Maximum Milage.

Just as an update chaps and ladies.... My ol' man has spent six grand on a very tidy, 52,000 mile, 2012 Nissan Juke.

It seems okay, but has anyone had any experience with them, anything to watch out for?
Nissan Joke.

Big outside, small inside. Like a Tardis in reverse.
Wife's bezzie has one. She has had:
Electrics, especially radio, windows, random ABS fault lights, random check engine lights
Warped brake discs / brake judder
Uneven tyre wear
DPF clogs every so often, don't buy the diesel if you don't go on the motorway regularly

Our neighbour is a mechanic and says to avoid all Nissan CVTs as they often go titsup costing about £5k

SWMBO had a ride in it and liked it but I have totally vetoed the idea.
 
Nissan Note?

My mate has bought one despite starting out looking for a Toyota, Hyundai, Honda or Kia. Something bomb proof.

But ended up with a Note. Because it's practical. It looks shitboxy to me like a Ford Fusion.

What are the chances it will let him down?
 
Nissan Note?

My mate has bought one despite starting out looking for a Toyota, Hyundai, Honda or Kia. Something bomb proof.

But ended up with a Note. Because it's practical. It looks shitboxy to me like a Ford Fusion.

What are the chances it will let him down?
It doesn't matter, women will look at his sh!t car and he will never get laid again. Ever.

Seriously, as above, avoid CVTs, avoid later 1.2dig engines, suspensions are crappy.
 
My mum used to do silly low miles in her car, 2 miles to work each way. The car never went above 40 mph or got fully warm. It had a huge number of engine starts for its mileage.
I had to borrow it for a week for some reason and drive from Grantham to Lyneham. The thing struggled to do 60 mph. I drove it nice and slow along to Leicester and then ragged it in 3rd around the Leicester bypass A46. It drove a lot better after that.

Cars are more knackered by lots of short journeys where they never get warm than sitting on a motorway all day. The clutch could possibly had more use in short journey driving low mileage cars. Tyres also age and could degrade before they get worn out.

It seems the engines just go on.
.
I recall my great aunt Kate, a retired schoolteacher and a WW I USN veteran. Aunt Kate always drove a big model 98 Oldsmobile. After she retired she basically got up each morning, drove to 7AM Mass at church, drove to the coffee ship in her town for breakfast and then to her WW I veterans club to see her "buddies"* at the club. Probably like your mum, 3-4 miles a day. Maybe every week or so she would drive to my Gran's to visit, about 15 miles. She had engine problems and her mechanic told her a big car with a big engine needed at least 60 miles of high speed highway driving a week. She then began driving once a week to Scarborough Maine from Massachusetts to got to the Scarborough Downs harness track and make a few $2 wagers, then drive home. It solved the rough running of her Olds.

* - "buddy" was apparently a WW I veterans word for comrades. I met a few of her "buddies" from the veterans post at her funeral (which was complete with flag draped coffin, sailors in uniform and a bugler) and they addressed each other as buddy.
 

Ex_crab

Old-Salt
The oddest thing about the Juke is that to save space it doesn't have a spare wheel, but instead has a bottle of Slime (repair goo) and a plug-in compressor.

This would make sense, except that under the parcel shelf in the boot is a BFO empty plastic tray, 8 inches deep and wheel shaped, to house a spare wheel.

How is that saving space?
Juke originally came with a space saver spare, jack and wrench, hence the boot space. A few on e-bay. Failing that get a full size spare from a scrappie if the space isn't a problem. Much better than fiddling about with sealant and compressor.
 
I was in Lanzarote a while back and the cab that took us to the hotel had 850.000 kms on the clock, the speedo was not working so probably many more.
It was shabby inside but reasonable.
Merc 230 d.
Ah...the venerable Merc 230d.
For, it seemed, decades our local taxi company used them. I was in one of their 380s years back to get home from a local lad's piss-up, and noticed it was both an auto, but had 280k on it from memory. I commented it felt like new.
Thing was he assured me that was it's second time around with a renewed tranny.
The driver commented a lot of their Merc's mills never got cold...24/7 x 3 shift running apart from being serviced with oil changes pretty much on the go. Essentially on the go round the clock 7 days a week. He reckoned that was one reason for longevity. Heavy on brakes & suspension he said...our local roads are truly appalling to that figured.
 
The oddest thing about the Juke is that to save space it doesn't have a spare wheel, but instead has a bottle of Slime (repair goo) and a plug-in compressor.

