Married soldiers not entitled to MQ's after 8 years..

#1
As said,this is going to put a lot of marraiges under strain but on the other hand,it'll force service families to look at their future plans for when the serving member leaves a lot earlier...

Married soldiers living in Army accommodation could be forced to leave their homes if proposals being considered to reduce services housing are adopted.

The move, being considered by the MoD, would force thousands of serving Armed Forces personnel onto the commercial property market.

It would mean soldiers no longer have the right to a home after eight years of service and is part a plan to reduce Services accommodation under a 'New Employment Model'.
Apologies,it's the daily hate...

Married soldiers forced to leave Army accommodation as part of cuts to £318m housing bill | Mail Online
 
#2
Geting rid of service accomodation has been an aim of the MoD for many years.
 
#4
I'd say this was a positive step in the right direction if handled and resourced properly. The biggest single hurdle in successfully transitioning soldiers back into civyy street is finding suitable accommodation and if we can get them into civilian housing early on (owned hopefully) then it will bring all sorts of benefits. Clearly there are obstacles to overcome, not least the provision of significant financial incentives and assistance in order to help people onto the housing ladder; and the requirement (in spite of the end of the arms plot and the intro of Super Garrisons) to still move people around the UK and elsewhere every 2 or 3 years.

Overall though, if managed properly, this should significantl benefit our soldiers.
 
#5
Fan-****ing-tastic for the vast majority of the Army who are trickle posted. Are you really going to expect somebody to buy/rent a new house every 2-3 years?
 
#6
wages would have to rise to offset the higher costs of renting in the private sector, more so in areas like London. Some areas would see a massive shortage in rental availability due to having a garrison nearby.
I work near Tern Hill which is home to 1 Royal Irish. Tern Hill has the barracks, the housing estate, a closed down pub and a shop. Maybe the answer in that case would be to sell the estate to a private landlord(s).
Would we then maybe see families with no connection to the military moving onto what were msq estates? Overgrown gardens full of old sofa's and scrap cars on blocks?
 
#8
The nature of the job means having to move around. Persons looking for a long career stretch will not want to commit to the commercial market for housing till perhaps 5 or so years before their discharge date.

Family sepration, kids schools all have to be considered as part of the mix.

Whilst I think it is important to impress upon and provide incentives in the last few years of service to get onto the property ladder the Government is trying to do away with service housing completely.

Fecking shower the lot of them.
 
#9
I assume there would be some allowance given to those working in expensive areas, it all makes sense to me 8 years is more than enough to get sorted and there is nothing wrong in renting anyway.

Edit to say, this makes sense if the MoD stick to their plan of super garrisons and having units based in locations permanently giving long term continuity and security for service families for education and spouse employment.

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#10
100% increase in interest to postings in cheap Northern areas or Scotland. 99.9% decrease in preferecnes to be based around Surrey, London or other high property value areas?

Will we see a rise in greedy landlords raising rental prices in remote areas around garrisons such as Tidworth, Warminster etc. that don't have large urban areas nearby?

How will it work for whole Regiments on roulement postings? Will there be a shortage of available housing to buy/rent as major units move almost simultaniously?
 
#11
I seem to remember reading that the average length of service for most personnel is 5-8 years, so in reality the vast majority of people wont be affected by this. Add to this a reality that most Army moves will be limited as we move to super garrisons, and its probably not as bad as made out.
How many people join these days for the accommodation? It would be useful to get an understanding of how much an appeal provision of subsidised accommodation is in an era when wives/partners often have their own career anyway and may not want to be tied to a garrison location.
 
#12
On a similar not- lads in my coy have been informed that they will have to pay double on their pads as of 2015..
 
#13
Not sure this will actually happen - the article is from February last year. I expect the amount we pay on pads will go up soon though. Pay £70 a month for mine. Rather nice it is too!
 
#15
I'd say this was a positive step in the right direction if handled and resourced properly. The biggest single hurdle in successfully transitioning soldiers back into civyy street is finding suitable accommodation and if we can get them into civilian housing early on (owned hopefully) then it will bring all sorts of benefits. Clearly there are obstacles to overcome, not least the provision of significant financial incentives and assistance in order to help people onto the housing ladder; and the requirement (in spite of the end of the arms plot and the intro of Super Garrisons) to still move people around the UK and elsewhere every 2 or 3 years.

