Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Mass Shootings in the US

endure

GCM
Your three year degree would translate to roughly 90 credit hours. Or an associates, but not a bachelors degree.

One might also understand that the immigrants of the past also managed to fit in quickly.
We don't have associate degrees in the UK. There are other quals at a similar level (HNC/HND) but they're not degrees.
 
We don't have associate degrees in the UK. There are other quals at a similar level (HNC/HND) but they're not degrees.
I think foundation degrees are available in some subjects and are done in 2 years. Presumably those would be a rough equivalent to an American associate degree.
 
Then what pray tell is your degree in?

The AP courses can get one credit at university and help attain the magic 120. The bits you don’t discuss are course scheduling and credit loads. A full load is considered 12 credit hours, but you need 15 each semester to make it in four years. I had several semesters where I was taking closer to 20 credit hours. I did however get to opt out of PE...

Kindergarten has advanced considerably here. Pre K is the norm for 3-4 year olds. Different approaches.

Here is another point you seem to miss. Not everybody wants to be like Europe. Certainly not you Brits it seems.

A UK honours degree is equivalent to a US Masters degree:

[52] Ron Dearing (23 July 1997). "Appendix 5: Higher education in other countries". Quality and standards. The National Committee of Enquiry into Higher Education (Dearing Report). Archived from the original on 24 October 2017. 7.21 The team gained the impression, based on an inspection of syllabuses and examination papers, that the American high school diploma compares in standard with GCSE and the associate degree with GCE A-level and Advanced GNVQ, the bachelor's degree with a UK pass degree or higher national diploma and the Master's degree with a bachelor's honours degree from a British university. Further evidence for this conclusion: Howard University in Washington, a university in which over 99 per cent of undergraduates are black, admits overseas applicants from the West Indies with five GCE O-level grades at A-C to the first year of their bachelor's degree programme; Johns Hopkins, one of the most prestigious of the private universities, states in its prospectus that advanced placement is available for students entering with either International Baccalauréat or GCE A-level. The rider must be added, however, that an American education is very much more general than a UK education right up to bachelor's level; it would hardly be reasonable, therefore, to expect the same standard to be reached in the major subject. It was also noted that, in the highest quality institutions, some individual modules taken by senior students compared well in level with UK final honours standard. A given student would take rather fewer of these more demanding modules than a UK student, however.
 
Your three year degree would translate to roughly 90 credit hours. Or an associates, but not a bachelors degree.

One might also understand that the immigrants of the past also managed to fit in quickly.

An associates degree is an acceptable US qualification for starting a UK bachelor's degree course at a reasonable but not stellar University, for example. High school diploma doesn't cut it.


What subject did you study?
 
An associates degree is an acceptable US qualification for starting a UK bachelor's degree course at a reasonable but not stellar University, for example. High school diploma doesn't cut it.


What subject did you study?
Sociology with a minor in beer pong.

According to your link it will with AP testing and the old SAT/ACT.
 
Then what pray tell is your degree in?

Take your pick, I have a few including higher degrees: Software engineering, Information systems for business, geographic information systems and another one. I am also a city and guilds qualified welder, and an advanced(master) plumber. What can I say, I like learning. In the US I have done the electricians certificate, not quite all of the HVAC certificate and I am presently doing an undergraduate certificate in construction management by distance learning - keeps the brain active.

The AP courses can get one credit at university and help attain the magic 120. The bits you don’t discuss are course scheduling and credit loads. A full load is considered 12 credit hours, but you need 15 each semester to make it in four years. I had several semesters where I was taking closer to 20 credit hours. I did however get to opt out of PE...

There you go waffling about 120 credit hours again. No one outside the US gives a to55 about credit hours as such, and as for transcripts fcuk me, really, no one cares. We certainly don't teach english, maths, geography and history to kids on degree courses unless it is course relevant. In all other countries they have learnt to read, write, and count before they turn up at university.

Kindergarten has advanced considerably here. Pre K is the norm for 3-4 year olds. Different approaches.

Still counts as kindergarten academically and not school. Or would you like to tell the nice people at the State Department they are wrong when they issue greencards?

Here is another point you seem to miss. Not everybody wants to be like Europe. Certainly not you Brits it seems.

Seems you do, or you would not hang around here.

Seriously mate, not having a pop at you, but coming close to it. You need to understand that the US is not the best at everything and that there are some better ways of doing things around this planet. Most of us on here have lived in different countries around the planet and seen different cultures, peoples and ways of doing things...........why do you think we took the concept of chinese takeaways and curry houses back to the UK.
 
Tube Alloys, Werner von Braun etc

I think the main biggies the US invented are the refrigerator and the integrated circuit / microchip.
Actually, mechanical refrigeration was invented in Australia in 1854

 
You also have to remember that the Septics have developed no real history to speak of in the couple of weeks (relatively speaking) they've been a country. So they got Hollywood to make one up for them. Now they can decide if they're descended from Daniel Boone, Wyatt Earp, Wild Bill Hickock, John Wayne or a host of other rather questionable but still "manly" luminaries.

MsG
O'irsh History 101

Wail about being forced into civilization by the Brits, try numerous times to kick them out and fail. In revenge murder your O'rish protestant neighbor woman who is 80 and one legged (and write a song about it)

Wail about no Po-tay-tos, but do nothing to help yourself out. die like the festering carrion you inbred lot of ginger Orangutans you are

Wail about family (includes da who touched them while sleeping) being slotted 3 times by a spitfire Mk Vb flown by Churchill as they dug for peat to eat

Wail about not being able to beat the wimmin folk anymore when ye come back from the pub soused as a Lemur

Wail about the Priest not touching you anymore now that you are an adult
 
A three year degree in Europe would not translate into a Bachelor’s degree here. It would fall well short of the mark.

I've spent 18 of the last 20 years involved in university assessment and credit transfer, etc, etc, so am reasonably confident of my ground when I say that's a bit of a misunderstanding.

For the sake of simplicity, the European Credit Transfer System has a generic rule of thumb which is 2 UK Credits = 1 ECTS Credit = 2 US Credits which enables a generic comparison to be made.

To mildly complicate matters, although the UK and Europe use what's called the Bologna Process so that there is standardisation between us, we inevitably chose to use a slightly different form of calculation so that a UK 30 Credit module is a European 15 Credit module and an undergraduate degree is 360 Credits in the UK and 180 in Europe (for a 3 year programme)

Nevertheless 120 Credits in the US = 60 ECTS/120 UK Credits. And so on.

However, this isn't that precise- because it means that an Undergrad at the University of London gains 360 US Credits over three years compared to our American student's 120-130.

Which isn't that helpful in making any sort of exact comparison, even if our splendid (irony alert) Secretary of State for Education, in one of his more nationalistic moments, might cheerfully claim that UK graduates are 3 times better than US graduates and be puzzled when the reaction (from within the UK) was 'Errrrrr....' I can say from experience that US students are neither 3 times less capable nor do 3 times less work than UK students.

When you get into the actual business of credit transfer and accrediting international institutions in terms of years/terms/semesters abroad, then this nice, neat calculation falls to pieces and you can have a single institution in the US (say) calculating credits for UK institutions in 3 different ways (so a semester studying at (say) Oxford Brooks can bring 30 UK and 15 US Credits for a University of South Carolina student, whereas if a student does a semester at LSE, they get 30 UK Credits but 2 US Credits...) And having done one inordinately long post on Arrse today, I'm not even going to begin to try to explain why that sort of wild difference can make sense.
 
Last edited:
Top