This would make sense, except that under the parcel shelf in the boot is a BFO empty plastic tray, 8 inches deep and wheel shaped, to house a spare wheel.

How is that saving space?

You can have a spare, its an optional extra.
 
Ah...the venerable Merc 230d.
For, it seemed, decades our local taxi company used them. I was in one of their 380s years back to get home from a local lad's piss-up, and noticed it was both an auto, but had 280k on it from memory. I commented it felt like new.
Thing was he assured me that was it's second time around with a renewed tranny.
The driver commented a lot of their Merc's mills never got cold...24/7 x 3 shift running apart from being serviced with oil changes pretty much on the go. Essentially on the go round the clock 7 days a week. He reckoned that was one reason for longevity. Heavy on brakes & suspension he said...our local roads are truly appalling to that figured.

They aren't like that anymore

Euro V and VI emissions have killed off long lifespans like that.
Out 300,000 mile Mercs now cost an average of £1600 plus VAT at service and around the same to get through an MOT.
We're replacing them with Renaults which give less grief than the Sprinters did when new and are 40% cheaper to buy and fit out.
I was in a Nissan NV400 van last week with 323,000 miles on it, drove an awful lot better than a similar mileage Sprinter.
 

wheel

LE
Juke originally came with a space saver spare, jack and wrench, hence the boot space. A few on e-bay. Failing that get a full size spare from a scrappie if the space isn't a problem. Much better than fiddling about with sealant and compressor.
Nissan penny pinching.
 

wheel

LE
They aren't like that anymore

Euro V and VI emissions have killed off long lifespans like that.
Out 300,000 mile Mercs now cost an average of £1600 plus VAT at service and around the same to get through an MOT.
We're replacing them with Renaults which give less grief than the Sprinters did when new and are 40% cheaper to buy and fit out.
I was in a Nissan NV400 van last week with 323,000 miles on it, drove an awful lot better than a similar mileage Sprinter.
I am looking to buy LWB van for fully camper conversion including toilet/shower and really was leaning towards the Merc would you advise otherwise ?. When I do it will be a long term investment.
 

Awol

LE
You can have a spare, its an optional extra.
Nissan Joke.

Big outside, small inside. Like a Tardis in reverse.
Wife's bezzie has one. She has had:
Electrics, especially radio, windows, random ABS fault lights, random check engine lights
Warped brake discs / brake judder
Uneven tyre wear
DPF clogs every so often, don't buy the diesel if you don't go on the motorway regularly

Our neighbour is a mechanic and says to avoid all Nissan CVTs as they often go titsup costing about £5k

SWMBO had a ride in it and liked it but I have totally vetoed the idea.
It does have a small boot, less space in fact than a Polo. The old folks went shopping yesterday and had to take out the plastic spare wheel holder thingy to be sure they had enough space for everything. Interestingly, given your list above, the garage he bought it from has retained the radio to send away for repair, and replaced the two front discs for unknown reason.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Ah...the venerable Merc 230d.
For, it seemed, decades our local taxi company used them. I was in one of their 380s years back to get home from a local lad's piss-up, and noticed it was both an auto, but had 280k on it from memory. I commented it felt like new.
Thing was he assured me that was it's second time around with a renewed tranny.
The driver commented a lot of their Merc's mills never got cold...24/7 x 3 shift running apart from being serviced with oil changes pretty much on the go. Essentially on the go round the clock 7 days a week. He reckoned that was one reason for longevity. Heavy on brakes & suspension he said...our local roads are truly appalling to that figured.
I've been around all types of vehicles for over 50 years and still believe that the best of them are the ones that get their engines hot regularly and get plenty of use - petrol or diesel, air or water cooled.. The best of the lot are the one that never really get cold - such as HGVs, taxis, buses etc - and have regular oil and filter changes with the best components. Just my experience for what it's worth...
 
Interestingly, LR TD5s are being removed from rotted out Discos and being put into boats as they are incredibly robust and will easily do 200,000 miles.

They do have some issues like the oily wiring loom, fuel pressure regulator etc, but evidently can easliy be converted for marine use and are incredibly reliable.

TBH, one of the few good bits about my old Disco was the lump which was virtually indestructable -- which is more than could be said for the chassis and running gear.

One of the things I reckon is key to the TD5 is the centrifugal oil filter. Mine had the cleanest oil ever, even after 5,000 miles the oil was completely clear, whereas every other diesel I've owned had black oil after about 100 miles.
 