Overall though, if managed properly, this should significantl benefit our soldiers.
I fully agree managed properly this will benefit many overall, however with the Germany withdrawal programme this may escalate.




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#16
How will it work for whole Regiments on roulement postings? Will there be a shortage of available housing to buy/rent as major units move almost simultaniously?
If a Regiment gets posted, and there isnt enough housing available in the local area, the families will have to be left at the previous posting, which would cause a knock on effect for the familes moving into that posting. There would have to be a large investment in singlie accomodation, as pads would have to live in this until housing becomes available. I cant see it working effectively.
 
#17
On a similar not- lads in my coy have been informed that they will have to pay double on their pads as of 2015..
they have yet to actually ratify the legal challenge to the proposal to increase SFA rental prices to "aggregated market rate" already SFA are more expensive than social housing in many areas and whilst those rental prices do increase by a small fraction per year (there capped at a maximum of CPI +2.5% or 5% depending what the LHA sets them on)

the whole idea was to raise the price of SFA to the average price of social housing whilst still providing free water/sewage and utilising the F&L charges, the problem is all but one estate did away with F&L in the UK back in 95 (which just happened to be the estate they used to make the recommendations from) so the increases in price twice a year in order to bring rental amounts for soldiers in grade 1 accommodation to matching that of the average private rental price across the uk (bearing in mind that some places cost upwards of 24k a month) was flawed from the start, yet Labour pursued it anyway, and were still have all there plotting monkeys working within the MOD dreaming up ridiculous ideas to screw the forces every few weeks,

I wouldn't of minded paying market rate -20% for a nice 4 bed house, the problem is my last grade 1 quarter had air gaps where there should of been walls cost over 2grand a year in heating and because it was of crap construction (but had all the right number of electric points/toilets and a tiled power shower) with slightly above average "living space" it was classed as grade 1 until the sewage started surfacing in the garden and rising up one of the interior walls (then it was marked down to grade 4 due for demolition.....) they fixed the leak resurfaced the garden plastered + tiled the interior wall and replaced the kitchen but due to all the gaps in the walls couldn't be put back up above grade 4....

when they down graded the house they did it retrospectively to the day I moved into it 3 years previously and I got one hell of a wedge back (from £6.57 a day to £0.50 a day) then when I got MD'd the price went up to £17.50 a day until I argued the toss and got It dropped using TSAR's.......

the problem with all the MOD estates is they don't own any of them and under the contract with Annington Homes (who bought them all) they have to release 15% of the total housing stock every so many years for retail sale .......this latest announcement is them trying to find a way of selling dodgy houses (to be fair most of the dodgy ones were built in a rush to meet a short to mid term need expected to be less than 25 years and are still in use some 50+ years latter) meeting that commitment and still providing housing for service personnel.

however they fix the problem its going to mean a major mind set change and an end to posting on rotation unless units buy houses and rent them to there gypsy staff.
 
#18
Wouldn't this put a strain on the single guys accommodation with married guys going unaccompanied?
 
#19
This is one part of the plan; whether or not the Army realises it now future careers will involve staying put in one "super-barracks" for most if not all of ones career. This is one of the levers to make that happen.

But, I hear you cry, these days we move around every 2 or 3 years. Well, as future cuts bite and accommodation issues caused by this policy build up the costs associated will rise to the extent that the Army will have to find a way to operate that doesn't involve regular moves. Feature, not a bug. Or call it insurance against wilful obstruction by the Army to a new policy, if you like.

Why is this happening ? Because no-one outside the Army involved in funding believes frequent moves will make any sense for a UK based Army wearing a groove from barracks to training areas and back again. They will give permanence to family life, get soldiers a foot on the housing ladder - what's not to like ? But again I hear that cry, I have to move for my career. Well, the Army is expected to manage careers now without sending squaddies bouncing round the UK like pinballs in a machine. If the Army does not change it will just hack off anyone past the 8 year point.

Other levers include the slow ramping up of MQ charges to average UK civvy costs, and as mentioned below it's already starting.

Mark my words, change is coming and it is being imposed on the Army. If you're surprised then you haven't been paying attention and that is largely the problem.
 
#20
We had a married couple(both serving) in my old unit in Germany come from a Qtr to get put into a double room in the block for a few months whislt they waited on a Qtr becoming available even had the joy's of block inspections ....must have been cheffed to fuk with that move.
 

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