaged their sacro-illiac joint, did some damage to mine years ago and there seems to be nothing that can be done other than hot baths and painkillers, physio has no suggestions and the GP is as useful as brylcream for snakes
 

quilter

Old-Salt
Most of the posts aforementioned I have to agree with - my hip op was last Sept (Epsom South West Elective Orthopaedic Centre) after being referred by physioterrorists, I had an epidural and was semi conscious but felt nowt, heard the drilling though and the hammering, thank the Lord for liquid morphine for when the epidural wore off - staff were very efficient and patient,: very next day, physio - first the walker, days later the crutches, up the dancers and indoor marching - biggest hassle being due to the amount of fluids needed for all the painkillers etc, many trips to the nearest loo even in the midst of night and aiming to shuffle there in time and hoping no-one else was in there! Excellent recovery, 14 days post op managed to stagger to local newsagent, - important points:-
raised toilet seat, grabber, sock and knicker gadget off Ebay, most essential but best of all the sheer relief of being able to get out of bed (eventually) without pain, do all the things you couldn't pre op, Certainly gives your love life a boost too!! I am usually dancing twice weekly in heels and hope to continue after this latest unpleasantness, I give thanks each day for the NHS and the op is one of the best things ever, my Consultant Mr Gillespie is my hero. Go for it if it is offered and send my best wishes to you. :dance::blowkiss:
 

OldTimer

War Hero
Best advice I had when I had my hip replacement nearly 10 years ago was by the surgeon , we can give you a new hip , you have to make it work ! Plenty of short exercises gradually walking further each day , starting the morning after the op ,
 
Most of the posts aforementioned I have to agree with - my hip op was last Sept (Epsom South West Elective Orthopaedic Centre) after being referred by physioterrorists, I had an epidural and was semi conscious but felt nowt, heard the drilling though and the hammering, thank the Lord for liquid morphine for when the epidural wore off - staff were very efficient and patient,: very next day, physio - first the walker, days later the crutches, up the dancers and indoor marching - biggest hassle being due to the amount of fluids needed for all the painkillers etc, many trips to the nearest loo even in the midst of night and aiming to shuffle there in time and hoping no-one else was in there! Excellent recovery, 14 days post op managed to stagger to local newsagent, - important points:-
raised toilet seat, grabber, sock and knicker gadget off Ebay, most essential but best of all the sheer relief of being able to get out of bed (eventually) without pain, do all the things you couldn't pre op, Certainly gives your love life a boost too!! I am usually dancing twice weekly in heels and hope to continue after this latest unpleasantness, I give thanks each day for the NHS and the op is one of the best things ever, my Consultant Mr Gillespie is my hero. Go for it if it is offered and send my best wishes to you. :dance::blowkiss:
Re epidural......they sprayed ice cold water up legs to see if I could feel it......... few minutes later,I,(nervously) asked what should I do if I feel something........'We started 5 minutes ago' was the comforting reply.It was a bit noisy though,think they let you take an iPod in now to take your mind off the banging and sawing.
 

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