I am looking to buy LWB van for fully camper conversion including toilet/shower and really was leaning towards the Merc would you advise otherwise ?. When I do it will be a long term investment.

I would have no issue buying a Mercedes Sprinter, for a camper there probably isn't anything better
You aren't likely to run them for the hours/miles that we do day in and day out.

The Sprinter is at the upper end of the van market, no doubt about that at all. What is questionable is whether they re worth the premium price. I've made the decision for our fleet it isn't. (Mercedes Sprinter 314CDi with fridge conversion comes in at £39k to my spec, same spec on a Renault Master LML135 comes in at £25k)
When they get to 250,000 they'll only be fit for the knackers yard. Sprinters will last to 300,000 but by then they cost an awful lot to keep going. The cost v life argument goes to the Renault's, not the Mercedes for us.
We'll flog a van to death, after a decade we still haven't sold a working vehicle, every last one has been scrapped at end of life.

Avoid the VW Crafter/ MAN TGE (same van) as they are having fairly severe oil consumption issues and the DPF's are crap. Thet have a Golf engine in them and its just not man enough for the job.
Whichever you opt for buy the biggest horsepower you can stretch too, they generally burn less fuel than the lower horsepower ones. They tend to be spec'd higher too

For your use I would seriously look at one of the 3 litre Iveco Daily's. Strong van, plenty of go and a decent size for a camper conversion. Considerably better priced than a Sprinter.
We've gone for rear wheel drive Renault Master LML's the oldest are now 6 months old on 30 odd thousand and I'm happy enough with them. Better on fuel than a Sprinter too.
Funnily enough non of the drivers wanted them (all wanted Sprinters) but even the most argumentative of them conceded within 48 hours they liked the Renaults.

Lastly, if buying used don't believe anyone who tells you not to worry about high mileage (they last forever these things....)
Its bollox, high mileage is fine if you know the history of the vehicle. Unless you are certain it isn't so good.

We are projecting vehicle life at 4 to 5 years, for your camper its going to be more like 15 years. On that basis the Mercedes will work for you and the residual value will be good.
 
@jagman2 I'm curious to know what problems you are getting with the sprinters.

My Merc 200CDI (car) is over 110k miles and I've had no engine issues with it.

OK, I drive it sensibly and it doesn't often get hammered but interested to know. It's the 2135cc lump BTW
 
@jagman2 I'm curious to know what problems you are getting with the sprinters.

My Merc 200CDI (car) is over 110k miles and I've had no engine issues with it.

OK, I drive it sensibly and it doesn't often get hammered but interested to know. It's the 2135cc lump BTW
At 110k all we used to get were a few electrical issues and the odd DPF problem (usully cured by a forced regen)
We did get a lot of injector faults even at that mileage but that was largely cured by stopping the use of supermarket fuel

Your engine is basically the same engine as a Sprinter and will probably outlive you.

However, our remaining 12 are on an average of 320k each.....

Most problems are predictable,

Clutches/flywheel last well at 160k,
DPF around 200k,
Injectors usually pop one every 60-70k. Injector seals about the same frequency
Injector looms suffer black death around the 220k mark. Once it has this it just keep recurring
Prop-shafts often fail at around 150k
Diffs can melt down (1 in 4 or 5 vehicles ish) at around 220-240k
Coolant leaks from new, usually plastic components, they've been doing that since 6 months old.
Exhaust manifold gaskets every 80-100k, cheap part but half a days labour to fix
Alternators about 100k, most of ours have had two or three.

From about 270k rear crank oil seals fail whenever it suits them. This inevitably results in complete engine failure.
Basically they drop all of the oil on the motorway in a few seconds and sieze solid pretty much instantly. Thats a 7 grand fix and end of life. We've had six do that

Don't get me wrong, Sprinters are a good van. But Renault build a better engine.
Economic reality is that it is cheaper for me to operate Renault Master's up until 4 years and 240k than dispose than Sprinters up to 5 years and 300k
About 20% cheaper over the vehicle lifespan. Its a significant lump of money

At four years and 240k both will start to cost a considerable amount in repairs and maintenance but the Renault has reached 100% payback and can be replaced, the Mercedes still has a bit to go but is no longer reliable and is costing on repairs.

Just to add, the engine in your car isn't hauling 3500kg up to 500 miles and 12 hours a day, every day, running a refrigeration unit and being driven by any moron who can get up in the morning and turn they ignition on.
 
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