Martial Arts - Bad or good for an injury?

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Dr_Chris, Sep 20, 2007.

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  1. That's a bit of a stupid topic name, but thought it makes it pretty plain.

    I've had pretty bad shin splints for a while and am therefore unable to do much running, especially with weight. I want to keep my fitness up and was therefore looking into starting a martial art. What I wanted to ask you chaps/chapesses is whether this would be a good way to maintain fitness and help build my muscle back up, or whether it would be likely to make the injury worse?

    Cheers in advance.
     
  2. im a proffessional martial arts instructor, and it has always kept me in pretty good shape. i do plenty of running aswel but even so, depending on what you decide to do, its good for cardio fitness and muscle tone.

    ive never had anybody in a class with shin splints before so couldnt comment on that. but with regards to general injury. if the class is taught properly and the students arent nutters, the risk is extremely minimal. a good instructor is key.
    PM me and i should be able to suggest a good school in your area.

    benjy
     
  3. Having done some martial arts I would say its probably not a good idea. In Taekwondo at least there is a lot of pressure on the ankles, calves and shins which might make shin splints worse. The other thing you might want to consider is that injury rates in martial arts are generally quite high due to the intensity of the training.

    You could try something like Judo where you are not throwing yourself through the air or doing high kicks. Capoera (spelling?) might be another option but I would definately stay away from Taekwondo, and Muay Thai, not least because many clubs use running as a main form of getting the students CV fitness working.

    If you have bad shin splints I reckon the best thing to do is lots of swimming. It can be a bit boring but wont mess you up anymore and is good cardio. Otherwise maybe cycling?

    When your injury is healed however, Taekwondo or Muay Thai are very very good for your general fitness. I was very fit indeed when I was competing. One lad from the team got through P Coy on the fitness he built up at our club.

    J.
     
  4. Ah that must be why half of us were always injured...

    J.
     
  5. I did Taekwondo years ago and must say I didn't really enjoy it. Also did a tiny bit of muay thai, which was good fun because it was physical, but I think would be bad for impact (ie kicking people with my shins).

    I have a mate who's pretty good at parts of ninjitsu, which sounds pretty interesting. I'm interested in what hs says he does, as it sounds like a very practical martial art.
     
  6. I did karate for about 5 years, as well as kung-fu and ju-jitsu for shorter periods. The worst injuries I saw in that time were broken noses and toes.

    Working in a hospital x-ray department, I know that the "safe" sports that they do in schools (football, hockey, rugby, etc) cause a lot more injuries than martial arts do - at least those that need A&E treatment anyway.
     
  7. Depends on the Ninjutsu class/instructor. I found a good one a few years back (Don't go anymore due to posting) spot on instructor and a class full of forces, ex forces, prison officers and coppers so alot of practical experience being thrown into the chinese (Japanese) parliament method of teaching before getting on the mats and grafting!

    However most Bujinkan and BBD dojos were sh1t and i found alot of them to be the "Walts of the Martial arts world." Thus i'm now just hitting a bag in my spare time and doing a bit of Judo to keep a mate company!

    On that note don't be scared of trying judo as it allegedly means "The Gentle way". Doesn't feel gentle when you get slammed however I haven't seen more than a few broken fingers in the last few months!
     
  8. Kendo is very good for a CV work out, and imporves breathing and upper-body strength. DO NOT do it with shin splints as the nature of the art will make it worse. When they are better give it a go.

    Swimming is the best thing you can do if you have shin splints as it is zero impact, while being a good whole-body work out.
     
  9. what you need to work on is your lower front leg muscles, as shin splints are caused by a muscle imbalance, your calves are generally stronger and doing alot of runs could cause shin splints.
     
  10. i would recommend you aviod martial arts like the plague in your condition qand stick to things like swimming and upper body weights my instructor would kill me i f i tried to train on an injury and made it worse.
    bad crow what ninpo dojo was it you trained in i currently train in the genbukan dojo and i dont like the fact i cant spar in it.