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Massive Earthquake Hits Japan *Merged*


Destroyed: A road in Naka, Iwake prefecture on March 11 shortly after being devastated by the earthquake



Transformation: The carriageway has already been reconstructed and tarmaced ready for use


Kin hell!!! It took my local council a year just to fill a 18" square pothole in the main road by my house!!

Thats impressive, if the same were to happen here, we'd still be doing H&S risk assessments to assess the damage at this stage of affairs.
 
£200 Billion clean up. The most expensive natural disaster clean up operation of all time according to the news. Bad times.
 
The cost of the cleanup and the impact of the Tsunami/Earthquake on the major Japanese businesses has been immense. Sony, Toyota and Mitsubishi all reducing production in their worldwide factories due to the loss of production at parts plants located in the Earthquake zone.

The Japanese are a resourceful nation and as can be seen in the pictures above, they will recover, it will just take time and lots of money.
 
IIRC, thorium is more prevalent in nature than uranium but is concentrated in fewer countries and the developed one most likely to use it have the smallest deposits.

Mind you, if India can get it sorted it'll make their lives a whole lot easier.
Costa Rica will be a world power. Thorium in bananas is high enough to be detected by cyclamen arches in international cargo sheds! IIRC correctly bananas don't grow without it, or seed or something that means no bananas.
 
Thats impressive, if the same were to happen here, we'd still be doing H&S risk assessments to assess the damage at this stage of affairs.
Thats not true.

We would have by now put out ten miles of cones, speed restrictions and contraflows in either direction, and an army of construction workers in hard hats and hi-viz would be leaning on their shovels, smoking roll-ups and talking to their mates on there mobiles.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
From NHK World.

NHK WORLD English

Radiation hampers cooling efforts

The effort to cool reactors at the damaged nuclear power plant in Fukushima, northern Japan, is facing the risk of leaking highly radioactive substances.

The plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, raised water pumping power on Sunday to cool the No. 2 reactor in a stable manner. On Monday, the company cut back on the amount of injected water.

The move followed the Nuclear Safety Commission's announcement that highly radioactive substances detected in puddles of water in the basement of the reactor's turbine building may have come directly from the vessel containing the reactor.

16 tons of water was being injected into the reactor every hour but TEPCO now says it wants to reduce the amount to 7 tons. This would be enough to replace the amount that is evaporating.

If the injected water level is reduced, temperatures may increase in the reactor.

TEPCO announced on Monday that radioactive substances 100,000 times higher than usual for water in a reactor core were detected in puddles in the No. 2 reactor's turbine building on Sunday.

High radiation figures were also recorded earlier in water in the basements of the turbine buildings for the No. 1 and No. 3 reactors. On Thursday, 3 workers were exposed to high radiation while working in water at the No. 3 reactor's turbine building.

The Nuclear Safety Commission said on Monday that the concentration of radiation at the No. 2 reactor was dozens of times higher than the other 2 reactors.

The commission said it assumes that radioactive substances from temporarily melted fuel rods at the No. 2 reactor had made their way into water in the reactor containment vessel and then leaked out through an unknown route.

TEPCO, later, reported that very high levels of radiation have also been observed in water in a trench just outside the turbine building for one of the reactors.

The commission said the biggest concern is the possibility of highly radioactive water seeping into the ground and the ocean. It added that all-out efforts should be made to prevent contaminated water from leaking and called on the government to intensify monitoring radiation levels in the ground water and seawater.

Reading this story, there are clearly problems in the No 2 reactor. If it is evaporating 7 tonnes of water an hour, it's evaporating 7,000 litres (or seven cubic metres) of water an hour. Assuming its going in at about 25 Deg C, that's a hell of a heat output from a core that is supposedly cooling down. And assuming that 7,000 litres is evaporating off, that's a fair bit of radioactive stream escaping.

There are also radiation hotspots around the plant - some a fair distance away - with readings of several hundred millisieverts. I have a strong suspicion that the primary containment is damaged - not in a major way, but at least enough to allow highly radioactive material to escape from the core. It could be a cracked weld or a seal gone on a valve, but I suspect that the radiation levels in the reactor building are hampering repair efforts.

I think this story has some way to run yet.

Wordsmith
 
From NHK World.

NHK WORLD English



Reading this story, there are clearly problems in the No 2 reactor. If it is evaporating 7 tonnes of water an hour, it's evaporating 7,000 litres (or seven cubic metres) of water an hour. Assuming its going in at about 25 Deg C, that's a hell of a heat output from a core that is supposedly cooling down. And assuming that 7,000 litres is evaporating off, that's a fair bit of radioactive stream escaping.

There are also radiation hotspots around the plant - some a fair distance away - with readings of several hundred millisieverts. I have a strong suspicion that the primary containment is damaged - not in a major way, but at least enough to allow highly radioactive material to escape from the core. It could be a cracked weld or a seal gone on a valve, but I suspect that the radiation levels in the reactor building are hampering repair efforts.

I think this story has some way to run yet.

Wordsmith

Hell of a lot of salt left behind in something thats not meant to have salt in it as well.
 
Thats not true.

We would have by now put out ten miles of cones, speed restrictions and contraflows in either direction, and an army of construction workers in hard hats and hi-viz would be leaning on their shovels, smoking roll-ups and talking to their mates on there mobiles.

For any actual construction to commence in Britain,a full meeting of the steering committee of the joint roads infrastructure(disaster recovery) working group would have to report to the co-ordination sub-commitee of the local council,who would have to seek approval from the Transport Ministry to conduct a risk assessmant, a cost benefit analysis and an enviromental impact study and seek EU approval before any physical work had the slightest chance of commencing.Only then could contracts be issued for work to commence not before January 2015 to construction companies in Poland and Romania.
 

blingbling

Old-Salt
Evaporating 7 tonnes of water an hour requires a heat input of approximately 5 megawatts, which isn't that unreasonable given the table here:
What is Decay Heat? | MIT NSE Nuclear Information Hub (http://web.mit.edu/nse/)

The IAEA report that water injection on reactors 2 and 3 has switched to fresh water from seawater, with the equivalent switch planned for reactors 1 and 4 today:
Fukushima Nuclear Accident Update Log

That should stop the salt accumulation, although won't reduce the current brine concentrations unless they're bleeding the liquor off somewhere.
 

Blogg

LE
Thats impressive, if the same were to happen here, we'd still be doing H&S risk assessments to assess the damage at this stage of affairs.

Some may recall that after a spot of sandy unpleasantness a while back there were many an oil fire to be extinguished.

In return for the efforts of this country, a certain British company was given the task of doing 80.

A team was dispatched. The sites were surveyed in vast detail, risk assessments, costings, timelines, etc etc done and after full and mature consideration by bureacrats and lawyers (i.e. ****ing slow) a tender document and contract pack was submitted. Unfortunately HMG had chosen a company run by a consortium of other companies none of which had any real oil firefighting experience.

So said British consortium, chosen by HMG and having pratted about for months, immediately sub contracted it out to a US firm, who essentially just got on with it.

There was another UK company ready and able to do the job but they were effectively banjaxed by contractual and political bullshit.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
For any acual construction to commence in Britain,a full meeting of the steering committee of the joint roads infrastructure(disaster recovery) working group would have to report to the co-ordination sub-commitee of the local council,who would have to seek approval from the Transport Ministry to conduct a risk assessmant, a cost benefit analysis and an evviromental impact study and seek EU approval before any physical work had the slightest chance of commencing.Only then could contracts be issued for work to commence not before January 2015 to construction companies in Poland and Romania.

Bear in mind also the issues that would arise if the said disaster covered more than one Local Authority. Before the above could take place there would have to be inter-County meetings to decide who was responsible for doing what!!
 
Lots of neds will now go and claim disability due to radiation sickness

Nah.

a) they won't be able to spell a word as long as 'radiation'.

b) there's no way to tell if they've been exposed to radiation over and above the normal background sunbed readings.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Latest from the Fukushima reactors.

Japan may have lost race to save nuclear reactor | World news | The Guardian

The radioactive core in a reactor at the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant appears to have melted through the bottom of its containment vessel and on to a concrete floor, experts say, raising fears of a major release of radiation at the site.

The warning follows an analysis by a leading US expert of radiation levels at the plant. Readings from reactor two at the site have been made public by the Japanese authorities and Tepco, the utility that operates it.

Richard Lahey, who was head of safety research for boiling-water reactors at General Electric when the company installed the units at Fukushima, told the Guardian workers at the site appeared to have "lost the race" to save the reactor, but said there was no danger of a Chernobyl-style catastrophe.

Workers have been pumping water into three reactors at the stricken plant in a desperate bid to keep the fuel rods from melting down, but the fuel is at least partially exposed in all the reactors.

At least part of the molten core, which includes melted fuel rods and zirconium alloy cladding, seemed to have sunk through the steel "lower head" of the pressure vessel around reactor two, Lahey said.

"The indications we have, from the reactor to radiation readings and the materials they are seeing, suggest that the core has melted through the bottom of the pressure vessel in unit two, and at least some of it is down on the floor of the drywell," Lahey said. "I hope I am wrong, but that is certainly what the evidence is pointing towards."

The major concern when molten fuel breaches a containment vessel is that it reacts with the concrete floor of the drywell underneath, releasing radioactive gases into the surrounding area. At Fukushima, the drywell has been flooded with seawater, which will cool any molten fuel that escapes from the reactor and reduce the amount of radioactive gas released.

The molten core should still be held within the primary containment vessel, but the chances of the immediate area getting a significant dose of radioactive contamination have gone up.

Wordsmith
 
For any acual construction to commence in Britain,a full meeting of the steering committee of the joint roads infrastructure(disaster recovery) working group would have to report to the co-ordination sub-commitee of the local council,who would have to seek approval from the Transport Ministry to conduct a risk assessmant, a cost benefit analysis and an evviromental impact study and seek EU approval before any physical work had the slightest chance of commencing.Only then could contracts be issued for work to commence not before January 2015 to construction companies in Poland and Romania.
Thanks for that. And here is me thinking ignorantly that no work would get done....
 

Ritch

LE
News channels reporting that a 7.4 Earthquake has struck just off Japan and they're prediciting a 2-metre tsunami.
 

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